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    Is there anyone currently studying this course?
    Know anyone studying it?
    Previously studied it?

    What were/is your experience, and did you/are you enjoying the course so far?

    Thanks
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    Hello Kay,

    I am in exactly the same boat as you, I currently hold an offer from the Uni of Warwick for the BA Law and Soc., however i am not sure whether I should accept it!
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    Hey

    Long reply!

    Mmm, what have you heard about the course/uni etc?
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    Hi, I can answer questions about the general uni life and the Sociology side of the course. Don't know much about the Law degree though!!!
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    Did you go to the open evening last Wednesday?

    I went but I was just looking for Sociology and not for Sociology and law.
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    (Original post by screenager2004)
    Hi, I can answer questions about the general uni life and the Sociology side of the course. Don't know much about the Law degree though!!!
    Ah that's good How are the lecturers? Are there many books/a lot of content to cover? Is the work very challenging? Is it reputable? Which particular research/field in sociology does Warwick seem to know a lot of? Is the library any good? Is the course interesting? Finally Any bad things? If not, general positives..

    Thank you so much
    (Original post by choly7)
    Did you go to the open evening last Wednesday?

    I went but I was just looking for Sociology and not for Sociology and law.
    I wanted to go! But I couldn't make it, how did you find it?!
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    (Original post by Kay :))
    Ah that's good How are the lecturers? Are there many books/a lot of content to cover? Is the work very challenging? Is it reputable? Which particular research/field in sociology does Warwick seem to know a lot of? Is the library any good? Is the course interesting? Finally Any bad things? If not, general positives..

    Thank you so much
    Haha so many questions! I'd be glad to answer them!

    How are the lecturers?
    Firstly, there are a lot of them and they're all different! In my experience they've been (naturally) well qualified for what they do, and although each is different in their style and how much they deviate from the lecture topics or elaborate with examples, or moderate the speed at which the module progresses: they all consistently offer support outside of lectures if you have a question or problem - personal or academic. The university wouldn't have such a good reputation otherwise!

    Are there many books/a lot of content to cover?
    The reading list is ridiculous. I will take a couple of my current modules as examples:

    This is the standard module structure.
    One module lasts an academic year, it is split into 20 weekly topics (20 lectures) - these topics all link together theoretically and chronologically into one coherent module.

    In this particular module, each week you attend the lecture (1 hour).
    Then you read certain books that explore this topic: the lecturer provides a reading list at the beginning of the year.
    5 'readings' (Chapters, entire sections or entire books) are considered to be important 'key readings' - they sum up the topic particularly well.
    Then there are a further 30 readings that further illustrate the topic.

    You will never read every reading. There is more than is physically possible to read! Most people read 2 or 3 texts for each topic. Some less, some more. The only time you really use those extra 30 readings is when you're specialising/doing an essay.

    So in that respect, you can see how there is a lot of content: but you aren't required to cover it all.

    Is the work very challenging?

    I would put it this way: it is easy to pass (40%). It is very difficult to get a first (70%). Only two or three students graduate with a first each year. This is why you get wildly contrasting opinions of uni between "uni is easy I only have 8 hours a week lolololol" and "uni is very difficult I am reading every hour of the day" - you get out of it what you put in, it's as difficult as you make it.

    Is it reputable?
    On paper, yes. Warwick graduates have the 2nd highest Graduate employment rate for Sociology students (behind Cambridge). Personally I have not had any trouble finding work, getting onto this scholarship, getting onto internships etc - obviously it's about the effort you put in as an individual - but it certainly hasn't closed any doors for me.

    Which particular research/field in sociology does Warwick seem to know a lot of?

    Their strengths are definitely in:
    Science and technology in Society
    Medical Sociology (Health and Illness in Society)
    Gender - there's a very strong feminist stream here!
    Representation (culture, media)

    Is the library any good?
    Yes! I work there part-time on weekends. It's massive! (1.2 Million books!) They have subscriptions to all of the latest electronic journals, a massive collection of media (films and music), interactive learning spaces, research clusters, specialist subject advisers, an archives centre with old historical records for original research. I do love the library!

