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Thinking of quitting work without notice Watch

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    Hi,

    I'm 19, went to sixthform but didn't go to Uni. I'm currently working full time as a care worker for service users age 18+. I've been doing that for 5 months. It was only meant to be an interim solution whilst I find a route into somthing I can build a career around. I intend to join the Fire Service at some point, and therefore can't have any permenant, long-term injuries.

    I've enjoyed the actual job very much but as an employee for my private care agency, I have been treated like ****. We work minimum wage in all weathers (I walk), we're not paid for the time we are travelling between calls, recive no working benefits (If I drove, no petrol allowance) and no sickness pay and they are constantly piling extra work on you throughout the day as you're working.

    Today I was walking between calls and ended up slipping quite badly on the ice. I thought I had just twisted my ankle and tried to carry on.

    After the adrenaline wore off I couldn't put any weight on it - I have a weakness in that ankle so I phoned the Office telling them I need to go the hospital and get it x-rayed but they said to see if I can carry on, so I went to my next call and by then it was very painful. I Ended up going the hospital, and thankfully didn't break anything but was advidsed by the doctor to rest it for 1 - 3 weeks with some light weight bearing as it was quite a bad sprain. He also advised I arrange some Physio.

    I phoned the Office, told them and the Co-ordinator said "Can you come in tomorrow?" and I said "There's no chance because I can't walk on it at all now, it will be atleast a week". So she kept pusing it back day by day and eventually forced me to go back in boxing day but was very funny about it. I'm very happy to work then so long as I can walk but I think it's very unlikely. The swelling is huge at the moment and it's extremely painful even with the painkillers I was perscribed.

    I normally walk about 15 - 25 miles in a normal working day. How on earth can I make a full recovery without any lasting damage when they're expecting me to go back in so soon?

    I know it seems extreme, but it's a cumulation of a lot of other things - how I've been treated today is just what's pushed it. I feel like just quitting and going straight to Uni to study Nursing. I'm ok for money until then, I've saved up about £5k.

    Anyone have any advice?
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    They are treating you like a mug but unless you've got a pretty well thoughtout Plan B I wouldn't advise anyone to walk out of a job at the moment. Though, I don't agree with the way they are treating you. Could you not get a doctors note or similar to say you are unable to work? Surely its illegal for them to be pushing you to do the work if its beyond your physical capabilities??
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    Problem is that if you quit without notice they may give you a bad reference, and you might need one in the future.

    If you're not well enough to go in then you just need to be firmer with them Im afraid. Ring them back tomorrow, and tell them you wont be up to it - gives them plenty of time to make other arrangements then. You can have 7 days off sick I think with self certification. Any longer and you may need a sick note. They have a duty for your health and safety so if youre not well, they'll just have to lump it Im afraid!
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    (Original post by tbm)
    Problem is that if you quit without notice they may give you a bad reference, and you might need one in the future.
    This is the only hangup I had, however, If I'm going to university for 4 years - I don't think it will matter.
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    (Original post by PrettyBored)
    Hi,

    I'm 19, went to sixthform but didn't go to Uni. I'm currently working full time as a care worker for service users age 18+. I've been doing that for 5 months. It was only meant to be an interim solution whilst I find a route into somthing I can build a career around. I intend to join the Fire Service at some point, and therefore can't have any permenant, long-term injuries.

    I've enjoyed the actual job very much but as an employee for my private care agency, I have been treated like ****. We work minimum wage in all weathers (I walk), we're not paid for the time we are travelling between calls, recive no working benefits (If I drove, no petrol allowance) and no sickness pay and they are constantly piling extra work on you throughout the day as you're working.

    Today I was walking between calls and ended up slipping quite badly on the ice. I thought I had just twisted my ankle and tried to carry on.

    After the adrenaline wore off I couldn't put any weight on it - I have a weakness in that ankle so I phoned the Office telling them I need to go the hospital and get it x-rayed but they said to see if I can carry on, so I went to my next call and by then it was very painful. I Ended up going the hospital, and thankfully didn't break anything but was advidsed by the doctor to rest it for 1 - 3 weeks with some light weight bearing as it was quite a bad sprain. He also advised I arrange some Physio.

    I phoned the Office, told them and the Co-ordinator said "Can you come in tomorrow?" and I said "There's no chance because I can't walk on it at all now, it will be atleast a week". So she kept pusing it back day by day and eventually forced me to go back in boxing day but was very funny about it. I'm very happy to work then so long as I can walk but I think it's very unlikely. The swelling is huge at the moment and it's extremely painful even with the painkillers I was perscribed.

    I normally walk about 15 - 25 miles in a normal working day. How on earth can I make a full recovery without any lasting damage when they're expecting me to go back in so soon?

    I know it seems extreme, but it's a cumulation of a lot of other things - how I've been treated today is just what's pushed it. I feel like just quitting and going straight to Uni to study Nursing. I'm ok for money until then, I've saved up about £5k.

