Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Difficulty of installing new clutch (by yourself) Watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Hey guys,

    The clutch on my civics gone (1999) 1.4L - done around 117k since new on the original clutch.

    Just wondering how difficult it would be to install a new one in a home garage...

    E.g. what equipment would I Need and how exp is it?

    I'm thinking I'll need a torque wrench and some way to jack up the car.

    Thx
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    I would head over to http://www.clubcivic.com/board/forumdisplay.php?f=22

    They will have much higher knowledge than people on here of your car.

    You would probably need engine hoists and quite a few specialist tools, but I am sure it is doable, might be a big job though! But if you have garage space then it would be doable.

    I would say you would need a manual or a how to though and some mechanical knowledge, or a mate with some!

    Graham
    • Offline

      2
      Get a Haynes manual, mate. Will tell you exactly what you need and has a cute 'how many wrenches' system to tell you how hard to job is.
      Offline

      19
      ReputationRep:
      (Original post by ritchie888)
      Get a Haynes manual, mate. Will tell you exactly what you need and has a cute 'how many wrenches' system to tell you how hard to job is.
      Yeah they've got them in the library for most of the popular models fwiw.
      • Thread Starter
      Offline

      3
      ReputationRep:
      Yeah Reckon it'll be a nice little summer project. fwiw?
      Offline

      0
      ReputationRep:
      Depends how long you've got to do it...Personally I would do it over a weekend.
      Offline

      0
      ReputationRep:
      LandRovers are very easy to workon, except the clutch. Its a floor out job
      Offline

      2
      ReputationRep:
      Get yourself a Haynes manual - all cars are different.

      I know Fords can be a nightmare as on some models you actually have to drop the engine out the bottom of the car slightly to get to the clutch! Some cars are obviously much easier, but get the manual to make sure you do it right
      Offline

      14
      ReputationRep:
      A Haynes manual will not help much. Many parts may be needed to be removed to get to the clutch. You need to know how the different parts work so you do not cause damage.

      The only place to start is by studying engines in detail. You will need lots of tools.
      Offline

      15
      ReputationRep:
      Go here.

      http://www.honda-acura.net/forums/do...l-58-pics.html

      Graham
      Offline

      1
      ReputationRep:
      The clutch is clearly located between the engine and gearbox, so the g/box has to come off, which depending on space can require moving/tilting the engine. Its certainly not a quick job, but not reason not to do it if you have the time etc. just be aware that i might take a while and of what you might need, ie, dont start on a sunday afternoon if you have to use the car for work on monday!


      Daniel
      • Thread Starter
      Offline

      3
      ReputationRep:
      Thanks guys, cars gonna be left on the drive till summer... when I'll have a chance to fix it... will be interesting.

      Will I need to jack the car up?
      • Thread Starter
      Offline

      3
      ReputationRep:
      thanks gb... looks very relevant
      Offline

      15
      ReputationRep:
      Yes, so you will need axle stands

      No worries!

      Graham
      Offline

      1
      ReputationRep:
      I will very much need to go up!

      Ive got a pair of these ratchet axle stands which are really quick and easy to use, avilable all over with a range of brand names on them from about £10-20

      http://www.broadline.com.my/files/ca...jack_stand.bmp


      Daniel
      Offline

      19
      ReputationRep:
      I'd put the front of the car on wheel ramps if I were you - much safer IMO. Obviously handbrake on and chock the rear wheels too, with a set of axle stands about half way down the chassis for secondary support. You can get the car much higher, much more safely than you can with just axle stands and believe me, the higher the better when you're spending several hours under it.
      Offline

      0
      ReputationRep:
      Nowhere near as difficult as people make out, just time consuming.

      The easiest way to fit a clutch to a FWD car is usually to jack the front of the car, sit it on axle stands to hold the front end up in the air (Don't forget to crack the driveshaft nuts / wheel nuts off first)

      Drain the cogswapper's oil out

      Do one wheel at a time, take the wheel off, bottom ball joint off (This usually requires alot of hammering, they're tapered hence can be tight) and usually you'll get enough leverage to be able to push the driveshaft through the hub, next pop the driveshaft out of the gearbox. Usually they need to be levered out with a pry bar..

      Then do the same to the other side..

      Next take all the crap off that's in the way off the gearbox mount, put a jack under the sump with a piece of wood in between to prevent dammage, take the weight and remove the gearbox mount.. There'll probably be a bottom gearbox mount or a back engine mount, take that off too

      remove cables and wires which are in the way, don't forget to pop the gear linkages off

      Take take the gearbox bolts out, then drop the engine as far as it'll go on the top mount, seperate the engine and gearbox.

      The gearbox will be heavier than you think it will be, so another jack might be a good idea, depending how strong you feel.

      Then you're in, remove the old clutch and fit the new one, buy an clutch alignment tool, if you don't be prepared to swear alot when trying to locate the gearbox output shaft onto the clutch plate

      Locating the gearbox can be a bit of a faff, just be patient and keep trying, sometimes they drop on first try, sometimes they're a complete *******.

      Then put it all back together.

      Don't take that as a total runthrough, it's just to give you an idea of what you're up against, you should have it done in a day, or a weekend if you take your time and drink loads of tea...
      Offline

      15
      ReputationRep:
      Never support the weight of an engine on the sump, many sumps now are an alloy/aluminium and will buckle. Always take the weight of the engine from the top using a engine hoist.
      Offline

      0
      ReputationRep:
      (Original post by gbduo)
      Never support the weight of an engine on the sump, many sumps now are an alloy/aluminium and will buckle. Always take the weight of the engine from the top using a engine hoist.
      Havent you ever seen an engine sat on the floor.. on it's... sump? Is this not supporting the weight of the engine?

      What do you think the block of wood was for?

      I've jacked many engines in this way and not so much as marked them..

      Might also interest you to know that sumps are designed to withstand impact without leakage.. They actually go through extensive testing in all conditions where things are fired at them to make sure they perform to spec, they're also subjected to massive overstress tests to check they can withstand the weight of the engine, bacause lord knows someone will no doubt sit one on it's sump at some point.

      It'll take alot more than some careful jacking to damage a sump.
      Offline

      15
      ReputationRep:
      (Original post by Rufusw5)
      Havent you ever seen an engine sat on the floor.. on it's... sump? Is this not supporting the weight of the engine?

      What do you think the block of wood was for?

      I've jacked many engines in this way and not so much as marked them..

      Might also interest you to know that sumps are designed to withstand impact without leakage.. They actually go through extensive testing in all conditions where things are fired at them to make sure they perform to spec, they're also subjected to massive overstress tests to check they can withstand the weight of the engine, bacause lord knows someone will no doubt sit one on it's sump at some point.

      It'll take alot more than some careful jacking to damage a sump.
      Its bad engineering practice.

      I would always say use the engine hoist points which are designed to take the weight of the engine and some of the car, over the sump. Its not worth risking it, they are cast and although resistant to shock loading, stress loading not so much, they could bend or crack and then you are up ****s creek without a paddle.

      When the engine is out of the car, you should lay the engine over onto its block, higher surface area spreads the stress and loading points.

      Either way, its irrelevant, if you look at my link I put in another post further up, it is a step by step guide on how to do it and supporting the engine is not necessary I don't think.

      You should never rely on what something should be able to do, if there is an alternative, which there is.

      But its your car/engine/whatever.



      Graham
     
     
     
    Reply
    Submit reply
    TSR Support Team

    We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

    Updated: March 19, 2011
  1. See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  2. Poll
    Did TEF Bronze Award affect your UCAS choices?
  3. See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  4. The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.