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    I've always wanted to study Politics but always with something else?
    I have also had my heart set on Oxbridge for a while, but never decided which of the two... Both of the PPE and PPS courses would interest me but I want to know which one people think is better?

    People who've done PPS, is the Psychology element quite sciencey, as I don't intend to take any Science A Levels and would that put me at a disadvantage? That's my only real question.....

    Yeah, long question really... what do you guys think???
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    PS3?
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    PPS... Politics, Psychology and Sociology
    PPE... Philosophy, Politics and Economics
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    I don't see how it would help you to work out what other people think. I did PPS but then I would have hated Economics, so obviously I'd never have chosen PPE.
    Surely you can work out which subjects you would most like to do by spending a bit of time reading about each component on wikipedia?

    They are very different degrees, so it would be meaningless for anybody to say that one was 'better' than the other.
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    PPS has the word 'Sociology' in it. Ergo, PPE.
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    Only one third of the degrees are the same, so you should really just figure out what you'd enjoy more, Psychology and Sociology or Philosophy and Economics. It's a really really big difference in course content, and you'll never get in let alone succeed at your course if you're not doing something you love. So which one some random people on TSR think is 'better' (which is a rather subjective term) shouldn't be the basis of your decision.
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    (Original post by JCC-MGS)
    PPS has the word 'Sociology' in it. Ergo, PPE.
    Sociology is an amazing discipline.
    I didn't think I'd like it, especially after taking it at GCSE. But I started the degree assuming I'd specialise in Politics, only to discover that the most interesting questions about society were dealt with by Sociology.
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    I'm just ****ing around, man, I think Sociology's a great subject.
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    As has been said, they really are quite different. Perhaps think about where you want to go with your degree? Whilst PPE, by virtue of the Economics, would hold an advantage if you wanted to go into something financial, the Cambridge website does describe one key aspect of PPS:

    The programme is fully accredited by the British Psychological Society , so students who select this option graduate with the ‘graduate recognition’ needed to pursue a career in psychology (eg clinical, forensic, educational, or academic psychology), provided they complete independent research projects and obtain at least a 2.2 mark.
    So if you are at all considering a career in psychology, PPS becomes attractive.

    To sum up: they are very different degrees, and don't fall into the 'ooh three-letter-abbreviated Oxbridge degree' trap. You really need to find a course that you are passionate about. I say this as an Oxford PPE offer-holder, and so my personal recommendation would always be PPE, but as was well-said earlier, you need to make your own decision.

    Oh and Merry Christmas :-)
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    Surely it depends upon whether you personally find Philosophy and Economics more/less interesting than Phsycology and Sociology?
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    I'd love to do Philosophy and I'm good with numbers so I guess PPE would be an obvious choice from the two, but I'm really interested in Sociology, and if the Psychology part wasn't scientific I'd love to study that too...
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    (Original post by cheese-lemming)
    I'd love to do Philosophy and I'm good with numbers so I guess PPE would be an obvious choice from the two, but I'm really interested in Sociology, and if the Psychology part wasn't scientific I'd love to study that too...
    I don't think it's overly scientific - I know plenty of people who didn't do great at science GCSE and coped fine with the course. Besides, it's only a quarter of your first year. If you don't like it you don't have to do any in second or third year. I'm not sure if PPE offers the same opportunity, but if you really like Politics you can study just Politics once you're done with first year. There's a lot of flexibility within the PPS course! I did only Sociology in my second year, and now I'm doing half Sociology, half Politics in my third.
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    (Original post by sammyrj)
    I don't think it's overly scientific - I know plenty of people who didn't do great at science GCSE and coped fine with the course. Besides, it's only a quarter of your first year. If you don't like it you don't have to do any in second or third year. I'm not sure if PPE offers the same opportunity, but if you really like Politics you can study just Politics once you're done with first year. There's a lot of flexibility within the PPS course! I did only Sociology in my second year, and now I'm doing half Sociology, half Politics in my third.
    So, I wouldn't be at a disadvantage for not doing any sciences at A Level... the subjects I've chosen are more Arts subjects
    English Lit
    Maths
    Further Maths
    History
    Politics
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    (Original post by cheese-lemming)
    So, I wouldn't be at a disadvantage for not doing any sciences at A Level... the subjects I've chosen are more Arts subjects
    English Lit
    Maths
    Further Maths
    History
    Politics
    You'd be perfectly fine. I'm the only PPSer at my college that did A-Level Maths! (If you want piece of mind, I took: Maths, FM, Economics, History and Law.)
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    (Original post by sammyrj)
    You'd be perfectly fine. I'm the only PPSer at my college that did A-Level Maths! (If you want piece of mind, I took: Maths, FM, Economics, History and Law.)
    nice one... does the stuff you learned in history help? it seems looking at it like more of a sciencey course over PPE which seems a bit more history englishy
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    (Original post by Bubblyjubbly)
    PPS (SPS as it once was) is the biggest joke of a degree in Oxbridge history and many, including academics and past students, regard it as being populated by thick students from 'disadvantaged groups' in order to boost their numbers and should not be regarded as a tripos subject. The workload is a joke, the level of technical skill required is an insult to an Oxbridge degree and is below A Level standard - you barely get to a correlation coefficient let alone anything more. In my final year, I did one of the most popular SPS papers for Part II - being an economics undergraduate we did the SPS papers in one year (like medics who did it for Part II) as opposed to two and even then it was joke, even the academics (including one A. Giddens) were thick. The tragedy is that most PPS undergraduates fail to realise how far off the pace most of them are in relation to their peers and the trendy academics who prop them up are no better.

