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    The rational for the fee increase is the country is broke, according to the tories anyway.

    At some point, the country will have paid off most of its debt and can afford to fund higher education at the pre increase level. If that is the case, the country will have several years of graduates with big debts followed by graduates with far lower debts because the fees would have come down.
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    It's unlikely they'll change it.

    Even when the country isn't struggling - if the system works and people aren't complaining so much... they'll just leave it.
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    well they say anything's possible... but basically no - the fees are going to stay up forever.
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    Not a chance. It's all about what people will accept. Riots aside, people will learn to live with 9k/year fees. This is a guaranteed source of income to the govt, they'd be mad to lower it again.
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    The purpose of the recent cuts program is to reduce the "structural" deficit, namely the part of the deficit that won't disappear once the economic situation improves and tax revenues increase/social security spending lowers etc, so yes it will be permanent.
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    A tory government are unlikely to change it back (or scale it down), I believe that a Labour government or Lib Dem government (that won't be happening for a while) might revise the fees down as the economy recovers, but probably not to the 3-and-a-bit-thousand pounds a year that they were this year - I believe that a downward revision would only drop the fees to roughly a £6,000 p/a rate.

    Any decrease in fees will have to be met by an increase in public spending on universities (subsidising the decrease).


    ...I am an optimist though
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    The raising of fees has nothing to do with the economy of the country. It was down to political dogma by Labour and the Tories who thought expansion would be unfair on taxpayers and it was fairer to make the users pay for it. It would have happened without the crash.
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    (Original post by darigan)
    I believe that a Labour government ... might revise the fees down as the economy recovers,
    Not a chance!
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    (Original post by Maker)
    The rational for the fee increase is the country is broke, according to the tories anyway.

    At some point, the country will have paid off most of its debt and can afford to fund higher education at the pre increase level. If that is the case, the country will have several years of graduates with big debts followed by graduates with far lower debts because the fees would have come down.
    The rationale is much wider than that.


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    Do you know how much debt the country is in? It won't be paid of in mine and your life time, that's for sure.
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    No- and it's probably going to go up and up because of inflation- but I doubt it will ever go down again.
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    If it works, which it will do as those who really want to go to uni will probably pay whatever amount to go, then it will stay. I think it will take a very big demo, not a few tens of thousands, hundreds of thousands of protestors for the fee increase to be abolished.

    (Original post by simontinsley)
    The rationale is much wider than that.


    Hey, you go to the same college as the Cenotaph flag swinger guy, right?
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    I don't think so but even so the question is a good one since the economic crisis IS temporary.
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    (Original post by yahyahyahs)
    Hey, you go to the same college as the Cenotaph flag swinger guy, right?
    Indeed, I haven't seen him around though - most 2nd years live out of college. First I'd heard of him was this incident.
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    Lol, no.

    We've been in debt since the second world war haven't we? Infact we probably were before then what with WWI and the Depression.
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    Historically speaking it's extremely improbable that Britain will ever pay off its debt. Default is more likely, but the government are trying to avoid it and will probably succeed. Either way, the present government isn't planning to pay anything back: just reduce the rate at which the amount of debt increases. You might think that economic growth will eventually remove the deficit - but it's more likely that spending will just increase, especially as many programmes grow naturally in line with growth rather than inflation anyway.

    The only way that mass university attendance can be subsidised sustainably is if there were a permanent increase in the rate of taxation. Rightly or wrongly, people think tax is already about as high as it can get without causing more harm than good by driving wealth creation off-shore. And in any case, what's the point subsidising universities with tax revenue, when the beneficiaries of it are the same people who will pay the tax? The only people it's really subsidising then are people doing useless degrees.


    And happy christmas
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    This is only the start.

    Wait until Cammy & Clegg decide that the cuts are not strong enough and deeper cuts have to be made. This will come after the next election. They will campaign saying that the deficit is being cut into fine and we are on the right path - this will be backed up by the ONS (bull****ters) and then after re-elected they will say that the forecast was slightly wrong as it didn't account for a number of things and therefore we'll face harsher cuts - even though, we're all supposed to be in this together.

    :facepalm:

    Then many universities will shut down and a dozen fully privatised institutions will open, as in America - Harvard etc.., and only the extremely wealthy will be able to attend such places.

    The poorer or less well off and middle class will have to compete tenfold for the small amount of state universities left over which means a lot from working/middle class backgrounds will miss out or have to wait until the following year to apply when more spaces open up.

    The universities available to those less well off won't be as good as the funding will be lower than the privatised universities meaning those from a rich background will get a better education due to privatised institutions being funded better due to higher tuition fees.

    Before you call me a labour follower, I am not. I follow no party as all 3 main parties are compulsive liars - I'll be voting for a smaller party (not the BNP). One of the others more than likely depending on the policies they put forward pre election next time round.
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    Labour will lower it eventually.
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    (Original post by Dekota-XS)
    Do you know how much debt the country is in? It won't be paid of in mine and your life time, that's for sure.
    No, because nobody has any intention of paying any of it off.

    We never have and never will.
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    (Original post by Teveth)
    Labour will lower it eventually.
    Labour is all about reducing tax for the middle class?

    Thats disgusting.
 
 
 
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