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    It is multiple choice, I know what the Answer is so please could you provide an explanation of the answer as I don't understand why thanks

    Which one of the following statments about electric field Strength and electric potential is incorrect?

    1. Electric Potential is a Scalar Quantity
    2. Electric Field Strength is a Vector Quantity
    3. Electric Potential is zero whenever electric field strength is zero
    4. The Potential Gradient is Proportinal to the electric field strength


    Thanks, I wont say the answer because I want to be sure that people that give an answer truly understand it (and so hopefully give the right one)


    Thanks for any help!
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    its 3. simple
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    I haven't done fields yet, but I think the answer is 2 - is that right?
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    (Original post by Shortduct)
    I haven't done fields yet, but I think the answer is 2 - is that right?
    No.
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    3 ?
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    Could you please Explain why, The answer isn't important. I know it can be worked out by process of elimination (or just getting the correct answer) But I'd like to understand why
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    Vaguely I think it is 3 because of the charged sphere thing...
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    (Original post by QuantumOverlord)
    Could you please Explain why, The answer isn't important. I know it can be worked out by process of elimination (or just getting the correct answer) But I'd like to understand why
    The simple fact that Electric field is a vector quantity and electric potential is a scalar should answer your q.
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    (Original post by rbnphlp)
    The simple fact that Electric field is a vector quantity and electric potential is a scalar should answer your q.
    Unfortuntely it doesnt :/
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    (Original post by QuantumOverlord)
    It is multiple choice, I know what the Answer is so please could you provide an explanation of the answer as I don't understand why thanks

    Which one of the following statments about electric field Strength and electric potential is incorrect?

    1. Electric Potential is a Scalar Quantity
    2. Electric Field Strength is a Vector Quantity
    3. Electric Potential is zero whenever electric field strength is zero
    4. The Potential Gradient is Proportinal to the electric field strength


    Thanks, I wont say the answer because I want to be sure that people that give an answer truly understand it (and so hopefully give the right one)


    Thanks for any help!
    Potential is a scalar, this is correct. EFS is a vector (think field lines), this is correct. Potential gradient is deltaV/deltaR; however EFS = -deltaV/deltaR so this is correct. The second last one is incorrect and hence the right answer.
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    (Original post by QuantumOverlord)
    Unfortuntely it doesnt :/
    say if you had a electric field strenght of 0, but say 2 opposite charges of equal magnitude seperated by a distance r , the potential does not equal 0..(try some no's if you wish)
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    (Original post by QuantumOverlord)
    It is multiple choice, I know what the Answer is so please could you provide an explanation of the answer as I don't understand why thanks

    Which one of the following statments about electric field Strength and electric potential is incorrect?

    1. Electric Potential is a Scalar Quantity
    2. Electric Field Strength is a Vector Quantity
    3. Electric Potential is zero whenever electric field strength is zero
    4. The Potential Gradient is Proportinal to the electric field strength


    Thanks, I wont say the answer because I want to be sure that people that give an answer truly understand it (and so hopefully give the right one)


    Thanks for any help!
    Google the faraday cage, it's a counterexample to (3).
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    (Original post by Farhan.Hanif93)
    Google the faraday cage, it's a counterexample to (3).
    3 is incorrect according to the markscheme from AQA, i.e. 3 is the correct answer.

    E=Q/(4 x pi x epsilon x r^2)

    There is no account of V in that equation.
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    (Original post by l4ith)
    3 is incorrect according to the markscheme from AQA, i.e. 3 is the correct answer.

    E=Q/(4 x pi x epsilon x r^2)

    There is no account of V in that equation.
    I said that it was a counterexample to (3) i.e. I was saying that statement (3) is incorrect.
    Statement (3) is the right answer to the question.
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    (Original post by Farhan.Hanif93)
    I said that it was a counterexample to (3) i.e. I was saying that statement (3) is incorrect.
    Statement (3) is the right answer to the question.
    Oh right yeah I agree with you then
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    (Original post by Farhan.Hanif93)
    I said that it was a counterexample to (3) i.e. I was saying that statement (3) is incorrect.
    Statement (3) is the right answer to the question.
    I guess he was referring to the previous deleted post
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    (Original post by rbnphlp)
    I guess he was referring to the previous deleted post
    Damn, you saw it hahaha! :sigh:
    I think there was actually some confusion with the post he quoted of mine as there was a lot of ambiguity in it. :p:
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    Ok, I am going to give a scientifically induced explanation and a simple explanation with an example.
    Scientifically:

    Electric Field is related to potential as:

    E=- \frac{dV}{dR}

    E can only be zero if V is constant .

    So what can be the possible condition as per above such that V is zero when E is zero? Is it possible? ..What are the possible conditions in which V can be zero?

    Or simply:
    All theyre trying to say is that Electric field strength is a vector quantity and electric potential is a scalar quantity. Suppose you have an electric field strength of 0Vm^{-1} acting on a test charge by 2 charge particles of 1C and -1C. The electric potential in this case wouldnt be 0, it would be 2V.
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    (Original post by Farhan.Hanif93)
    Damn, you saw it hahaha! :sigh:
    I think there was actually some confusion with the post he quoted of mine as there was a lot of ambiguity in it. :p:
    I just remembered the post so I didn't really read the other one close enough, sorry!
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    (Original post by l4ith)
    I just remembered the post so I didn't really read the other one close enough, sorry!
    No problem, an awkward-to-word answer normally results in confusion.
 
 
 
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