Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    Why is it that I keep seeing people (usually teenage girls) who claim to be bipolar and claim to self-harm because they're undergoing some sort of 'emotional turmoil'?

    This stuff sort of pisses me off because people will begin to stop seeing bipolar disorder and self-harming as serious problems and will just lump it with the attention-seeking whingers I keep seeing.

    Basically, why do people think it's cool to be mentally ill?
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    My ex reckoned she was bi-polar... I didn't :pierre:

    I think a lot of people confuse being mentally ill and being normal just because they're exhibiting a couple of symptoms of any mental illness. Needless to say, it pisses me off.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Because it's cool.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Because having a serious medical condition is cool these days.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    They're usually just on their period.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Because then they have an excuse to be absolute failures in life.

    Let's see them put it under Disabilities etc. on an application form. Self diagnosis ftw. I blame google.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    I don't think people think the mental illness is cool, rather that the attention that they get from claiming to have such an illness is cool. Although, as somebody who has been through two of the most common things young girls "lie" about, I'd just like to say that they're so not cool. At all.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    Because some people are too stupid to differentiate between the norm of having highs and lows throughout the day, week and year, with the reality of manic depression, where you can go from being as high as a kite to literally suicidal in less than an hour.

    There are undoubtedly many people in this day and age who genuinely suffer from manic depression and they need help, but what doesn't help is a bunch of attention-seekers climbing on to the mental health bandwagon and claiming that their ordinary problems are extraordinary mental health issues.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I think everyone is a little bit bi-polar to be honest, in fact, is it even a condition? Doesn't everyones mood fluctuate to varying degrees? and outside problems amplify the condition?
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    I've been professionally diagnosed as having BiPolar type II and have self injured for 5 years.
    I'm also a whingeing attention seeking teenage girl.
    Who says the two can't go together?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Because people will use it as an excuse for what they are doing. I went though a bad patch including self harm and now can go from hyper to being worried, stressed and depressed about nothing. However I class myself as mad/crazy (as would a lot of people) but would never think to call myself bipolar. However, I bet some people would call themselves bipolar if they were experience what I was when I came out of my bad patch.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I think some people just don't understand what bipolar entails tbh, if they used a reliable source and did some proper research they may understand that it's not the usual mood swings everyone experiences, and not just going from being 'happy' to 'down'. Irritates me too, I've had 3/4 friends claim to be bipolar before, I don't bother arguing because the people who think this wont go very far in life, and if getting a bit of attention and a bit of counselling for it will give them a bit of happiness/enjoyment then so be it, they wont get much better I don't imagine.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I agree. Many people I have met claim to have had ADHD for example in their early teens when it is completely NATURAL to have a short attention span at this stage in life. Much of this is simply down to the natural variation in human personality that exists.
    • PS Helper
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    There is a lot of horrible self-diagnosis around these days, but it does screw up the people who do have problems.

    I have type II bi-polar disorder (luckily, it's now pretty well controlled using medication) and my last boyfriend wouldn't believe it at all. When I first told my current boyfriend he quizzed me on my medical history to make sure I was telling the truth as well.

    Madness.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Why patients are saying 'I want to be bipolar'

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/8609461.stm

    Mental illness has long been considered a stigma, with people often going to great lengths to hide the fact that they have problems.


    For many years, there has been a huge stigma attached to mental illness. This has evolved from the days of institutionalisation in the asylums, psychiatric treatments such as electroconvulsive therapy and media coverage of schizophrenia-related deaths. Given the stigma, it seems highly unusual that there is now a group of people who are actively seeking out a diagnosis of a mental disorder and want to be known as bipolar.

    Celebrity Effect
    Such presentations were rare until about three years ago.

    Dr Lester Sireling and I have looked into the popularity of bipolar disorder as a self-diagnosis. We believe the phenomenon could be due to increased public awareness through the internet, radio and TV, coupled with the willingness of celebrities to talk about their own personal experiences of mental illness. This appears to have made the disorder less of a stigma, and more acceptable to the public. A new diagnosis of bipolar disorder might also reflect a person's aspiration for higher social status and a feeling that by having the condition they too are creative.

    Indeed, the highly intelligent and creative Stephen Fry, who has talked very frankly about his own experiences certainly appears to have promoted bipolar disorder as less stigmatising and more acceptable to the public. Since he went public psychiatrists have been reporting more patients diagnosing themselves.

    One person who presented to us with self-diagnosed bipolar disorder had previously been treated for depression. She had also been using alcohol and illicit drugs to control her 'mood swings' and reported embarrassing and disorderly behaviour. We later diagnosed her with bipolar disorder. Psychiatrists will inevitably see more people coming to them with self-diagnosed bipolar disorder.

    'Desirable diagnosis'
    Not only has the celebrity effect increased public awareness of the disorder, bipolar disorder has now become a desirable diagnosis.
    But this brings with it its own problems. Bipolar disorder is a mental disorder that presents with recurrent episodes of mood instability of feeling 'high' (mania or hypomania) and 'low' (depression). It is a serious condition that may significantly impair relationships, work and social functioning.

    It is important for psychiatrists to make the diagnosis when valid. Conversely, it is equally essential to help people that desire the diagnosis to understand that having 'mood swings' or chaotic and disorderly behaviour does not necessarily mean that they are suffering from bipolar disorder.

    The new challenge for the psychiatrist is in either making or excluding the diagnosis and then sensitively dealing with the person who just 'wants to be bipolar'. The celebrity effect has increased public awareness of bipolar disorder, but now more work is needed for the public to gain a better understanding of other illnesses such as schizophrenia.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by najinaji)
    Why is it that I keep seeing people (usually teenage girls) who claim to be bipolar and claim to self-harm because they're undergoing some sort of 'emotional turmoil'?

    This stuff sort of pisses me off because people will begin to stop seeing bipolar disorder and self-harming as serious problems and will just lump it with the attention-seeking whingers I keep seeing.


    Basically, why do people think it's cool to be mentally ill?
    They sound more like emos then bipolar.
    They probably haven't met anyone that's bipolar, or have watched Eastenders.

    I think having ADHD, being bipolar, or being an aspie are the most popular ones to pretend to have/be atm.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by DesignFreak)
    Because having a serious medical condition is cool these days.
    :eek:
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What time of year is the worst for students?
    Useful resources
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.