    Anyone have any advice?
    I'm also working as a care worker at the moment as well and have been for about a month. Going back to uni next year to do my masters in social work, be careful about quitting without notice as you may need a reference from them to get into do your nursing as i know i need one for social work. Which company is it your working for? PM me if you don't want to say on here x
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    (Original post by stripy_socks07)
    I'm also working as a care worker at the moment as well and have been for about a month. Going back to uni next year to do my masters in social work, be careful about quitting without notice as you may need a reference from them to get into do your nursing as i know i need one for social work. Which company is it your working for? PM me if you don't want to say on here x
    I assume I'll get a job doing somthing relevant when I'm doing the degree though so the reference probably won't matter, then there will be my volunteering etc.

    I just feel so trapped in this job, I just don't want to go back. It's draining me now, and after today I'm just fed up of it.

    What if I give them notice now, for 2 weeks time?

    Thanks for everyones comments so far.
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    I'd quit if this is how they are treating you, it ain't your fault that you have hurt your ankle and working on it will inflict further damage to it if you don't follow the doctors orders.
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    Honestly, no job is worth more than your wellbeing.

    You sound like someone who has their head on their shoulders. In terms of the reference, I'm sure you will be able to brief the above to your next employer, and I'm sure they will be able to relate.

    Hand in your notice, being as polite as possible. If they are awkward, then leave.
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    (Original post by Roo Bix)
    Honestly, no job is worth more than your wellbeing.

    You sound like someone who has their head on their shoulders. In terms of the reference, I'm sure you will be able to brief the above to your next employer, and I'm sure they will be able to relate.

    Hand in your notice, being as polite as possible. If they are awkward, then leave.
    Would it look bad in a papersift?

    "Are we allowed to contact your previous employer for reference: No"?
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    How much notice do u need to give?

    I'd just give ur notice now and get a doctors note saying you cant work for the next 4 weeks or whatever and by then the notice for work should be up and ur freee.
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    (Original post by pink_flower)
    How much notice do u need to give?

    I'd just give ur notice now and get a doctors note saying you cant work for the next 4 weeks or whatever and by then the notice for work should be up and ur freee.
    Pretty much this.
    I REALLY wouldn't recommend quitting without giving notice.. you will need the reference in the future, whether you're giong to uni for 4 years or not.
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    (Original post by PrettyBored)
    Would it look bad in a papersift?

    "Are we allowed to contact your previous employer for reference: No"?
    Let them, what's the worst your employers can give back? That she walked out of our establishment without any formal notice. This is where you explain your situation above, any decent employer is going to be able to relate. Remains to be said:

    Wellbeing > These little fears
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    (Original post by PrettyBored)

    I phoned the Office, told them and the Co-ordinator said "Can you come in tomorrow?" and I said "There's no chance because I can't walk on it at all now, it will be atleast a week". So she kept pusing it back day by day and eventually forced me to go back in boxing day but was very funny about it. I'm very happy to work then so long as I can walk but I think it's very unlikely. The swelling is huge at the moment and it's extremely painful even with the painkillers I was perscribed.

    I normally walk about 15 - 25 miles in a normal working day. How on earth can I make a full recovery without any lasting damage when they're expecting me to go back in so soon?

    I know it seems extreme, but it's a cumulation of a lot of other things - how I've been treated today is just what's pushed it. I feel like just quitting and going straight to Uni to study Nursing. I'm ok for money until then, I've saved up about £5k.

    Anyone have any advice?

    Don't take any **** from your employer.

    Tell them you are not coming in and that is end of. If they ask you to come in or try and come in, just clearly say no. Don't cave in.

    As your employer they have a duty of care towards you and if somerthing happens whilst you are working e.g. an acccident that could have been avoided, they would be liable.

    Don't be pushed about.
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    (Original post by Roo Bix)
    Let them, what's the worst your employers can give back? That she walked out of our establishment without any formal notice. This is where you explain your situation above, any decent employer is going to be able to relate. Remains to be said:

    Wellbeing > These little fears
    I guess, but I'm male
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    Wait, you're aiming to join the fire service but applying for a nursing degree...eh?
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    (Original post by PrettyBored)
    I guess, but I'm male
    :facepalm:
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    No matter what you do, you must tell someone that you intend to quit a job. After that, don't come in. It's totally unfair that she is asking you to work on Boxing Day, especially if you are hurt.

    Just tell them you can't carry on and say goodbye.
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    Just get another job and when they phone you up tell them to **** off
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    (Original post by Lell)
    Wait, you're aiming to join the fire service but applying for a nursing degree...eh?
    Yes, I have enjoyed this job as I said. If I try Mental Health Nursing in a formal capacity with a good employer (NHS) - I'll probably stick at it. If not, I'm already qualified to be a firefighter and have good experience. Either way, I have options - The fire service simply aren't recruiting at the moment and like the Police, are very tough get into anyway. I need consider my future within the constraint of time.
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    (Original post by PrettyBored)
    This is the only hangup I had, however, If I'm going to university for 4 years - I don't think it will matter.
    Ucas applications require references too you know. So unless you don't intend on using them then yes throw your middle finger up to them.
 
 
 
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