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    I know how to answer questions. I'm not bad at Maths. I'm aiming for an A*. (OCR maths core 1)

    But I lose marks easily just by making pathetically stupid mistakes that I don't pick up on when I check through. In my mock I dropped to 55/72. I should have only dropped 2 marks but due to mistakes like:
    - forgetting to multiply out one term
    - adding where there was a minus sign
    - differentiating 2x^3 + 2x^2 + 2 as 6x^2 + 4x + 2 (...huh?)
    - writing y-y1=m(x-x1) then putting y1 into x1 and x1 into y1
    - 6*6=32
    ...I ended up with a B. That was the Jun '10 paper; it really freaked me out. I get the formula, I get the application, I get the reasoning. But I also get the easy bits... wrong. And I don't notice when I read through. I'm supposed to be teaching revision sessions to some of my friends yet I can't even do the simple stuff.

    Does anybody have any tips to make sure I pick up on these mistakes before handing it in?
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    You need to do more than just read through. You need to actively check that your answers fit the question. There are various ways of doing this. For example if you wanted to check that one expression is equal to another then substitute any variables with a number eg 5 and then evaluate the expressions. After C1 when you have a calculator this is much easier.

    You can check that an equation for a line is correct by seeing if any points given are actually on the line. If you are asked to calculate an angle then since a level diagrams are often drawn to scale then you can check your answer with a protractor. You could repeat your calculations but using approximate values. Sometimes it may even be necessary to answer a question again but in rough.

    Also in later exams when you can use a graphical calculator, you could evaluate integrals with it to check your answers.

    This may take up a lot of time so prioritise checking answers that you feel you were more likely to have got wrong or where you can check a large amount of workings by doing a quick check on the final answer.
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    (Original post by Contrad!ction.)
    I know how to answer questions. I'm not bad at Maths. I'm aiming for an A*. (OCR maths core 1)

    But I lose marks easily just by making pathetically stupid mistakes that I don't pick up on when I check through. In my mock I dropped to 55/72. I should have only dropped 2 marks but due to mistakes like:
    - forgetting to multiply out one term
    - adding where there was a minus sign
    - differentiating 2x^3 + 2x^2 + 2 as 6x^2 + 4x + 2 (...huh?)
    - writing y-y1=m(x-x1) then putting y1 into x1 and x1 into y1
    - 6*6=32
    ...I ended up with a B. That was the Jun '10 paper; it really freaked me out. I get the formula, I get the application, I get the reasoning. But I also get the easy bits... wrong. And I don't notice when I read through. I'm supposed to be teaching revision sessions to some of my friends yet I can't even do the simple stuff.

    Does anybody have any tips to make sure I pick up on these mistakes before handing it in?
    You need to check your work.

    The highest grade possible on Core 1 is an A by the way (just so you don't get disappointed!).
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    (Original post by Mr M)
    You need to check your work.

    The highest grade possible on Core 1 is an A by the way (just so you don't get disappointed!).
    I suppose I should have made it clearer in my OP that I was looking for checking techniques. I've found some here; I like the idea of just doing each line twice, and using the answer to get back to the question. Sometimes my mistakes are just a case of needing to RTFQ properly.

    I know about the A* thing being (I think 80% overall?) 90% at A2 - but it's more for myself because I know I'll panic if I get to A2 having got lower than 90% at my AS units - kind of an 'I couldn't do it on the easy ones; how the hell do I do it on the hard ones?' reaction. I'd rather not get that.
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    (Original post by Contrad!ction.)
    I suppose I should have made it clearer in my OP that I was looking for checking techniques.
    Read the question twice before you start to answer it.

    Substitute answers back in to equations to see if they work.

    (Not for Core 1 but ...) check all calculator work twice.

    Read your answers through at the end.
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      (Original post by Mr M)
      Read the question twice before you start to answer it.

      Substitute answers back in to equations to see if they work.

      (Not for Core 1 but ...) check all calculator work twice.

      Read your answers through at the end.
      With the calculator thing, what would happen if your calculator actually broke down during the exam?
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      (Original post by im so academic)
      With the calculator thing, what would happen if your calculator actually broke down during the exam?
      Have two calculators. (That's the actual advice we were given; not me trying to be funny).

      If you don't it's still possible to get good marks: you're only realistically looking at losing the final mark of a question for having the correct answer providing all your working is correct. Excuse the lack of finishing difficult calculations by saying your calculator broke; the examiner might be more sympathetic towards you (this is unlikely, but you never know). Make sure you do put down an answer so they you can get follow through marks for the next parts of the question though. If you have enough time you can work out the calculations by hand anyway.
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      (Original post by im so academic)
      With the calculator thing, what would happen if your calculator actually broke down during the exam?
      Take two? In my school, the invigilators have a few spares that they will lend to people who can show there one isn't working.
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      (Original post by Contrad!ction.)
      I know how to answer questions. I'm not bad at Maths. I'm aiming for an A*. (OCR maths core 1)

      But I lose marks easily just by making pathetically stupid mistakes that I don't pick up on when I check through. In my mock I dropped to 55/72. I should have only dropped 2 marks but due to mistakes like:
      - forgetting to multiply out one term
      - adding where there was a minus sign
      - differentiating 2x^3 + 2x^2 + 2 as 6x^2 + 4x + 2 (...huh?)
      - writing y-y1=m(x-x1) then putting y1 into x1 and x1 into y1
      - 6*6=32
      ...I ended up with a B. That was the Jun '10 paper; it really freaked me out. I get the formula, I get the application, I get the reasoning. But I also get the easy bits... wrong. And I don't notice when I read through. I'm supposed to be teaching revision sessions to some of my friends yet I can't even do the simple stuff.

      Does anybody have any tips to make sure I pick up on these mistakes before handing it in?
      Don't worry; this happens to alot of us and you can get an A* irrespective of what others tell you. Just learn to go throught the questions more slowly; pacing through doesn't help and even if you check them over you're likely to miss the mistake entirely - I have a feeling you have half the time leftover at the end from going so fast so just tone it down a bit and check through thoroughly!
     
     
     
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