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Why are students allowed to vote? Watch

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    There is not one other social group in this country that is anywhere near as self-centrered and selfish as students.

    When I was at college and Uni the sole reason for people voting for the Lib Dems was because of their tuition fees promise yet they couldn't tell you a single thing about any of their other policies.

    There's absolutely no doubt the age at which people are allowed to vote needs to be raised. The amount of stupidity exuded from students in the recent marches proves they are not mature enough to make the sort of decisions that affect the rest of us.

    Rather than calling me a troll, ask yourselves how many 18 year olds you've met that can hold a coherent and sensible conversation about politics. I doubt it's many.
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    (Original post by EsStupido)
    Rather than calling me a troll, ask yourselves how many 18 year olds you've met that can hold a coherent and sensible conversation about politics. I doubt it's many.
    Are you 18? If so, chalk that up as a -1 to the '18 year olds that can hold a coherent and sensible conversation about politics' figure.
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    Good point, but many people vote entirely in self-interest.

    But when it's election time and you see people being interviewed on television, it's pretty clear that they don't have a clue about any of the mainstream parties' policies - you shouldn't single out students.
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    (Original post by DarkSenrine)
    Good point, but many people vote entirely in self-interest.
    But if, for example, you're a 30 year old hard-working individual who owns or rents a property then it's become your right to vote as you wish, surely?

    Whereas when you're a student doing a subsidised degree that requires 10 hours a week of your life, why do you have the right to be selfish?
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    Well almost everything you said in your post wasn't true, or at least, it may be true in some cases but not in many others.
    For one thing, the vast majority of students on the marches were peaceful. Each time, it was a minority of extremists, many of whom were not even students, who caused the violence, which was partly down to the police brutality.
    For another, not all students vote Lib Dem. I didn't, many of my friends didn't, many people on TSR didn't. A lot did, but not all. There were also other policies which people liked apart from the tuition fees (almost all of which have now been dropped since Clegg sold out) such as Trident.
    There are many other groups who are more selfish - bankers or owners of large businesses who vote Conservative because they want to escape higher taxes are just as (if not more so) selfish than students voting Lib Dem on account of tuition fees.
    Many 18 year olds can hold a decent conversation about politics - I've been slated before on TSR for using the 'some of my friends' argument, but I think it's valid here. I know several 18 year olds who are passionate about politics and who can hold a more knowledgeable and informed conversation than the average adult.

    In addition, the age at which one becomes an adult in the UK is 18. Voting is a right available to adults. Why should we exclude people who should be treated equally under the law on the basis that they are a student? Or under 21? This would be a shocking regression rather than progress.
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    I'm 17 and feel i have a fairly good grasp of politics! As has been said most people vote in their own interests, also its a bit discriminatory to say all, or even the majority, of students are selfish and can therefore not vote because they are students.

    Maybe you should ban all people who strike from voting. Need i mention the recent BA strikes or the tube strikes yesterday, the amount of 'stupidity exuded' from these people is overwhelming.
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    (Original post by EsStupido)
    There is not one other social group in this country that is anywhere near as self-centrered and selfish as students.

    When I was at college and Uni the sole reason for people voting for the Lib Dems was because of their tuition fees promise yet they couldn't tell you a single thing about any of their other policies.

    There's absolutely no doubt the age at which people are allowed to vote needs to be raised. The amount of stupidity exuded from students in the recent marches proves they are not mature enough to make the sort of decisions that affect the rest of us.

    Rather than calling me a troll, ask yourselves how many 18 year olds you've met that can hold a coherent and sensible conversation about politics. I doubt it's many.



    By that logic we shouldn't let the working class vote. :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by d123)
    For one thing, the vast majority of students on the marches were peaceful. Each time, it was a minority of extremists, many of whom were not even students, who caused the violence, which was partly down to the police brutality.
    Complete and utter rubbish.

    For another, not all students vote Lib Dem. I didn't, many of my friends didn't, many people on TSR didn't. A lot did, but not all.
    The main reason for voting for the Lib Dems was the tuition fee's promise. That's a fact.

    Many 18 year olds can hold a decent conversation about politics - I've been slated before on TSR for using the 'some of my friends' argument, but I think it's valid here. I know several 18 year olds who are passionate about politics and who can hold a more knowledgeable and informed conversation than the average adult.
    There are always exceptions. That doesn't mean for the most part that it's not the case.

    In addition, the age at which one becomes an adult in the UK is 18. Voting is a right available to adults. Why should we exclude people who should be treated equally under the law on the basis that they are a student? Or under 21? This would be a shocking regression rather than progress.
    Perhaps the age barrier should be raised?
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    theres plenty of people over 18 that couldn't hold a coherent and sensible conversation about politics. are you saying we should stop them voting too?
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    (Original post by didgeridoo12uk)
    theres plenty of people over 18 that couldn't hold a coherent and sensible conversation about politics. are you saying we should stop them voting too?
    Are they enjoy a subsidised education whilst giving absolutely zero back in return? If so, perhaps we should.
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    That may genuinely be one of the most poorly reasoned points I've ever seen anyone make.