    Is the course interesting?
    I think so, as I was saying to another person on TSR earlier, the flexibility on the course is quite something. They have over 20 modules for you to pick from, so it's virtually impossible to end up doing a module you don't like.

    Any bad things?
    The only bad thing I can think of is the University's location. It's a beautiful spot of countryside, and has good connections to Birmingham and London (55 minutes by train!) - but the problem is that at the end of the 1st year, you chose who you want to live with in your second year, and there is a lot of peer pressure to live in nearby Leamington Spa (a 30 minute bus journey every morning, longer when you consider waits at the bus stop) as it's the 'trendy' plush middle class area to be!

    general positives..
    I've really been grateful for the personal tutor system this term. The staff have been fantastic. I wanted to apply for this scholarship/year abroad but I was nervous so I went and spoke to my tutor, she really encouraged me and offered me help and I got it! and since then all the staff have been really helpful and encouraging in helping me organise my year abroad and providing documentation. I can't be more grateful really. They've gone beyond their remit.
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    (Original post by screenager2004)
    Haha so many questions! I'd be glad to answer them!
    Wow, thank you so much!

    It does sound a brilliant course, I just realised on your profile that you reveived a first in your first year!! Well done Do you read very often to obtain such a high mark?

    In addition, which other options did you recieve for studying abroad, i.e. other international institutions?

    Thanks again.
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    (Original post by Kay :))
    Wow, thank you so much!

    It does sound a brilliant course, I just realised on your profile that you reveived a first in your first year!! Well done Do you read very often to obtain such a high mark?

    In addition, which other options did you recieve for studying abroad, i.e. other international institutions?

    Thanks again.
    I did read like a crazy lady in my first year, but I'm now in my second year and the course has gotten harder, plus I've got a part-time job this year so my marks haven't been quite so consistently high - getting a mix of 2.1's and 1sts this year. You do need to read a lot to keep getting those firsts! I really need to try a lot harder to keep up the kind of marks I was getting last year.

    Aside from Tokyo, there's also opportunities to join Erasmus (spend a year in a european country, I have friends also going to Spain, Italy and France, for example - for erasmus, you need an A level in that Language to go abroad).
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    Wow, I'm so pleased for you 2.1's and 1st are still very good!! And as you said, not many people achieve them.

    How regurlarly would you sau you'd read, and would this be sections rather than whole texts?

    Also, how do you do the essays - reading books and lecture notes? What do you feel worked well for you in receiving good grades..do you feel it has opened up more opportunities for you when receiving high grades?

    Ah, that is a really good opportunity to have!

    * How about works on capitalism, and topics such as globalisation and postmodernism --> is the department good in those?
    You said they are good in health in society and mental illness - what in particular do you learn about, if you know
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    (Original post by screenager2004)
    Hi, I can answer questions about the general uni life and the Sociology side of the course. Don't know much about the Law degree though!!!
    still going to Japan?
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    (Original post by Focus08)
    still going to Japan?
    I hope so! I'm nervously waiting for news from the International office at the moment. I still really want to go, I haven't been put off in the slightest.

    I would be so gutted if it was cancelled... I would be kicking myself for the rest of my life!

    I can imagine how grumpy I'd be when I'm a 70 year old woman: "When I was at uni I won a place to spend this amazing year at the University of Tokyo that would change my life but it was cancelled due to unforseen circumstances" - but at the same time, I can completely understand if it is cancelled; my thoughts are with the Japanese at this time.
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    (Original post by Kay :))

    How regurlarly would you sau you'd read, and would this be sections rather than whole texts?
    Oh Sections! it's very rare that they'd want you to read the whole book. They hand-pick specific chapters and sections that are the most relevant. If you read two or three chapters a day, then you're doing great. But you shouldn't read for the sake of it, find what is most relevant and helps build your arguments. It's about reading often and reading smart. Quality not quantity!

