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    Hello,

    So I'm looking for philosophers, books and essays that cover the concept of death.

    So far I've come across: Heidegger and his concept of being-towards-death, a couple of paragraphs from Wittgenstein (who more or less repeats Heidegger) and one chapter of Reasons and Persons by Derek Parfitt.

    I'm not looking for anything like Camus' disscusion of suicide, rather, I want to find people who analyse the concept of death itself and have different takes on it and what it means in regards to how we should live.

    I'm not particularly interested in studies on reincarnation or life-after-death beliefs unless they're philosophically interesting. For example, if there were (easily accessible) psychological studies carried out to see why people need these beliefs, then these might be interesting.

    I wouldn't mind hearing the views of other non-philosophers too (I'm referring to famous writers, poets, scientists, and not you personally!)

    Thanks!
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    (Original post by Rob19)
    ...
    http://academicearth.org/courses/death - Currently on the second lecture and it's interesting so far and enjoyable. The beginning of the first lecture actually states that it's not going to discuss the psychological or sociological conception of death, he states that he will only discuss philosophical questions of death.
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    Thanks, these look really good!
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    Try John Bowker, the Meanings of Death (I think that is the title). The conclusion chapter really helped me in an essay I wrote about death. Another is Lucretius on Life and Mind, and also Phaedo by Plato.
    Hope these help
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    Damn, I was going to recommend Camus' 'The Outsider'. I haven't read Camus' thoughts on suicide, but the last part of 'The Outsider' is about a man who is condemned to death, and how he deals with it/his reaction to it.

    I wouldn't reject Camus out of hand based on his thoughts on suicide. On a personal level, my friend died earlier this year (my last words to him were actually explaining the outsider to him, which is rather disconcerting) and that event, in conjunction with the thoughts conveyed in the final chapter had a really profound effect how I viewed everything. The novel for me truly makes you consider how you feel at the thought of imminent death.

    Sorry for me to ramble on

    anyway, even if you don't decide to read it, here's a section which really made me think;

    "But naturally, you can’t always be rational. At other times, for example, I’d work out new legal policies. I’d reform the punishment system. I’d realized that the essential thing was to give the condemned man a chance. Even one in a thousand was quite enough to sort things out. For instance, I imagined that they could find some chemical compound for the patient to take (I thought of him as the patient) which would kill him nine times out of ten. He would know this, that was the condition. Because when I really thought about it and considered things calmly, I could see that what was wrong with the guillotine was that you had no chance at all, absolutely none. In fact it had been decided once and for all that the patient would die. It was a classified fact, a firmly fixed arrangement, a definite agreement which there was no question of going back on. In the unlikely event of something going wrong, they just started again. Consequently, the annoying thing was that the condemned man had to hope that the machine worked properly. I say this is what's wrong with the system. That's true in a way. But in another way, I had to admit that it also possessed the whole secret of good organization. After all, the condemned man was obliged to lend moral support. It was in his interest that everything should go off without a hitch." [Albert Camus, The Outsider]
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    Hi, thanks everyone.

    I've read all of Camus' books and I'm a big fan, I just meant that 'the Myth of Sisyphus' isn't relevant (for me) and so there's no point mentioning it.
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    (Original post by Annoying-Mouse)
    http://academicearth.org/courses/death - Currently on the second lecture and it's interesting so far and enjoyable. The beginning of the first lecture actually states that it's not going to discuss the psychological or sociological conception of death, he states that he will only discuss philosophical questions of death.
    Thanks for that! They look really interesting.
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    I think Nietzche's earlier stuff deals a lot about death. Plato is a good source especially.
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    try islamic books that speaks about concept of death and how we should on earth, get a different feeling on how other side view the point of death(enrich your knowledge ).
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    (Original post by al_habib)
    try islamic books that speaks about concept of death and how we should on earth, get a different feeling on how other side view the point of death(enrich your knowledge ).
    Why? The Islamic concept of death isn't what he is looking for because it isn't much different to other religions and isn't really philosophical.
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    Hi, yeah I've already read most of Nietzsche's works too, I'm going to use him a bit already.

    Islam isn't really what I'm looking for as it's not philosophically relevant, but thanks anyway.
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    (Original post by Rob19)
    Hello,

    So I'm looking for philosophers, books and essays that cover the concept of death.

    So far I've come across: Heidegger and his concept of being-towards-death, a couple of paragraphs from Wittgenstein (who more or less repeats Heidegger) and one chapter of Reasons and Persons by Derek Parfitt.

    I'm not looking for anything like Camus' disscusion of suicide, rather, I want to find people who analyse the concept of death itself and have different takes on it and what it means in regards to how we should live.

    I'm not particularly interested in studies on reincarnation or life-after-death beliefs unless they're philosophically interesting. For example, if there were (easily accessible) psychological studies carried out to see why people need these beliefs, then these might be interesting.

    I wouldn't mind hearing the views of other non-philosophers too (I'm referring to famous writers, poets, scientists, and not you personally!)

    Thanks!
    On youtube there's a series of lectures by Yale philosophy professor Shelly Kagan. The whole series is on death, and it's really interesting and useful if you're studying philosophy. Seriously, check it out.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p2J7wSuFRl8

    There's the link to the first lecture; there are about 20 in total.

    Edit: never mind, someone posted links to the same videos in an earlier comment.
 
 
 
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