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    What do you think ?
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    I'm afraid I really don't like it. The nose and chin are especially poor and I don't know what you are trying to convey. The background has an interesting texture at best. Would you mind telling me what your background in art is: GCSE/A-Level?
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    Nothing amzing, but it's pretty
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    Its not great I'm afraid. There's a really awkward compositional arrangement between the profile of the face and the background - really linear and unbalanced.
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    It's a bad photograph of a painting you look as if you've not spent a great deal of time on. It doesn't look as if you've even made any attempt to do shading, and the face is just incorrect. If you were trying to convey something through it's print-like look and weird shaped lips, eyes, etc. then I don't get it.
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    I do like the contrast between the completmentary colours, but the composition is really not that great tbh. Where did you get your inspiration?
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    dude even I can draw better and I am an engineer o.O
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    Perhaps if I show you something I have done in order to show you the standard (however low it may be!) This is a life-drawing I did fairly recently and although it is by no means fantastic, it has had some positive comments. I sent it off to Manchester and I'm sure it helped them give me an offer. It was cropped majorly due to size and awful neck!

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    Second one is better, but you fundamentally need to understand the medium you're working in. The texture, colour and consistency of the paint, not using raw colours out of the tube varying the pressure and intensity of your brush strokes, layering colours and thicknesses, building up richness in the image... and here you needs to experiment with the type of strokes you use with the charcoal. The feminine form could be drawn crudely and with force, but I don't think her pose is really saying that... I think it should be drawn with a lighter touch, smaller marks moving sensitively over her. She looks like a woman getting into bed after a long day and deserves to be treated a little more tenderly
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    That's more like it.
    There are some issues, but it's got a confidence of tacking the image tonally, that's one thing the OP should spend time learning.
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    (Original post by Quiller)
    Second one is better, but you fundamentally need to understand the medium you're working in. The texture, colour and consistency of the paint, not using raw colours out of the tube varying the pressure and intensity of your brush strokes, layering colours and thicknesses, building up richness in the image... and here you needs to experiment with the type of strokes you use with the charcoal. The feminine form could be drawn crudely and with force, but I don't think her pose is really saying that... I think it should be drawn with a lighter touch, smaller marks moving sensitively over her. She looks like a woman getting into bed after a long day and deserves to be treated a little more tenderly
    I totally agree. I have always worked very aggressively and it, ironically, has frustrated me. I used to panic but now I've learned that this is a habit and it is very hard to break out of it. So I am learning to adapt my aggressive drawing ever so slowly. If I remember correctly, this model did seem quite tired in the face and perhaps, subconsciously this develops from that. I fully aggree that this was done far too crudely and was very embarrassed when all the other far more 'delicate' drawers had a look Perhaps I treat drawing as too much a physical activity as opposed to trying to capture something consciously. I need to break out of this.
 
 
 
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