    Also, how do you do the essays - reading books and lecture notes? What do you feel worked well for you in receiving good grades..do you feel it has opened up more opportunities for you when receiving high grades?
    Everyone has their own little method of doing it that suits them. You get a list of 10 or so different essay titles to choose from. Usually one will jump out at you because it interested you, or you understood that topic the most.

    The things that would get me firsts last year was not only thinking about the essay question, but also think about how your peers will try to answer it, and try to challenge the assumptions of the question, but also challenge the typical arguments that other undergraduates would gravitate towards. Of course, to be able to do this you need to know the topic well yourself! As long as you read, and aren't afraid to ask questions to the teachers, you will do well.


    I think getting high grades does present you in a good light, I had a job interview last November and in the interview they mentioned that I'd put my first on the CV. The problem is now I have set myself up to do well and there's pressure to keep it up! There's no pressure to get a first, talking to my teachers (who have got Phds and gone on to become professors) - they started out getting 2.1s but towards their third year it just started to click and they ended up getting a first.


    I suppose what I am trying to say is: don't aim to get a first. You'll disappoint yourself. Aim to read and love the subject, and you'll a) be more likely to do well and b) come away satisfied no matter what your degree mark is.

    * How about works on capitalism, and topics such as globalisation and postmodernism --> is the department good in those?
    You said they are good in health in society and mental illness - what in particular do you learn about, if you know
    Postmodernism and marxism are both fairly fundamental sociological perspectives, it permeates all aspects of the degree as part of your analysis.

    They are big on Globalisation, they state it as one of their 'priority areas'.

    I am really enjoying the Health module this year - you look at the social construction and definition of diseases. How social conditions and natural parts of the lifespan become 'medicalised' - so as medicine becomes more high-tech, and we are able to explain things through biology, they become the doctor's responsibility (i.e. childbirth, male pattern baldness, alcoholism, obesity, depression)
    Then you look at inequalities in health: why certain countries live longer than others, why some illnesses are concentrated amongst certain races, why lower class people live shorter lives than middle class people, why women live longer than men, yet have worse health?

    And also the economy and capitalism in medicine, how drug companies invent illnesses or fund research to sell drugs (I.e. Halitosis was invented by Listerine!)
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    (Original post by screenager2004)
    Oh Sections! it's very rare that they'd want you to read the whole book. They hand-pick specific chapters and sections that are the most relevant. If you read two or three chapters a day, then you're doing great. But you shouldn't read for the sake of it, find what is most relevant and helps build your arguments. It's about reading often and reading smart. Quality not quantity!

    Ah, that is really handy they do that! It is good they purposely go out of their way to issue particular chapters. I see, so it's dipping in and out of relevant texts each week. Rather than the pressure to finish them. Also in the group sessions, does the tutor mark your essays? And are the groups big/small?

    Everyone has their own little method of doing it that suits them. You get a list of 10 or so different essay titles to choose from. Usually one will jump out at you because it interested you, or you understood that topic the most.

    The things that would get me firsts last year was not only thinking about the essay question, but also think about how your peers will try to answer it, and try to challenge the assumptions of the question, but also challenge the typical arguments that other undergraduates would gravitate towards. Of course, to be able to do this you need to know the topic well yourself! As long as you read, and aren't afraid to ask questions to the teachers, you will do well.

    Yes, I definitely understand, but I suppose last year showed that you had it in you, and now whatever happens is meant to be And like you said, it is very possible for things to stars picking up again.

    I think getting high grades does present you in a good light, I had a job interview last November and in the interview they mentioned that I'd put my first on the CV. The problem is now I have set myself up to do well and there's pressure to keep it up! There's no pressure to get a first, talking to my teachers (who have got Phds and gone on to become professors) - they started out getting 2.1s but towards their third year it just started to click and they ended up getting a first.


