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    I thought it might be a good idea to have a thread for History students in their first year, as I've noticed big differences between A Level,where I got by pretty easy, and Uni.

    Was wondering, how do poeple organise their time, process what they've learnt, revise, and select what to spend time on and how long?

    How many pages are people reading a week and I guess generally, how are people getting by and finding the experience, both relative to A Level and on its own?

    I personally really miss having 4ish hours a week of lessons from a teacher who directs what you learn alot more and takes a more intimate approach. I'm still adjusting to lectures, which I'm finding are really scant in content :s I'm having to compensate for all of this with heaps upon heaps of reading, and I'm struggling to keep myself engaged with it all because after a while, it just gets boring :/ I'm really, really not used ot reading so much, and alot of the content contradicts itself, which is annoying. Historiography is something that's bothering me alot too; my tutors keep telling me in essays I need to criticise the Historians more, but I find it difficult to do that when a) I know nothing about the period and am relying on historians to educate me impartially, and b) they're much more edcuated in their field and therefore it seems abit ambitious me, a student of a module for some 12 weeks, towaltz in and criticize them.

    I guess after doing so much since starting the holidays), I'm getting into the swing of reading so much and this historiogra[hy business, so I am optimistic after time and practice I'll adjust myself into the midset they want from me.

    Now your input
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    (Original post by AlligatorTears)
    Historiography is something that's bothering me alot too; my tutors keep telling me in essays I need to criticise the Historians more, but I find it difficult to do that when a) I know nothing about the period and am relying on historians to educate me impartially, and b) they're much more edcuated in their field and therefore it seems abit ambitious me, a student of a module for some 12 weeks, towaltz in and criticize them.
    I love this aspect of History. I'm not at uni but for Scottish Higher history you can get marks for Historiography. I found it hilarious that at age 16 we're expected to have the arrogance to read a historians opinion then turn around and say that their 20 years of experience in the field is a load of crap
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    (Original post by Delaney)
    I love this aspect of History. I'm not at uni but for Scottish Higher history you can get marks for Historiography. I found it hilarious that at age 16 we're expected to have the arrogance to read a historians opinion then turn around and say that their 20 years of experience in the field is a load of crap
    Well if you have evidence to suggest that what they're saying is to the contrary, then man up and say it. Otherwise you're not getting anywhere.
 
 
 
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