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    Hi all,

    I'm a 2011 applicant and just curious about failing modules (not that I'm contemplating doing so). People at school fail bits of the year all the time - be it coursework or an exam, nearly always you get the option to retake so no one really cares since most of the time you can still get an A after failing something. As I understand it at uni its different, you can't retake things nearly as easily and failing a module seems to be much more of a big deal than it does at school.

    So how does it work? Is it just much harder to actually fail something at uni, or do people tend to work a lot harder to avoid failing anything?
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    Personally I think the exams are easier. Some of the exam are multiple choise and other are not set under exam condition like A levels ang GCSE. Heck in one of my exams, we were allowed to do it at home The exams are marked by the university themselves; they are not sent of to an external exam board.

    As for failing a unit, you have the option to redo it but the maximum you can get is 40% (or so I believe)
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      (Original post by mrdoovde1)
      Personally I think the exams are easier. Some of the exam are multiple choise and other are not set under exam condition like A levels ang GCSE. Heck in one of my exams, we were allowed to do it at home The exams are marked by the university themselves; they are not sent of to an external exam board.

      As for failing a unit, you have the option to redo it but the maximum you can get is 40% (or so I believe)
      Am afraid you are wrong about the external exam board. Every university has external examiners (from other universities of equal reputation) and also they have to give the OK with the difficulty of the exam questions.


      About failing a unit, this depends on the university and the department. For example at University of York in your resits you had to pass with a mark of 40% but you would only get your original mark (the one from the May/June exams) on your transcript.
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      It is true that there are both internal and external moderation procedures at University, even though the exam paper itself is written by the module convener. As has already been said, reassessments at University are usually capped at the level of a bare pass (40%), unless there are documented Mitigating Circumstances. If this is the case, then you may be entitled to a fresh attempt during the next exam session - or take the paper as a defered assessment. There is usually a separate exam period at the end of the academic year for this purpose. As for failing a module, you will usually be either required to retake it (or another one with the same credit value) in the following year or transfer to the ordinary degree. This depends on the number of modules that you fail.
     
     
     
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