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    Can you help me with the answer for this? Please

    Fe2O3 + CO -> Fe + CO2

    (the fe2 and O3 are meant to be subscript)
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    i *am* so glad i never took chemistry a level.
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    (Original post by SAGNA)
    Can you help me with the answer for this? Please

    Fe2O3 + CO -> Fe + CO

    (the fe2 and O3 are meant to be subscript)
    You have not copied it out correctly...

    On the RHS it should be CO2 not CO
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    (Original post by charco)
    You have not copied it out correctly...

    On the RHS it should be CO2 not CO
    Yeah, sorry thanks do you know how to do it?
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    The balanced equation is below:
    Fe2O3 + 3CO -> 2Fe + 3CO2

    Your equation is correct because CO should be at the left hand side as it is acting as a reducing agent.
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    (Original post by SAGNA)
    Can you help me with the answer for this? Please

    Fe2O3 + CO -> Fe + CO2

    (the fe2 and O3 are meant to be subscript)


    Right so we start with:

     Fe_2O_3 + CO \rightarrow Fe + CO_2

    So on the left there are 2 iron atoms, but only 1 on the right, so we need to fix that, making:

     Fe_2O_3 + CO \rightarrow 2Fe + CO_2

    Now we need to balance the oxygens. We already have 3 on the left, and 2 on the right, so were going to have to change the amount on the right up to 3CO2. So now there are six oxygens on the right and only 4 on the left, to fix this we need to change the single carbon monoxide into 3 moles of it.

     Fe_2O_3 + 3CO \rightarrow 2Fe + 3CO_2

    That has also balance the carbons for the equation, so it is now completely balanced.
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    (Original post by ThisIsOurDecision)
    Right so we start with:

     Fe_2O_3 + CO \rightarrow Fe + CO_2

    So on the left there are 2 iron atoms, but only 1 on the right, so we need to fix that, making:

     Fe_2O_3 + CO \rightarrow 2Fe + CO_2

    Now we need to balance the oxygens. We already have 3 on the left, and 2 on the right, so were going to have to change the amount on the right up to 3CO2. So now there are six oxygens on the right and only 4 on the left, to fix this we need to change the single carbon monoxide into 3 moles of it.

     Fe_2O_3 + 3CO \rightarrow 2Fe + 3CO_2

    That has also balance the carbons for the equation, so it is now completely balanced.
    Thanks for the help!
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    (Original post by lubus)
    i *am* so glad i never took chemistry a level.
    That looks like GCSE to me..... extraction of iron from iron oxide in a blast furnace.

    for some practice balancing equations, try out
    http://education.jlab.org/elementbalancing/index.html
    or
    http://www.daveingram.ca/chemistry/equation1.html

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    (Original post by gingerbreadman85)
    That looks like GCSE to me..... extraction of iron from iron oxide in a blast furnace.

    for some practice balancing equations, try out
    http://education.jlab.org/elementbalancing/index.html
    or
    http://www.daveingram.ca/chemistry/equation1.html

    Funny, i got an A* in IGCSE Chemistry ... goes to show some of the pitfalls of the modern education system
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    It usually gets taught about year 9 or year 10 in our school. Cue endless balancing equation worksheets. I dont know much about the IGCSE, i thought it was supposed to be harder than the rest?
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      (Original post by SAGNA)
      Can you help me with the answer for this? Please

      Fe2O3 + CO -> Fe + CO2

      (the fe2 and O3 are meant to be subscript)
      I did it as...

      2Fe2O3 + 6CO -> 4Fe + 6CO2

      Always leave single elements until last.

      If I can't figure it out I usually pick a number between 2-6 and place it in front of a compound then work from there. It usually gives me some inspiration.
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      (Original post by Genocidal)
      I did it as...

      2Fe2O3 + 6CO -> 4Fe + 6CO2

      Always leave single elements until last.

      If I can't figure it out I usually pick a number between 2-6 and place it in front of a compound then work from there. It usually gives me some inspiration.
      Divide through by 2 ...
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        (Original post by charco)
        Divide through by 2 ...
        Yes I could but exam answers accept different multiples. At least my exam board does so meh.
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        Bad practice though moving into A-level. Also makes calculations with moles unnecessarily complicated!
       
       
       
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