    Sociology is a useless subject, employment rates for the subject are poor and deservedly so. In answer to the question, do PPE unless you want to have three years off and possibly the rest of your life off.
    What a balanced and objective post that was :rolleyes:
    Its clear that you don't have any actual factual evidence to support that other than the opinions of your teachers in the Economics faculty, and fellow students on the course.

    Whatever University one goes to there is always fierce rivalry between departments which cover any overlapping content. Which side a person falls in these struggles generally depends on which subject they happened to take themselves :dontknow:

    My personal opinion is that people should just apply for degrees that they find the most interesting. There is alot of work to do both at Cambridge and Oxford. If you don't enjoy the subject that you're studying it will be a real chore. I couldn't give a damn whether my degree is a 'joke' to other people or not. The reason that I studied it was because I found it fascinating and enjoyable. I would not have found any other subjects so satisfying to my areas of interest.
    I am very sceptical that anybody apart from Historians and Economics students at Cambridge have that opinion. And I'm not sure why anybody should care if they do.

    (Original post by cheese-lemming)
    I'd love to do Philosophy and I'm good with numbers so I guess PPE would be an obvious choice from the two, but I'm really interested in Sociology, and if the Psychology part wasn't scientific I'd love to study that too...
    I've just gone onto the PPS website and looked at what paper options you have in first year. They've changed this each year since I started so I couldn't tell you off the top of my head.
    Part I (First Year)
    Core:
    Paper 1: Introduction to politics: the analysis of modern politics I
    Paper 2: Introduction to sociology: modern societies
    Paper 3: Introduction to psychology: society, interaction and the individual


    Option:
    Paper 4: Introduction to research methods and statistics for social scientists
    Paper 5: International Relations I
    Paper 6: The development of human societies (Arch)
    Paper 7: Humans in biological perspective (Bio Anth)
    Paper 8: Human societies: the comparative perspective (Soc Anth)
    Paper 9: Introduction to computer science (Computing)
    Paper 10: British Economic History (Economics)
    Paper 11: Language, communication, and literacy (Education)
    Paper 12: Human Geography I: People, space, and geographies of differerence
    Paper 13: Human Geography II: Historical geography
    Paper 14: Human Geography III: Society, environment, and development

    So it appears that if you took PPS you'd be able to take two of Politics, Psychology or Sociology in your first year and combine that with Economics, Geography, Anthropology, Linguistics, Education or International Relations.
    This means you can have the Economics with PPS as well as the Sociology.
    In terms of Philosophy you would not be doing it as a pure subject at any part of the course, but if you specialise in Politics then you will cover Political Philosophy (which is shared with the Philosophy students) and alot of History of Political Thought. If you get into Sociology you would do a large amount of social theory: its compulsory in first and second year and there's an option for advanced social theory in final year.
    The second year Social Theory paper covers Goffman, Garfinkel, Mead, Rational Choice Theory, Bourdieu, Foucault, Habermas, Adorno and Horkheimer, Lyotard, Baumann, Actor Network Theory and others (that's just off the top of my head). So you'd definitely not be lacking in exposure to Philosophy. In Sociology you are also taught the Philosophy of Social Science which is very theoretical. Throughout the degree you have plenty of opportunity to bring in philosophy to your work as its highly relevant. Likewise in Sociology you cover Political Economy in second year and have that option in third year.
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    (Original post by Crassus)
    ...
    I was wondering when I would see someone who had got an offer for Christ Church PPE. Congratulations !!

