Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hello forum

    Could you check out this 2 year program. Its the first two years at a community collage after which you may transfer to a university. I was thinking of going for it.

    Here is the link to the course:
    http://admissions.tamu.edu/forms/deg...ngineering.pdf

    Its a .pdf - you'll need Adobe Reader to view it.


    I have 2 questions for you.

    1. Whats the standard of maths involved? Will i be able to cope with it without a good maths background? Do they start start from scratch at the collage?

    2. There are two different 2-year courses. Freshman and Sophomore. I have no idea what those are and which one will i be admitted to? Could you tell me what they mean?

    Any help would be much appreciated =)
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    1. This may vary depending on if you want a BA or BS. Usually you'll have to take single and multivariable calculus, linear algebra, and discrete math. I'm having trouble remembering all the typical requirements, but I think some school also require statistics courses. When you start choosing your classes, you may want to consult with your school's math department. If you don't have the skills needed for calculus, you may want to take a pre-calculus class.

    2. You may want to acquaint yourself with these terms if you plan on studying in the US:
    Freshman: first year
    Sophomore: second year
    Junior: third year
    Senior: fourth year
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by farhanbaig)
    1. Whats the standard of maths involved? Will i be able to cope with it without a good maths background? Do they start start from scratch at the collage?

    2. There are two different 2-year courses. Freshman and Sophomore. I have no idea what those are and which one will i be admitted to? Could you tell me what they mean?

    Any help would be much appreciated =)

    1. I can't really say about the standard without knowing the course or your background . Certainly the computer part of the maths (using Maple/MATLAB) will be taught from scratch, but I think they'd expect some knowledge of calculus/linear algebra. You can get a course breakdown of the Year 1, Term 1 maths here. Everything else will probably just carry on from that module.

    2. Freshman = Year 1, Sophomore = Year 2. A semester is kind of like a term, in the US they typically just have two per year. You'd end up doing both courses, everything on that list in that order (I'm sure you can elect to switch some modules out). I'd assume you can only get admitted into the Freshman year unless you'd already covered all the pre-requisites for the later modules (unlikely, I guess).
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SaintSaens)
    1. This may vary depending on if you want a BA or BS. Usually you'll have to take single and multivariable calculus, linear algebra, and discrete math. I'm having trouble remembering all the typical requirements, but I think some school also require statistics courses. When you start choosing your classes, you may want to consult with your school's math department. If you don't have the skills needed for calculus, you may want to take a pre-calculus class.

    2. You may want to acquaint yourself with these terms if you plan on studying in the US:
    Freshman: first year
    Sophomore: second year
    Junior: third year
    Senior: fourth year

    1. BA? Can you do a BA in CS? Isn't BA offered for more general subjects?
    I think my concepts are messed up. Whats a difference between BA and BS? I know what they stand for but thats it.

    2. Ahh! Thanks for that
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mailmerge)
    1. I can't really say about the standard without knowing the course or your background . Certainly the computer part of the maths (using Maple/MATLAB) will be taught from scratch, but I think they'd expect some knowledge of calculus/linear algebra. You can get a course breakdown of the Year 1, Term 1 maths here. Everything else will probably just carry on from that module.

    2. Freshman = Year 1, Sophomore = Year 2. A semester is kind of like a term, in the US they typically just have two per year. You'd end up doing both courses, everything on that list in that order (I'm sure you can elect to switch some modules out). I'd assume you can only get admitted into the Freshman year unless you'd already covered all the pre-requisites for the later modules (unlikely, I guess).
    Well I have a Commerce background (eco, business) for my A levels. I did give maths in O levels but only because it was compulsory. Just wanted it out of the way... managed to score a D. (60%) Thats was the last maths exam i gave.
    And the course is in the link i provided.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by farhanbaig)
    Well I have a Commerce background (eco, business) for my A levels. I did give maths in O levels but only because it was compulsory. Just wanted it out of the way... managed to score a D. (60%) Thats was the last maths exam i gave. And the course is in the link i provided.
    I think you'll struggle if you don't do any preparation between now and then: maths is a really horrible subject to fall behind in. The maths content is pretty similar to A-level, going beyond in many places.

