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Coalition Politics: Why we shouldn't have it Watch

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    Mr Heath also suggested Chancellor George Osborne was out of touch with ordinary people, in the transcripts published by the Daily Telegraph.

    Mr Heath told the undercover reporters: "George Osborne has a capacity to get up one's nose, doesn't he?"

    "I mean some of them just have no experience of how ordinary people live, and that's what worries me. But maybe again that's part of our job to remind them."

    And Mr Baker said: "I don't like George Osborne very much."

    He added: "I mean, there are Tories who are quite good and there are Tories who are beyond the pale, and you have to just deal with the cards you've got."
    Source - BBC

    Surely all these Lib Dems speaking up about their "enemy" the Conservatives is undermining the Coalition. The Lib Dems are the ones that desperately need to prove to the public that Coalition politics works if they are to convince them to vote for an alternative electoral system. But how can they do this when they can't even govern in a sensible Cabinet. Where is collective responsibility? Surely this is even more important in a coalition - in order to retain the public's trust and confidence.
    The Lib Dems are just proving that British Politics is not made for coalition when their MPs aren't even mature enough to know that collective responsibility is key when staying in Government.
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    Welcome to Britain son. Nothing's working including the government, the people and pretty much everything else.
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    I think the problem (and the folly) of many pro-PR people is that they see it as a means of guaranteeing the Tories won't be able to govern alone again.

    That's a rubbish reason for a constitutional change. The change should be for the public benefit, not the benefit or detriment of a particular section of society.
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    (Original post by Summergirl.x)
    Source - BBC

    Surely all these Lib Dems speaking up about their "enemy" the Conservatives is undermining the Coalition. The Lib Dems are the ones that desperately need to prove to the public that Coalition politics works if they are to convince them to vote for an alternative electoral system. But how can they do this when they can't even govern in a sensible Cabinet. Where is collective responsibility? Surely this is even more important in a coalition - in order to retain the public's trust and confidence.
    The Lib Dems are just proving that British Politics is not made for coalition when their MPs aren't even mature enough to know that collective responsibility is key when staying in Government.
    Collective responsibilty is supporting something in public that you may disagree with in private. How is that not exactly what is being shown here?

    This is all being blown out of proportion. There are divides like this in any Government, and as long as policy can still be produced that makes sense and resembles what people voted for, why should we care? Ministers are still allowed private opinions.
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    anything to detoxify the millionare tories
    have you noticed, very very few, and i know there are expections, of not rich people and stuck up snobs who like the tories
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    (Original post by Flob)
    Collective responsibilty is supporting something in public that you may disagree with in private. How is that not exactly what is being shown here?

    This is all being blown out of proportion. There are divides like this in any Government, and as long as policy can still be produced that makes sense and resembles what people voted for, why should we care? Ministers are still allowed private opinions.
    They said it in public. They thought they were saying it to their constituents. The only place they should say things like this is in the privacy of their own home or in the Cabinet rooms. Anything can happen in those rooms but on the outside it should look like everything is fine.

    (Original post by sixthformer)
    anything to detoxify the millionare tories
    have you noticed, very very few, and i know there are expections, of not rich people and stuck up snobs who like the tories
    Are you joking? :') The Conservatives picked up a lot of working class and lower middle class votes at the election.
    Anyway this thread isn't about the popularity of the Conservatives - or the Lib Dems, it is about who and who isn't ready for coalition government and frankly, the UK doesn't suit Coalition politics. I would say the same things if the situation was a LibLab Coalition.
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    Our Politicians aren't any less suitable for a coalition than in foreign countries. This sort of stuff happens all the time in Europe as well, they just deal with it better, and I imagine their press isn't quite so sensationalist about it all. Our current set of parties does make a coalition more difficult as we only have 3 main parties, whereas most European countries have far more, however that doesn't mean coalitions can't work, particularly when whilst we only have 3 parties, they're fairly close ideologically.

    I see what you mean about collective responsibility, and this has definitely undermined it to a degree. It would be interesting to see whether a Labour/Lib Dem coalition would work better, but either way I don't think we can really say whether coalition politics is bad or not based on a few months of one rather hastily formed coalition.
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    (Original post by sixthformer)
    anything to detoxify the millionare tories
    have you noticed, very very few, and i know there are expections, of not rich people and stuck up snobs who like the tories
    cooee! Where have you been?
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    (Original post by tieyourmotherdown)
    Our Politicians aren't any less suitable for a coalition than in foreign countries. This sort of stuff happens all the time in Europe as well, they just deal with it better, and I imagine their press isn't quite so sensationalist about it all. Our current set of parties does make a coalition more difficult as we only have 3 main parties, whereas most European countries have far more, however that doesn't mean coalitions can't work, particularly when whilst we only have 3 parties, they're fairly close ideologically.