    My advice (I am the Christ Church PPE rejectee :cry2:) which may be a factor in your choice to choose PPE over PPS is how comfortable you are in mathematics. I would argue that the ability to think mathematically is seen as a pre-requisite for PPE (performance in TSA, economics problems and elementary logic in philosohpy, etc.) whereas for PPS (as far as I'm aware) this is not the case. If you are not comfortable with maths my advice is to go for PPS.
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    (Original post by Bubblyjubbly)
    PPS (SPS as it once was) is the biggest joke of a degree in Oxbridge history and many, including academics and past students, regard it as being populated by thick students from 'disadvantaged groups' in order to boost their numbers and should not be regarded as a tripos subject. The workload is a joke, the level of technical skill required is an insult to an Oxbridge degree and is below A Level standard - you barely get to a correlation coefficient let alone anything more. In my final year, I did one of the most popular SPS papers for Part II - being an economics undergraduate we did the SPS papers in one year (like medics who did it for Part II) as opposed to two and even then it was joke, even the academics (including one A. Giddens) were thick. The tragedy is that most PPS undergraduates fail to realise how far off the pace most of them are in relation to their peers and the trendy academics who prop them up are no better.

    Sociology is a useless subject, employment rates for the subject are poor and deservedly so. In answer to the question, do PPE unless you want to have three years off and possibly the rest of your life off.
    Surely one could apply that same logic to History, English, Philosophy, Music, ASNC and whatever else isn't scientific too then? It's far from balanced judgement to make such sweeping statements....... is there even any substance to this alleged 'disadvantaged-background population' of students?
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    (Original post by Bubblyjubbly)
    I'm afraid it doesn't apply to the other subjects you mention, science has nothing to do with it. There is nothing vaguely deep or abstract about SPS and having sat in supervisions for the subject, I can honestly say that the level of intellect on display is at the low end, the kind of questions asked by SPS students would shame a five year old and the essays I have seen written by many of the students, which I borrowed to see what was required before I decided to take the paper, gave no indication of any kind of sophistication and were stuffed with childish slogans and what might be termed "linear chains". The essays did not require any kind of expertise, could have been written by a layperson with no association with the subject and gave no indication of any sort of long-term consolidation of advanced concepts - an average GCSE student could do the job. Having seen the material produced by those doing other arts subjects, I can honestly say they are miles ahead.

    SPS students are most often seen in the bar, have a workload that is well below that of other students at Cambridge and are notorious for being wasters - nobody takes them seriously. In fact, the course was so bad that in the 90s a load of SPS students ****ged off the course in Varsity, saying how it was even less demanding than A Levels. No wonder they had to rebrand it as PPS.

    Go into a lecture hall and look at the disproportionate numbers of inner-city oiks on special access schemes on the course, in fact just go and ask them what type of school they went to and they'll tell you, not that you should need to ask given their appearance.

    It's a frigging joke and it's not just the opinion of economists, it's the opinion of virtually everybody at Cambridge whatever their subject.
    SPS/PPS/PPSiS/etc: General Studies writ large?
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    (Original post by Bubblyjubbly)
    I'm afraid it doesn't apply to the other subjects you mention, science has nothing to do with it. There is nothing vaguely deep or abstract about SPS and having sat in supervisions for the subject, I can honestly say that the level of intellect on display is at the low end, the kind of questions asked by SPS students would shame a five year old and the essays I have seen written by many of the students, which I borrowed to see what was required before I decided to take the paper, gave no indication of any kind of sophistication and were stuffed with childish slogans and what might be termed "linear chains". The essays did not require any kind of expertise, could have been written by a layperson with no association with the subject and gave no indication of any sort of long-term consolidation of advanced concepts - an average GCSE student could do the job. Having seen the material produced by those doing other arts subjects, I can honestly say they are miles ahead.

    SPS students are most often seen in the bar, have a workload that is well below that of other students at Cambridge and are notorious for being wasters - nobody takes them seriously. In fact, the course was so bad that in the 90s a load of SPS students ****ged off the course in Varsity, saying how it was even less demanding than A Levels. No wonder they had to rebrand it as PPS.

    Go into a lecture hall and look at the disproportionate numbers of inner-city oiks on special access schemes on the course, in fact just go and ask them what type of school they went to and they'll tell you, not that you should need to ask given their appearance.

    It's a frigging joke and it's not just the opinion of economists, it's the opinion of virtually everybody at Cambridge whatever their subject.
    I'm astounded... really, I am. I do have one question for you though; is your opinion not swayed by the few - few being the operative word - supervisions you've sat in on? They can't be wholly representative of cross-study 'intelligence', don't you agree?
 
 
 
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