    MATH 150 (Pre-calculus) is a pre-requisite for MATH 151 (Engineering Math I). If you have a look at that page, you'll need to be familiar with everything on there. If not, well...

    It should* be possible to take MATH 150 in the first semester and push all the maths modules back, covering both Discrete (MATH 2405) and Engineering Math III in the final semester. Discrete maths doesn't really follow on from the engineering stuff.

    Otherwise, you might want to get some tuition or start learning as much as you can now.

    *: Check the course catalog or ask someone at the college.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by farhanbaig)
    1. BA? Can you do a BA in CS? Isn't BA offered for more general subjects?
    I think my concepts are messed up. Whats a difference between BA and BS? I know what they stand for but thats it.

    2. Ahh! Thanks for that
    A BS will have more technical requirements than a BA. With a BA you can double-major or do requisite courses for professional schools, since there are fewer requirements.

    If you're really as uninspired by math as you indicate, you may have some trouble trying to major in CS. Definitely take a pre-calculus class.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mailmerge)
    I think you'll struggle if you don't do any preparation between now and then: maths is a really horrible subject to fall behind in. The maths content is pretty similar to A-level, going beyond in many places.

    MATH 150 (Pre-calculus) is a pre-requisite for MATH 151 (Engineering Math I). If you have a look at that page, you'll need to be familiar with everything on there. If not, well...

    It should* be possible to take MATH 150 in the first semester and push all the maths modules back, covering both Discrete (MATH 2405) and Engineering Math III in the final semester. Discrete maths doesn't really follow on from the engineering stuff.

    Otherwise, you might want to get some tuition or start learning as much as you can now.

    *: Check the course catalog or ask someone at the college.

    Hmm yes that's the same reply i got from a lot of university advisers as well, advising me to take take some math classes before i start, i mean.
    I CAN do that but the thing is i dont really enjoy maths, i may get better at it but i'll just end up stuck forcing my self through it. Don't want that!

    I've been looking at some BA courses and am leaning towards that.
    I wont mind learning a foreign language or history. In fact i do enjoy history!
    What would you recommend? How much less mathematics would a BA involve?

    Texas A&M dosent have a BA in CS. Was looking at Utexas. It offers both degrees. Probaably not going to get into Utexas but i'll link you the degrees if you want to check course syllabus to help with my questions.
    http://www.cs.utexas.edu/academics/u.../degree_plans/
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SaintSaens)
    A BS will have more technical requirements than a BA. With a BA you can double-major or do requisite courses for professional schools, since there are fewer requirements.

    If you're really as uninspired by math as you indicate, you may have some trouble trying to major in CS. Definitely take a pre-calculus class.
    Ok here's the thing, originally i was planning on going for a pure games development degree. It seemed perfect for me, less maths content, more animation, designing etc... but alot of people advised me against it, telling me it was a path to nowhere. And that game developers prefer CS grads over pure game devs.
    So that brought me to CS.

    Been doing some research after your second last reply. Looking at BA degrees in CS.
    How less on math content are they? Will i still require some pre maths classes to be able to handle a BA in it?
    I really am trying to avoid maths that much!
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by farhanbaig)
    Hmm yes that's the same reply i got from a lot of university advisers as well, advising me to take take some math classes before i start, i mean.
    I CAN do that but the thing is i dont really enjoy maths, i may get better at it but i'll just end up stuck forcing my self through it. Don't want that!

    I've been looking at some BA courses and am leaning towards that.
    I wont mind learning a foreign language or history. In fact i do enjoy history!
    What would you recommend? How much less mathematics would a BA involve?

    Texas A&M dosent have a BA in CS. Was looking at Utexas. It offers both degrees. Probaably not going to get into Utexas but i'll link you the degrees if you want to check course syllabus to help with my questions.
    http://www.cs.utexas.edu/academics/u.../degree_plans/

    In the course you pointed out, BS and BA are pretty similar, just some shuffling of the non-CS subjects (the extra maths in BS is optional). You'll notice both are maths heavy.

