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    Evening TSR,

    I may have just bought a BBC Micro off eBay Can't wait to get started programming it... anybody got any awesome ideas of what I should try and make?
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    A simplified version of Pong.
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    A simplified version of Tetris.
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    A simplified version of Space Invaders
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    Mmm I think you could do a nice TRON light cycles on one of those.

    Just out of idle curiosity - what did you pay?
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    How much did it cost you mate?
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    A complicated version of Crysis
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    brush up on your BASIC.
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    Someone doesn't like the Tron lightcycle game.

    all those 14 year old kids who got BBC's when they came out would be turning in their graves if most of them weren't still alive.

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    Heh, I grew up playing a BBC Micro...
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    (Original post by Stringer987)
    How much did it cost you mate?
    About £50 on eBay
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      (Original post by gesiwuj)
      Evening TSR,

      I may have just bought a BBC Micro off eBay Can't wait to get started programming it... anybody got any awesome ideas of what I should try and make?
      Bootstrap GCC 4 onto it. I might do that with my Commodore 64 when I find room to set it up - I've even got a full-size floppy drive and printer for it. By full-size floppy drive, of course, I'm not referring to the 5.25" disks; I'm referring to the drive unit itself... it's the approximate size of a VCR :awesome:. And the printer appears to be some form of dot matrix, though I'm not sure if I'll be able to get it working.

      Anyway, I'd do that. Then, when GCC works, port a BSD to it, build a hard disc bridge for it and use it as a webserver. Or a station to run Avida.
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        Excellent choice, sir. I remember when we used to have one of those back in about 1990 or so... fun times You might want to track down some old games like the original Elite.

        That said, I never programmed for it. However, I know people who did and apparently you can achieve pretty decent results if you learn the language well. I've actually got an old BBC BASIC manual lying around presumably from when my dad tinkered with it back in the day.
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        (Original post by Javindo)
        A complicated version of Crysis
        ^This
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        Kind of a waste now unless you want some hardcore nostalgia...
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        congrats on the excellent purchase. Probably best to start off with some simple programs and work your way up to more complicated things. And enjoy the super fast boot up time (OS booted before the screens warmed up)
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        (Original post by mfaxford)
        congrats on the excellent purchase. Probably best to start off with some simple programs and work your way up to more complicated things. And enjoy the super fast boot up time (OS booted before the screens warmed up)
        yeah - the OS wont turn itself to crap and need a reinstall every few months either.

        The BBC BASIC interpreter has an inline assembler too IIRC which is quite an unusual featurette.
       
       
       
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