    Fwiw, I know more 18 year olds who can hold a coherent and sensible conversation about politics than I do people of above that age.
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    (Original post by EsStupido)
    Complete and utter rubbish.
    No it's not. Don't read everything you believe in the Daily Mail! Actually pay attention to what the people who went on the march have been saying, which overwhelmingly proves what I said. It's not rubbish at all.

    (Original post by EsStupido)
    The main reason for voting for the Lib Dems was the tuition fee's promise. That's a fact.
    I'm not denying it wasn't a major factor, but it's not even a bad thing. Each party has a particular angle and each voter looks for something to benefit them in the manifestos. It's hardly the fault of the student for not wanting to be saddled with debt for something that should be free as a matter of principle!


    (Original post by EsStupido)
    There are always exceptions. That doesn't mean for the most part that it's not the case.
    That's true, but you claimed in your OP that very few students know anything about politics, I'm simply disputing that.

    (Original post by EsStupido)
    Perhaps the age barrier should be raised?
    It shouldn't. As I said before, that would be regression, not progress. Raising the voting age wouldn't achieve anything, it would be a sad day for democracy and further embed into society the ridiculous and untrue stereotypes about students.
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    (Original post by EsStupido)
    When I was at college and Uni the sole reason for people voting for the Lib Dems was because of their tuition fees promise yet they couldn't tell you a single thing about any of their other policies.
    Yes, shame on them for being less aware of the party they vote for's policies than the average person.

    Oh wait...

    :rolleyes:

    :facepalm2:

    Nice to see there are still reactionary nutjobs who think that voting should be restricted to them and people like them who enjoy writing letters in green ink to the daily fail.
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    (Original post by SamF1992)
    That may genuinely be one of the most poorly reasoned points I've ever seen anyone make.

    Fwiw, I know more 18 year olds who can hold a coherent and sensible conversation about politics than I do people of above that age.

    You don't actually know anyone above the age of 18 do you?
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    (Original post by EsStupido)
    Are they enjoy a subsidised education whilst giving absolutely zero back in return? If so, perhaps we should.
    Firstly, students don't give 'zero back in return'.
    Secondly, a free or subsidised education is a good thing, and shouldn't make a difference to whether someone is entitled to vote! Education enables us to broaden our minds, to become better people and to enhance our lives. There are the economic and employment benefits as well, but on a purely intellectual level, education is one of the most valuable services that can be provided, along with healthcare.
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    (Original post by d123)
    No it's not. Don't read everything you believe in the Daily Mail! Actually pay attention to what the people who went on the march have been saying, which overwhelmingly proves what I said. It's not rubbish at all.
    Ah yes, because they wouldn't possibly lie would they?


    I'm not denying it wasn't a major factor, but it's not even a bad thing. Each party has a particular angle and each voter looks for something to benefit them in the manifestos. It's hardly the fault of the student for not wanting to be saddled with debt for something that should be free as a matter of principle!
    The last part of your sentence is complete rubbish imo, but that's by the by.

    If you think voting and therefore in turn trying to elect a party simply because you agree with one of their manifesto's is a good thing I'm worried for you.
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    None of the reasons you state for taking away the right to vote from students are exclusive to them. The average voter isn't any better as far as political awareness is concerned.
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    Yes, I do. It could just be, maybe, just maybe, that the people that I encounter are different to the type of people you encounter. Fortunately I don't try and extrapolate my experiences to create stereotypes about these groups and then use those stereotypes to form opinions.
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    (Original post by EsStupido)
    But if, for example, you're a 30 year old hard-working individual who owns or rents a property then it's become your right to vote as you wish, surely?

    Whereas when you're a student doing a subsidised degree that requires 10 hours a week of your life, why do you have the right to be selfish?
    What about the unemployed and disabled eh. I don't think they deserve a vote, they just leech off society and only care for themselves while the hard working man pays.
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    (Original post by EsStupido)
    Ah yes, because they wouldn't possibly lie would they?
    Well, seeing as it was a number of my trusted friends who told me, and also my mum, who didn't attend the protests but who witnessed some of what happened, then I trust them. Also I don't have a pointless grudge against my fellow students.

    (Original post by EsStupido)


    The last part of your sentence is complete rubbish imo, but that's by the by.

    If you think voting and therefore in turn trying to elect a party simply because you agree with one of their manifesto's is a good thing I'm worried for you.
    I'm not saying it's the best reason for voting, but it's far better than voting because your friend or parent told you to vote for a certain party, or not voting at all, or voting because you like or don't like a certain politician. Better to vote for a policy than because you think Gordon Brown is ugly, which happens - and not just with students. Also, in my experience, the people who voted Lib Dem weren't just voting for the tuition fees; it may have been their main reason, but they weren't completely unaware of the other policies.

    But yes, surely it's better to vote in agreement with one policy than to vote for other reasons that are unrelated to policy?
 
 
 
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