    You *might* be able to avoid algebra/calculus with some sneaky choices at the odd university and still get a CS degree, but you'll be avoiding all the computer graphics stuff (there are still useful things you can learn!). You'll definitely have to cover discrete maths regardless.

    If you're set on working in the games industry, the graduate route might not be the best way for you. Maybe it's better to find a subject you enjoy and get there through journalism/QA/localisation, or start creating games, music, art/animation or levels in your spare time.

    I'm out of my depth here. Best of luck wherever you end up.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mailmerge)
    In the course you pointed out, BS and BA are pretty similar, just some shuffling of the non-CS subjects (the extra maths in BS is optional). You'll notice both are maths heavy.

    You *might* be able to avoid algebra/calculus with some sneaky choices at the odd university and still get a CS degree, but you'll be avoiding all the computer graphics stuff (there are still useful things you can learn!). You'll definitely have to cover discrete maths regardless.

    If you're set on working in the games industry, the graduate route might not be the best way for you. Maybe it's better to find a subject you enjoy and get there through journalism/QA/localisation, or start creating games, music, art/animation or levels in your spare time.

    I'm out of my depth here. Best of luck wherever you end up.
    Hmm cant rely on solely the gaming sector. Going to do a CS degree because i may need to find work elsewhere. And CS would be the best choice for either.


    A thousand happy tears for your help, friend! Much appreciated
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SaintSaens)
    1. This may vary depending on if you want a BA or BS. Usually you'll have to take single and multivariable calculus, linear algebra, and discrete math. I'm having trouble remembering all the typical requirements, but I think some school also require statistics courses. When you start choosing your classes, you may want to consult with your school's math department. If you don't have the skills needed for calculus, you may want to take a pre-calculus class.

    2. You may want to acquaint yourself with these terms if you plan on studying in the US:
    Freshman: first year
    Sophomore: second year
    Junior: third year
    Senior: fourth year
    Hey again Saint.
    Could you check out this degree:
    http://registrar.ufl.edu/catalog/pro...s/compsci.html

    Is this a BA or BS? It comes under College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, not Engineering. So should be a BA but i cannot find that written anywhere.

    This is the BS degree, which im not interested in, but linking so you can compare:
    http://www.registrar.ufl.edu/catalog...ompscieng.html

    I mean one would expect the CS degree under College of Liberal Arts and Sciences to be a BA, specially because there a a separate BS engineering one. But they both seem to be BS degrees, under separate collages of the same university. Whats wrong here?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by farhanbaig)
    Is this a BA or BS? It comes under College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, not Engineering. So should be a BA but i cannot find that written anywhere.
    Don't read too much into the degree honorary -- it doesn't mean much (as it happens, it is BS). That degree is more like a CS + [whatever] double major and is very similar to what other schools offer as BA, although they probably expect most students to chose electives from maths/science. Hence, BS.

    You have to look at the course content (required coursework): even though you might have found the CS degree with the least amount of CS / most electives, you're still doing three modules of calculus and some maths intensive physics. Is CS really the right choice for you?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mailmerge)
    Don't read too much into the degree honorary -- it doesn't mean much (as it happens, it is BS). That degree is more like a CS + [whatever] double major and is very similar to what other schools offer as BA, although they probably expect most students to chose electives from maths/science. Hence, BS.

    You have to look at the course content (required coursework): even though you might have found the CS degree with the least amount of CS / most electives, you're still doing three modules of calculus and some maths intensive physics. Is CS really the right choice for you?

    1. Why do so many people bring up double majors when im talking about CS? I surely will not be going for that. It does amount to double the load, right?

    2. What are electives? And if it does have more maths/science then how is it similar to a BA degree? That's pretty much the reason im going for a BA rather than a BS, because BA involves less maths.

    I dont know man, I'm lost in making a decision here. I dont want to go for a pure game dev. degree and not a pure CS maths/science degree. A BA in CS seemed like a good compromise.
    If your wondering, think i mention this before, I'll be aiming for the gaming industry. And from what I've read, they prefer CS graduates over anything else, even if the job involves purely animation, etc. Only thing I'm fearing is maths, have always loathed it, but I'm willing to put my heart into it if it will not make a major part of my course.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Bump
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What newspaper do you read/prefer?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.