Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    When I read though the SAT II Biology,there is a term 'bicarbonate' pop up and state that it is crucial for homeostasis.
    So I looked up wiki and dictionary to know it is hydrogen carbonate ion (HCO3 -).
    Here's the question, why it's called 'bi'carbonate?? There's only one mole of C atoms in one mole of hydrogen carbonate ions.
    Is it indicating sth else like the products for reactions???
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I didn't actually know this but from researching the bi comes from the latin word "bis" - "twice" which refers to twice as much bicarbonate ( compared to carbonate ions) is required to neutralise an acid.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    yes, it's a very old fashioned name. You will still see it called that in shops though (or the even older and quainter version - bicarbonate of soda!)

    Chemistry is full of historical name mess! acetic=ethanoic, acetylene=ethyne, suplhur=sulfur etc etc
    • Community Assistant
    • Study Helper
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by danhirons)
    I didn't actually know this but from researching the bi comes from the latin word "bis" - "twice" which refers to twice as much bicarbonate ( compared to carbonate ions) is required to neutralise an acid.
    This sounds an improbable explanation as sodium bisulphate, NaHSO4 cannot neutralise acids - indeed it is itself an acid.

    Although it would require twice as much sodium bisulphate as sulphuric acid to neutralise a given amount of NaOH. So, perhaps if the definition is flexible, it could conceivably be the case.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by charco)
    This sounds an improbable explanation as sodium bisulphate, NaHSO4 cannot neutralise acids - indeed it is itself an acid.

    Although it would require twice as much sodium bisulphate as sulphuric acid to neutralise a given amount of NaOH. So, perhaps if the definition is flexible, it could conceivably be the case.
    Maybe, a book I've got instead says it's to do with the fact that for each corresponding molecule (Na, Ca etc.) , there is twice as much CO2 than with carbonate ions.......
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What newspaper do you read/prefer?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.