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Maths and Economics or Maths and Finance Watch

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    I have an offer for maths and economics in RHUL and maths and Finance in City of London. In leeds uni they said I could choose between maths and economics or maths with finance (major/minor.) I would like to do a postgrad in something like mathematical finance or maybe just a straight msc finance.
    With this in mind which do you think I should pick. Although finance would be related to what I would like to do as a postgrad it seems economics is more respected for these courses. What should I do?
    In advance thanks
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    maths and economics.
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    Choose whichever course you would prefer. Personally I’d opt for Maths and Economics since I find economics more interesting than finance, but either way, neither will disadvantage you in doing an MSc Finance.
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    maths and finance, sounds like the more suited option for you, and i would say go with it, you still got the rigorous course of maths, so it balances out any negativity of finance (which is only really seen when taken as single honours). You may find taking finance alongside maths at undergrad, will help if you go onto do finance at postgrad, thought economics will be equally rewarding.
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    Has anyone gone on to do an MSC in finance in a top business school, maybe they could say their opinion
    BTW thanks everyone so far for your help
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    (Original post by thetaxman123)
    Has anyone gone on to do an MSC in finance in a top business school, maybe they could say their opinion
    BTW thanks everyone so far for your help
    My housemate does MSc Finance and I do MSc Finance and Economics, both at Warwick. We're both from Southampton uni; he studied Econ and Fin, and I studied Econ and Act.Sci. In terms of Finance modules, we both had Corporate Finance and Asset Pricing for the first term. Him having a Finance background didn't put him at much advantage, if any. In fact, for asset pricing I was ahead because I had done langrangean optimisation in portfolio theory in my third year Mathematical Finance course before. In terms of his other units, for the first term, they were basically watered-down Economics (slanted towards finance) units I was doing. For his quantitative methods he struggled with matrix algebra (e.g. in econometrics) and statistical theory. My BSc course was more mathematically orientated, so quite a few of the problems he had were simple to me.

    I think having a finance minor doesn't help that much because you can easily understand and learn things you're behind on. Whilst if you don't have a built up strong mathematical background, then this way round, it's harder and longer to grasp concepts and they will be alien at first (like learning a new language).
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    (Original post by Mustard-man)
    My housemate does MSc Finance and I do MSc Finance and Economics, both at Warwick. We're both from Southampton uni; he studied Econ and Fin, and I studied Econ and Act.Sci. In terms of Finance modules, we both had Corporate Finance and Asset Pricing for the first term. Him having a Finance background didn't put him at much advantage, if any. In fact, for asset pricing I was ahead because I had done langrangean optimisation in portfolio theory in my third year Mathematical Finance course before. In terms of his other units, for the first term, they were basically watered-down Economics (slanted towards finance) units I was doing. For his quantitative methods he struggled with matrix algebra (e.g. in econometrics) and statistical theory. My BSc course was more mathematically orientated, so quite a few of the problems he had were simple to me.

    I think having a finance minor doesn't help that much because you can easily understand and learn things you're behind on. Whilst if you don't have a built up strong mathematical background, then this way round, it's harder and longer to grasp concepts and they will be alien at first (like learning a new language).
    Ok thanks so i suppose the actual degrees will be probably all be suitable. Thanks a lot for the help.
    One last question though, in your classes in Warwick, do they all come from prestigious unis because I was thinking of going to leeds, but should I go to Southampton.
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    (Original post by thetaxman123)
    Ok thanks so i suppose the actual degrees will be probably all be suitable. Thanks a lot for the help.
    One last question though, in your classes in Warwick, do they all come from prestigious unis because I was thinking of going to leeds, but should I go to Southampton.
    Quite a lot of international / european students, so I'm not too sure about their university prestige (though the Chinese ones are definitely elite universities). There are actually two other Southampton students on my course...

    Leeds is more prestigous than Southampton, I would have thought?
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    (Original post by Mustard-man)
    Quite a lot of international / european students, so I'm not too sure about their university prestige (though the Chinese ones are definitely elite universities). There are actually two other Southampton students on my course...

    Leeds is more prestigous than Southampton, I would have thought?
    Ahh k, well it seems to me that Southampton is better for Maths and about the same for economics.
 
 
 
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