    I see what you mean about collective responsibility, and this has definitely undermined it to a degree. It would be interesting to see whether a Labour/Lib Dem coalition would work better, but either way I don't think we can really say whether coalition politics is bad or not based on a few months of one rather hastily formed coalition.
    I think you may a reasonable assessment here. This may interest you to see PR's effects in a Westminster system - there's negatives to it too.
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    (Original post by Summergirl.x)
    They said it in public. They thought they were saying it to their constituents. The only place they should say things like this is in the privacy of their own home or in the Cabinet rooms. Anything can happen in those rooms but on the outside it should look like everything is fine.


    Are you joking? :') The Conservatives picked up a lot of working class and lower middle class votes at the election.
    Anyway this thread isn't about the popularity of the Conservatives - or the Lib Dems, it is about who and who isn't ready for coalition government and frankly, the UK doesn't suit Coalition politics. I would say the same things if the situation was a LibLab Coalition.
    quopte from david cameron:

    "i like child benifits, i would never want to remove child benifits"

    do you think he picked up votes for what he is doing now, or the hundreds of lies and assurances he made up?

    do you not think the sun and the media, who are run by secret services had anything to do with influencing and controlling peoples views?

    open your mind, you sound intelligent don't be influenced, think for yourself, and if you have, then forgive me.
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    (Original post by sixthformer)
    anything to detoxify the millionare tories
    have you noticed, very very few, and i know there are expections, of not rich people and stuck up snobs who like the tories
    I don't know any stuck-up Tories but I do know many lovely people who happen to be Tories. Your judgement is worth near-nothing.

    Are you saying that 36.1% (or, allowing for those "exceptions", 36.0%) of British voters are rich stuck-up snobs? There are many people who aren't rich but do support the Tories out there...
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    (Original post by tieyourmotherdown)
    Our Politicians aren't any less suitable for a coalition than in foreign countries. This sort of stuff happens all the time in Europe as well, they just deal with it better, and I imagine their press isn't quite so sensationalist about it all. Our current set of parties does make a coalition more difficult as we only have 3 main parties, whereas most European countries have far more, however that doesn't mean coalitions can't work, particularly when whilst we only have 3 parties, they're fairly close ideologically.

    I see what you mean about collective responsibility, and this has definitely undermined it to a degree. It would be interesting to see whether a Labour/Lib Dem coalition would work better, but either way I don't think we can really say whether coalition politics is bad or not based on a few months of one rather hastily formed coalition.
    You can't apply one thing that works in one country and say it'll work in another. Because we are unlike other countries. We have so much tradition, we have the oldest Parliament in history, you can't just erase the hundreds of years of adversarial politics from our politicians and our people. We are a country still very much focused on the fact that society has classes - far more than other countries. A creation of more parties wouldn't work in the UK as our society doesn't have large political conflict to the scale of countries like NI or Israel or Germany once had.

    (Original post by sixthformer)
    quopte from david cameron:

    "i like child benifits, i would never want to remove child benifits"

    do you think he picked up votes for what he is doing now, or the hundreds of lies and assurances he made up?

    do you not think the sun and the media, who are run by secret services had anything to do with influencing and controlling peoples views?

    open your mind, you sound intelligent don't be influenced, think for yourself, and if you have, then forgive me.
    There are still child benefits for some.
    "Lies" - haha, look at the Lib Dems "We won't raise tuition fees". This is what you get when you're in coalition - sacrifices have to be made.
    "the sun and the media.." I don't read the sun thank you very much :') I read the BBC and openly debate matters of current politic issue in class with leading political scientist (they happen to be my teachers) and a politic students from a variety of different backgrounds and ideological opinion.
    "Secret services" well... that is a bit of an exaggeration of "bending the truth" and "political incentive"
    "open your mind, you sound intelligent don't be influenced, think for yourself, and if you have, then forgive me." Please - open your eyes, don't listen to the twirp of dissatisfied Leftists/communists/anarchists. :') You seriously need to read the news more, try sticking to the broadsheets though? Tabloids aren't that intellectual. :')
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    First off I'd like to point out that this is hardly unusalif you had asked the likes of Skinner, Meacher, Corbyn etc. etc. about their views of the Blair/Brown government then you'd have got very similar responses-there is always a natural divide between certain backbenchers and the ladership. It just so happens that this is slightly larger in this government due to the nature of the coalition and it provides a easier way for the media to present it as a 'split'. Its the same with the conservative government of 79-97, hell one of Thatchers ex-ministers wrote a book during her tenure slamming her, let along the behavour of the likes of Bill Cash over Maastrict...

    Secondly, AV wouldn't produce mre coalitions and nor is coalition government a bad thing (and these things certainly don't prove that it is). If this coalitons has proved anything its proved that coalitions arn't weak...
 
 
 
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