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    I was just wanting to know what sort of work related postgraduate courses could I do with a philosophy degree from York?

    I've been looking at finance related masters programmes but they all require previous knowledge or a numerate degree, mine is neither. So apart from further philosophy is there anything an arts undergrad could do a masters in which would be something more vocational.

    Also would it matter much if I did to a philosophy masters in trying to find a job compared to a vocational course. I'm looking at jobs in finance, consulting but am also considering civil service work.

    Thanks
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      The internet is full of conversion masters from management to computer science. It is you that can decide what industry you want to get into. I think it would help if you had a masters in management or consultancy but it is not necessary. Take a look here http://www.xchanging.com/Graduates/G...eProfiles.html as you can see some of the consultants have degrees in social sciences.
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      Thanks for your reply cybergrad. Would it matter where one did these i.e. ranking of uni? Also you say it is not necessary to have a masters in management but if I were to do a masters say in philosophy then what could that mean?
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        (Original post by greenpen)
        Thanks for your reply cybergrad. Would it matter where one did these i.e. ranking of uni? Also you say it is not necessary to have a masters in management but if I were to do a masters say in philosophy then what could that mean?
        Well, you have to admit it helps if it is from a university with a good reputation, after all that's the reason why top employers run recruitment/career events in such universities. Having a degree from a good university increases your chances of getting more interviews but that's as far as it goes. As long as you have a good degree classification you will get your chance. In such jobs a second language is also a big advantage. Just make sure your careers centre becomes your best friend for a while. Keep honing those interview and psychometric/numerical skills, most employers expect applicants to do well in such tests before they even allowed to attend an assessment centre. About the masters degree, well if I was an employer I would be a bit sceptical if you had a masters degree in philosophy as well because this shows to me that you are dedicated in this subject and would make me wonder why you want a job in a different subject but that's my opinion. Do you really need a Masters in Philosophy? Is it going to offer you something more than your first degree? unless of course you like the subject so much or thinking of continuing with a PhD for academic reasons. If you want to go into the consultant/management business a Masters in a more numerical subject could be more beneficial to you. These kind of jobs pay attention to how well you work with other people, I am coming from an engineering background and we always had group projects during my degree. That's what got me my job. Do you have something similar in your course or outside the class, ie sports, volunteering etc etc. A Masters in Management/consulting almost certainly has group project assignments. The only problem for a Masters in management/consulting is the fees, they are around £8K for good universities (LSE is out of the question for the poor). Here is a link for a Masters in Warwick, it has good reputation and as you can see they consider social sciences graduates. http://www.wbs.ac.uk/students/master...quirements.cfm

        and one from Lancaster http://www.lums.lancs.ac.uk/masters/...nt/entryquals/

        When did you graduate from York? When I was a student there I remember they had an excellent Careers Office and if you were active in extracurriculars and career seminars then they would give you the York Award, something that employers really liked. I also remember many large banks and consultancies visiting the university to give out career seminars and look for future employees. Did you attend any of them?
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        Again thank you for your thorough reply.

        I guess you are right about the philosophy masters, although I do really like the subject but I guess that a management masters would be more beneficial overall.

        I am due to graduate in 2011, I'm in my final year and yes I am going to apply for the York award, although I didn't realise it was such a biggie. I also attended events held by banks and consulting firms and the responses I got from them were that you don't need a masters and you don't need to do it in anything specific but I guess it would be easier to demonstrate competencies from a management masters than a philosophy one.

        I visited the Warwick link you posted they say
        "First degrees are typically, although not exclusively, in a subject such as economics, business/management, engineering, psychology, geography, sociology, or political science. If you have an arts degree you may also be considered, providing you can clearly demonstrate strong analytical skills."

        I think I would consider my degree more of an arts/humanities degree, how could this affect my chances and how would I be able to demonstrate analytical skills?

        Also any tips for the whole application process?

        Thanks
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          (Original post by greenpen)
          Again thank you for your thorough reply.

          I guess you are right about the philosophy masters, although I do really like the subject but I guess that a management masters would be more beneficial overall.

