Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    So i was thinking of becoming a biology teacher, i would obviously do a biology related degree, however biology is the only science i have at a level, would this be a problem for me to become a teacher? As, i would not have a level knowledge of chemistry and physics?

    I am really confused, can someone please confirm this with me.

    Thanks
    Muchly appreciated.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    No it wouldn't be a problem! I have applied for secondary biology with only an A level in Biology, they look to see what sorts of subjects you did in your degree and what your overall science grade at school was. Normally you'd only teach your specialist subject up to A level and the rest to GCSE, so I don't think you'd have any issues as long as you were quite strong in all three at GCSE
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    If you push the fact that you studied others at GCSE level - you presumably did? - plus maybe try to get some kind of experience, either theory based or practical, in one or more other sciences then this would look much better than just having a single science specialism.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Snowcloud)
    No it wouldn't be a problem! I have applied for secondary biology with only an A level in Biology, they look to see what sorts of subjects you did in your degree and what your overall science grade at school was. Normally you'd only teach your specialist subject up to A level and the rest to GCSE, so I don't think you'd have any issues as long as you were quite strong in all three at GCSE
    Oh thankyou so much! i was so worried! But, like when applying for an actual job at a school, they wouldn't think that this is a disadvantage, would they?
    What degree did you do?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Snowcloud)
    No it wouldn't be a problem! I have applied for secondary biology with only an A level in Biology, they look to see what sorts of subjects you did in your degree and what your overall science grade at school was. Normally you'd only teach your specialist subject up to A level and the rest to GCSE, so I don't think you'd have any issues as long as you were quite strong in all three at GCSE
    Actually, i think i have messed up big time! I was looking at courses, and most places want two science a levels, and i haven't got that (((((((((((((((((((
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Actually, i think i have messed up big time! I was looking at courses, and most places want two science a levels, and i haven't got that (((((((((((((((((((

    Helpppp!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Lots of subjects at A level count as a science, such as Maths and in some places psychology and sociology, if you have a non typical science I'm sure you'd be fine I did Biomedical science as my degree, so bits of chemistry and biology all thrown in together. Good luck with it all
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Snowcloud)
    Lots of subjects at A level count as a science, such as Maths and in some places psychology and sociology, if you have a non typical science I'm sure you'd be fine I did Biomedical science as my degree, so bits of chemistry and biology all thrown in together. Good luck with it all
    Really? So, geography would be ok for the PGCE?
    Oh wow, a biomedical degree, i wanted to that but i can't with just biology? How did you manage?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    At the PGCE stage they look at your degree qualification. Once you've got onto an undergraduate course that's all that matters! The biology course at university i just looked at needs biology at a B and no other science or it at a C and another science which it said can include 'chemistry, geography, geology, maths, physics, psychology' and i also found a biomed course that accepts biology and geography as the second science. You definitely still have choices! PGCE departments do not really care for your a levels just what knowledge you've gained from your degree as they do basic top ups throughout the year for your weaker subjects!
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Snowcloud)
    At the PGCE stage they look at your degree qualification. Once you've got onto an undergraduate course that's all that matters! The biology course at university i just looked at needs biology at a B and no other science or it at a C and another science which it said can include 'chemistry, geography, geology, maths, physics, psychology' and i also found a biomed course that accepts biology and geography as the second science. You definitely still have choices! PGCE departments do not really care for your a levels just what knowledge you've gained from your degree as they do basic top ups throughout the year for your weaker subjects!
    Oh really, i am like so worried, like i might end up doing a undergraduate in biology or something and not be accepted on a PGCE! haha, and oh this biology course, undergraduate right? which uni is this at? and omg a biomed course that accepts bio and geo? where!? , and oh i see, ok, so it doesn't matter if their requirements say 2 science a levels ? :O
    Where did you do your biomed undergraduate, if you don't mind me asking?
    And, where you doing your PGCE?

    Sorry for all the questions
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by diesha)
    So i was thinking of becoming a biology teacher, i would obviously do a biology related degree, however biology is the only science i have at a level, would this be a problem for me to become a teacher? As, i would not have a level knowledge of chemistry and physics?
    You wouldn't be the first Biology teacher who was clueless about physics and chemistry, i work with a few

    Seriously, if you are looking for a PGCE after your undergrad, they will worry first about your degree course, then about the rest of it. If you are going to be a Biology specialist, you dont NEED a-level knowledge of Chemistry or Physics (though obviously if you did, it'd make you a better candidate).

    Just as a word to the wise though, unless you end up working in a posh private school where you only teach your specialism (i have a few mates who managed that), you WILL end up having to teach Chemistry and Physics. I'm a Chemistry teacher and the only Chemistry i've taught this last term is to my A-level students.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by gingerbreadman85)
    You wouldn't be the first Biology teacher who was clueless about physics and chemistry, i work with a few

    Seriously, if you are looking for a PGCE after your undergrad, they will worry first about your degree course, then about the rest of it. If you are going to be a Biology specialist, you dont NEED a-level knowledge of Chemistry or Physics (though obviously if you did, it'd make you a better candidate).

