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    Hey all,

    I'll keep this nice and short. I quit uni a year and a half ago after doing 2 years. Won't go into reasons but had health issues and bereavements to deal with. I haven't told my student loans company I have quit still, I have no idea why I don't tell them. Anyways, I've been looking for a career or a job as a trainee since i've quit and finding it impossible seeing as employers want people with experience and or graduates and I am neither. So I have recently decided to go back to uni but I have a major cloud over my head in dealing with the student loans company and just want advice as I can't seem to find anything. Will I be in trouble with them or will they just ignore it and give me funding for next year? I heard somewhere you're allowed 5 years worth of loans, can anyone clarify that?

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    You should have told them you'd left, I dont understand though why you didnt? Have you continued to receive money even though you're not there? If so this could seriously jeopardise your ability to get more funding from them. You wont get a course fully funded in any case.
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    You won't get a penny until you've squared up what you owe.
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    And either way you're only allowed 1 f*** up year, and you've had 2, so you won't get the funding for the first year.
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    (Original post by tbm)
    You should have told them you'd left, I dont understand though why you didnt? Have you continued to receive money even though you're not there? If so this could seriously jeopardise your ability to get more funding from them. You wont get a course fully funded in any case.

    I think the reason why I didn't tell them is because of the fear of having to pay back some of rhe loan/grant straight away when I had at the time literally about 10 pounds to my name and no I haven't recieved anything since, think my uni has told them.

    I thought I may have to pay for the 1st year by myself which should be ok but will they fund the other 2 you reacon?
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      You don't have to tell them because your university informs them as well (unless you used the money while away from uni). The only problem would be that you will not get any funding for the first year. What course are you thinking of going to, if you have good grades in the first year you might go directly in the second year of another university, or at least don't need to take all the modules.
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      Have you not been getting letters and such from them? Surely they wouldn't just ignore the fact that you've left- and in any case, you'd be due to start paying something back if you've been left this long, wouldn't you?

      You wouldn't get funding for your whole course- two years at the most.
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      You need to pay back any of the grants/loans that you were overpaid for (which means, if you left in the middle of a term, else they'll take it out of any funding you DO get).

      You're only supposed to get funding for one course + one year, so that people who drop out after a year (like me) get the chance to start again. However, as you've already had two years funding, you might get two years of funding, but you might not get any at all, depending what they want.
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      (Original post by cybergrad)
      You don't have to tell them because your university informs them as well (unless you used the money while away from uni). The only problem would be that you will not get any funding for the first year. What course are you thinking of going to, if you have good grades in the first year you might go directly in the second year of another university, or at least don't need to take all the modules.
      Actually, Schedule 3 of The Education (Student Support) Regulations 2009 states it's the student's responsibility to inform the SLC they are no longer in attendance.

      http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2...chedule/3/made

      The student also signs a declaration stating that they will inform the SLC if they leave their course. Failign to do so is, in effect, a breach of contract and would make the full sum repayable right away.
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        (Original post by Taiko)
        Actually, Schedule 3 of The Education (Student Support) Regulations 2009 states it's the student's responsibility to inform the SLC they are no longer in attendance.

        http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2...chedule/3/made

        The student also signs a declaration stating that they will inform the SLC if they leave their course. Failign to do so is, in effect, a breach of contract and would make the full sum repayable right away.
        You are correct but if he hasn't been given any money while withdrawn from university it doesn't matter because it doesn't make any difference. That's why I asked him if he used any money while he shouldn't. If it did he will have to give them back immediately but I know people in a similar situation, they started paying back at a rate of £10 per month due to financial difficulties.
       
       
       
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