    I suppose what I am trying to say is: don't aim to get a first. You'll disappoint yourself. Aim to read and love the subject, and you'll a) be more likely to do well and b) come away satisfied no matter what your degree mark is.

    Yes, makes complete sense

    Postmodernism and marxism are both fairly fundamental sociological perspectives, it permeates all aspects of the degree as part of your analysis.

    They are big on Globalisation, they state it as one of their 'priority areas'.

    Oh yes! Thank you for the link You see the science section, when would you be able to cover that, i.e. ontology etc? In which module...

    I am really enjoying the Health module this year - you look at the social construction and definition of diseases. How social conditions and natural parts of the lifespan become 'medicalised' - so as medicine becomes more high-tech, and we are able to explain things through biology, they become the doctor's responsibility (i.e. childbirth, male pattern baldness, alcoholism, obesity, depression)
    Then you look at inequalities in health: why certain countries live longer than others, why some illnesses are concentrated amongst certain races, why lower class people live shorter lives than middle class people, why women live longer than men, yet have worse health?

    Ah, that sounds quite good. Are there modules on mental illness?Rather than general health trends and patterns?

    And also the economy and capitalism in medicine, how drug companies invent illnesses or fund research to sell drugs (I.e. Halitosis was invented by Listerine!)
    No way! Ah see You learn something new everyday!
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    (Original post by Kay :))
    Also in the group sessions, does the tutor mark your essays?
    And are the groups big/small?
    The tutor that leads your seminar will be the person who marks your essays, but the essays are all anonymous, so there won't be any favouritism.
    Group size depends on the popularity of the module, but most seminar groups have about 12 or so people in them. Fairly small so you won't get lost in a sea of faces, but you wont stick out like a sore thumb if you're quiet either!

    Oh yes! Thank you for the link You see the science section, when would you be able to cover that, i.e. ontology etc? In which module...
    They throw you into ontology and epistemology about two weeks into the course, and it stays very relevant for the rest of the three/four years! You have core modules in your first year about theoretical perspectives and research that outlines everything, then you develop and build on it throughout the degree.

    Ah, that sounds quite good. Are there modules on mental illness?Rather than general health trends and patterns?
    Well this module covers both. But University modules are very different from A Level modules. Although the module covers everything, you focus on what you're interested in and write your essays/exams on the topic you are interested in. So for this module we cover health inequalities and we cover theories of mental illness. I find the latter much more interesting so I've done all my work on that. I've barely touched the health inequalities stuff. You have a lot of autonomy to choose what you specialise in.
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    (Original post by screenager2004)
    The tutor that leads your seminar will be the person who marks your essays, but the essays are all anonymous, so there won't be any favouritism.
    Group size depends on the popularity of the module, but most seminar groups have about 12 or so people in them. Fairly small so you won't get lost in a sea of faces, but you wont stick out like a sore thumb if you're quiet either!

    Ah that is good. Are they able to mark all your essays, or is there a set amount? As I have heard from some uni's that there are so many students that they do not give extra time for marking..

    They throw you into ontology and epistemology about two weeks into the course, and it stays very relevant for the rest of the three/four years! You have core modules in your first year about theoretical perspectives and research that outlines everything, then you develop and build on it throughout the degree.

    Oh, I see, that makes sense.

    Well this module covers both. But University modules are very different from A Level modules. Although the module covers everything, you focus on what you're interested in and write your essays/exams on the topic you are interested in. So for this module we cover health inequalities and we cover theories of mental illness. I find the latter much more interesting so I've done all my work on that. I've barely touched the health inequalities stuff. You have a lot of autonomy to choose what you specialise in.
    Ah! That is very handy, so in the exam you can potentially pick any essay you wish?
    What are the people who are studying sociology like, and were there many high marks in your first year? Would you like to carry on with sociology as a future career...
 
 
 
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