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If you get a conditional offer of BBB and get ABC would they still accept you? Watch

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    I mean it is the same number of UCAS points...

    Or if you got A*BC, that is even better.

    Is a university still likely to accept you if you donor get the exact grades?
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    think it depends on which uni it is and how popular the course is.
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    They don't have to accept you since you still technically didn't meet the offer. It would be a bit harsh not to, especially if you got something like AAC, but whether they will or not depends completely on the uni and course.
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      Suppose it depends on what the C is in.
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      Check the uni's website(not ucas, as some courses have changed, without ucas being updated),ring the uni, it really depends if the offer is based on ucas points or grades
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      As far as I know, and I've not been in the system for a few years, you sometimes are given the offer containing a condition where one of the subjects must be a B or above. If that one is a C or below then they're more likely to reject you.
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      I know someone who wasn't accepted by Liverpool when he got AAC instead of ABB - the C being in an unrelated subject to his degree. Obviously he was furious and very confused as to why they didn't accept him. Depends on the uni though, and probably the competitiveness of the course. Often universities of that standard (BBB+) want to make sure their candidates have Bs in everything rather than being amazing at one or two subjects and poorer at another. Sounds harsh, but universities want well rounded students and due to the added competitiveness for '11 applicants things certainly won't get any easier. As someone else has said, technically you aren't meeting your offer so universities do have every right to not accept you on that basis I'm afraid
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      I think it depends on the university and the competitiveness of the course, etc. But this happened to my friend, and on their UCAS it said application unsuccessful or something on results day, but they appealed saying they had the right number of UCAS points and got in
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      to be honest, that's the last thing you want happening, especially this year with everyone and their cat applying
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      Depends if you're offer asks for 300 points and a "Grade" in a certain subject. As long as you get those points and that grade/higher, they'll accept you.
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      (Original post by Xhotas)
      Depends if you're offer asks for 300 points and a "Grade" in a certain subject. As long as you get those points and that grade/higher, they'll accept you.
      In that case the offer will say "300 UCAS points from three GCE A-levels", and ABC, AAC, A*A*D etc are acceptable. If the offer says "BBB from three GCE A-levels" they don't have to accept you with grades ABC, AAC, etc. If it's a points-based offer, it will say so.
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      Sadly, it depends on the university - this happened to a friend of mine this year and they said no. If it happens to anyone, it really is the universities loss.
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      Not necessarily. I got rejected by King's, got BBB missed a B by 6 marks in history, totally unrelated to pharmacology, and they wanted an B in AS Biology and I got a really high A. They can be fined for having too many people on their courses, so maybe if a lot of people missed their offer/turned them down and it wasn't a very competitive couse they might be a bit looser.
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      (Original post by Elrobi)
      Sadly, it depends on the university - this happened to a friend of mine this year and they said no. If it happens to anyone, it really is the universities loss.
      Not necessarily, for this reason:

      (Original post by microfatcat)
      They can be fined for having too many people on their courses
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      It's due to the fact that they're giving a set amount of funding for a set amount of places and they're fined if they go over that number.

      So basically, you've got to hope everyone else applying did really badly so you're more likely to be one of those lucky people who still get let in.

      Unfortunately I would think this year especially you'll be unlikely to get in this way - I know three people who didn't get in because of this (and they got A*s). You're more likely to be let in if you've deferred entry though, in theory, as the fining issue doesn't apply so it's more down to the uni to decide.
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      It really depends on the Course, Uni and what you get the C in. A*BC for medicine where the 'C' is in Chemistry, for instance, might cause problems.

      Worth asking the Unis?
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      Like everyone said, it depends on the uni's policy, the course you applied for, and how many other people actually did meet their offer, as most unis typically give out more conditional offers than they have spots, because they know that some people will obviously miss their offer conditions. Best bet would be to strive for BBB and contact the university if you get one mark off. Best of luck!
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      Depends on the uni and what they offer. Some uni for example will give you two condition offers of either for example of getting BBB or ABC. Some will say only BBB, while others will say only ABC. It happens.
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      If you don't satisfy the offer in its entirety they do not have to accept you, and it is not rare that the don't.
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      It depends on the university and how popular the course is. It might become stricter now more and more people are going to university.

      SOAS (my firm) rejected me with ABC for not meeting my BBB offer and that was 3 years ago now...
     
     
     
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