    Just as a word to the wise though, unless you end up working in a posh private school where you only teach your specialism (i have a few mates who managed that), you WILL end up having to teach Chemistry and Physics. I'm a Chemistry teacher and the only Chemistry i've taught this last term is to my A-level students.
    i was so worried to be honest, i mean most of the requirements i was looking at were like two science a level, i was like oh my god!
    Oh i see, thats alright then!, and oh yes i guess it would make me a better candidate, but it won't mean i will not get a place will it?
    What, end up teaching chemistry and physics to a level kids? i understand i would have to teach it up till GCSE, and i am fine with that.. i think, haha, so whats it actually like being a science teacher?
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    I only did Physics to A-Level and I'm doing PGCE Science at Oxford. I've taught more Chemistry and Biology than I have Physics as well. You'll end up learning it as you go, and when you apply for a job you will have experience teaching all sciences.

    And to clarify, you will only need to teach Biology to A-Level, not the other sciences.
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by diesha)
    What, end up teaching chemistry and physics to a level kids? i understand i would have to teach it up till GCSE, and i am fine with that.. i think, haha, so whats it actually like being a science teacher?
    Oh, hell no. Just to GCSE, and trust me i've met Bio teachers who manage to screw even that up.

    Like any job it has it's ups and its downs..... i get paid to set fire to and blow stuff up, which is fantastic fun for any chemist and i like to think i'm fairly good at it. I'm lucky enough to teach some fantastic kids, however also cursed with some i'd not wish on anyone. Such is life and overall the good outweighs the bad.

    Its hard but fun, lets just say i really need the holiday (i averaged 12-13hrs a day every day last term), though the stack of marking isn't looking particularly enticing.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by paddyman4)
    I only did Physics to A-Level and I'm doing PGCE Science at Oxford. I've taught more Chemistry and Biology than I have Physics as well. You'll end up learning it as you go, and when you apply for a job you will have experience teaching all sciences.

    And to clarify, you will only need to teach Biology to A-Level, not the other sciences.
    Oh wow, so it is possible!, thank goddd haha, what was your degree in?
    Yeah that seems to be the case with a lot of people, and oh ok thanks for confirming that , thank you!
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by gingerbreadman85)
    Oh, hell no. Just to GCSE, and trust me i've met Bio teachers who manage to screw even that up.

    Like any job it has it's ups and its downs..... i get paid to set fire to and blow stuff up, which is fantastic fun for any chemist and i like to think i'm fairly good at it. I'm lucky enough to teach some fantastic kids, however also cursed with some i'd not wish on anyone. Such is life and overall the good outweighs the bad.

    Its hard but fun, lets just say i really need the holiday (i averaged 12-13hrs a day every day last term), though the stack of marking isn't looking particularly enticing.
    Thats alright then, and yeahi had a physics teacher at GCSE who had no idea about biology so we got the biologist for that topic, so i guess it depends.

    Sounds good!, and oh yeah those kids, such an off putting factor!, i started chemistry at a level, found it soooo hard, so i dropped it, i kind of regret it now, though when i think about it i don't think i would have been able to manage, not that logical minded, i prefer the whole biology way of things, but gcse chemistry was fine, guess that step up is reall big haha
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    Yeah, it's a real big step up, had more than a few dropouts this year.

    You are going to get bad kids no matter where you go. Teacher training is a lot about how to deal with that. Sadly most schools dont have the luxury of swapping out teachers that are less confident with a particular topic, you end up having to grit your teeth and get through it as best you can (if you are lucky you may have some colleagues who can give you some pointers).

    Anyway, worry about that Bio degree first, who knows, in 3yrs time you may not even want to do teaching anymore!
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by gingerbreadman85)
    Yeah, it's a real big step up, had more than a few dropouts this year.

    You are going to get bad kids no matter where you go. Teacher training is a lot about how to deal with that. Sadly most schools dont have the luxury of swapping out teachers that are less confident with a particular topic, you end up having to grit your teeth and get through it as best you can (if you are lucky you may have some colleagues who can give you some pointers).

    Anyway, worry about that Bio degree first, who knows, in 3yrs time you may not even want to do teaching anymore!
    Yeah hopefully the bad kids won't be too much of a problem, and oh i see, i see.

    Yeah, might not even get onto a bio degree.. tough times!, and oh i just have no other career choices to be honest, my a level choices are just so messed up and pointless :/
 
 
 
Poll
Do you agree with the PM's proposal to cut tuition fees for some courses?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.