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    I was just wondering. Since we all know it's best to consume foods that are low GI. I noticed that some foods such as Honey, Shredded Wheat, Muesli, Bananas, Whole Wheat Bread, Brown Rice and Carrots seem to be rated as high GI. I thought these were healthy foods with not much sugar bar Honey - (still relatively healthy)

    Any thoughts? Thanks.
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    If your energy levels are fairly constant i.e. not going through bouts of high energy followed by crashing after eating these food, then you probably have good insulin sensitivity as it's what you're used to. In that sense you probably won't have much to worry about, but I imagine you'll mostly be consuming the above foods with fat and/or protein, which will slow the breakdown and absorption of sugars. That's where glycaemic load comes in, though it's fairly impossible to assign a value to a particular combination of foods. Of course complex carbs take longer to break down and be absorped due to the number of sugar molecules that make them up which is why they are generally considered 'healthier'. I'm sure someone else will have a bit more knowledge about it.
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    Carrots having a high GI is a good example of why the concept of GI is close to useless. There's not much carbohydrate in carrot (maybe 8g per 100g compared to 45g for bread), so how fast it enters the bloodstream doesn't seem particularly likely to be important. If you want to consider something along the lines of GI, try looking up glycemic load.

    There are several things on your list that I wouldn't have described as healthy, but whether a food is healthy is a difficult thing to come to any reliable conclusion about.
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    (Original post by Advanced Subsidiary)
    I was just wondering. Since we all know it's best to consume foods that are low GI. I noticed that some foods such as Honey, Shredded Wheat, Muesli, Bananas, Whole Wheat Bread, Brown Rice and Carrots seem to be rated as high GI. I thought these were healthy foods with not much sugar bar Honey - (still relatively healthy)

    Any thoughts? Thanks.
    Honey is a better alternative, but still isn't great.

    Shredded Wheat when sugar coated or containing honey nut **** is terrible, and not great by itself due to the process used to make it. I mean, it's not in it's natural state. Bananas contain large amounts of fructose, and therefore as like most fruits, are very high in sugar, thus high GI.

    Most produced museli is dreadful for you, and contains all sorts of crap. It's definitely best to have porridge made from natural oats and whole milk and then chuck in some nuts/fruit if you like.
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    Not every food that is good for you is low GI and a carrot is an unrefined complex carbohydrate which is high in energy and low in fiber and even whole wheat bread and brown rice are low when compared to their white alternative
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    (Original post by a_t)
    Not every food that is good for you is low GI and a carrot is an unrefined complex carbohydrate which is high in energy and low in fiber and even whole wheat bread and brown rice are low when compared to their white alternative
    Yes and no. Carrots may have a moderate to high glycaemic index but on the whole they are relatively high in fibre (which in itself slows carbohydrate digestion and absorption) and low in calories so they will have a much less pronounced effect on your blood glucose levels than say the same weight of pasta or honey.

    It's important to look at the whole picture, glycaemic index but also glycaemic load and fibre content.
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    (Original post by ch0c0h01ic)
    Yes and no. Carrots may have a moderate to high glycaemic index but on the whole they are relatively high in fibre (which in itself slows carbohydrate digestion and absorption) and low in calories so they will have a much less pronounced effect on your blood glucose levels than say the same weight of pasta or honey.

    It's important to look at the whole picture, glycaemic index but also glycaemic load and fibre content.
    k noted
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    The GI only takes into account the type of carbohydrate and not the amount. For example, how practical is the GI when 50 grams of carbs from rice can be ingested with ease while 50 grams from carrots would require sheer power.

    The Glycemic Load is a carbohydrate/blood sugar rating that accounts for both type and amount of carbohydrate.

    Glycemic Load = (Glycemic Index x Amount of Carbohydrate in Grams) / 100

    Food: Jasmine rice
    Serving: 150g
    Glycemic Index: 99
    Glycemic Load: 42

    Food: Carrots
    Serving: 80g
    Glycemic Index: 47
    Glycemic Load: 3
 
 
 
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