          I am due to graduate in 2011, I'm in my final year and yes I am going to apply for the York award, although I didn't realise it was such a biggie. I also attended events held by banks and consulting firms and the responses I got from them were that you don't need a masters and you don't need to do it in anything specific but I guess it would be easier to demonstrate competencies from a management masters than a philosophy one.

          I visited the Warwick link you posted they say
          "First degrees are typically, although not exclusively, in a subject such as economics, business/management, engineering, psychology, geography, sociology, or political science. If you have an arts degree you may also be considered, providing you can clearly demonstrate strong analytical skills."

          I think I would consider my degree more of an arts/humanities degree, how could this affect my chances and how would I be able to demonstrate analytical skills?

          Also any tips for the whole application process?

          Thanks
          About the analytical skills, do you have any A levels in science? Even if you don't, your Philosophy degree must have some modules about analysis. I am sure you are using Reason and Argument a lot in your degree, this is a good analytical skill for a consultant. Just make sure you get a good classification and if you apply to Warwick do not get disappointed if you don't get in, they have one of the best and most popular Economics department in the country and therefore a lot of people apply there for the courses. Lancaster is also doing well in this department and have good masters and connections with the industry, not as good as Warwick but still a good course. Also, try some other universities from the Russel group they have a good general reputation so this might help you. I do not know your financial background but if you cannot afford such a masters have a look at Birkbeck http://www.bbk.ac.uk/study/all_cours...ssstudies.html you can work full time in the morning and study in the evening if you wish. Also, they have good connections with employers because many of them send their staff there for further training. Some of their masters need similar subject degree but if they do not accept you, then you can go for the certificate and if you do well in the modules then you will be allowed to extent it to a Masters degree (write a thesis).
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          Oh yeah we do do loads of reason and argument so that should be good.

          Concerning a good classification, is that simply a 2:1 and above or do they also take into consideration the percentage. I'm currently on an average of 63% is that good enough? And finally how much weight is given to one's undergrad uni and if weight is given then is York likely to work in my favour.

          Thank you very much cybergrad you have certainly been most helpful, it is much appreciated.
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            (Original post by greenpen)
            Oh yeah we do do loads of reason and argument so that should be good.

            Concerning a good classification, is that simply a 2:1 and above or do they also take into consideration the percentage. I'm currently on an average of 63% is that good enough? And finally how much weight is given to one's undergrad uni and if weight is given then is York likely to work in my favour.

            Thank you very much cybergrad you have certainly been most helpful, it is much appreciated.
            As long as you achieve a 2:1 you should be fine. Some employers don't look at transcripts but others do, most likely they will try to make your life "difficult" by picking out the lowest mark on you transcript and ask you questions about it. York university has an excellent reputation (that's why top employers attend career events there) so you should be able to guarantee some more interviews but as I said before, it stops there. It is up to you to make an impression in the interview and assessment centre. If you want to go into consultancy/management, improve your numerical skills (if they are not up to scratch) before you start applying for for such jobs. York Careers Centre has many numerical and psychometric tests, start now if you haven't done already. I know that the final year is the most difficult but try to make some time for such things. One problem that I see at the moment is that usually the recruitment of graduates for the next intake starts in mid Autumn and most applications have a deadline around January/February, so you need to hurry up if you want to get on a graduate scheme instead of going for a Masters degree.
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            Thanks, I have sent some applications off and done a few tests. What about uni's for masters, they ask for transcripts, so do they like employers ask for just a 2:1 or would they look more closely at the percentage. I guess they would look more closely at the percentage since they ask for transcripts. So seeing as I'm currently 63% where would I stand in applying to, say Warwick, for a masters.
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              Usually the universities will look at your transcripts only if you want to go for a similar subject at a Masters level. Lets say for example that in my engineering degree I had good marks for Electrical engineering modules but I had bad marks on Digital Electronics modules. If I now apply for a Masters in Advanced Digital Electronics I would not have many chances of being accepted. As long as you have a 2:1 you will be fine. Warwick is very difficult to get into because of the popularity of their course, even with a good science degree. Just go for it, you have nothing to lose. Who knows, they might want to have a course that takes in students from different disciplines, maybe you will stand out from the rest with a Philosophy degree, as I said you have nothing to lose. If it happens, great, if it doesn't move on to the next ones.
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              Beautiful, thanks for your help it is much appreciated.
             
             
             
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