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    Are there any current medicine students who would be able to help me by answering a few short questions about the increased tuition fees?
    I am a journalism student writing a feature about the increased tuition fees and how they will affect medicine in the future.
    Your time would be a great help
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    (Original post by Jo-90)
    Are there any current medicine students who would be able to help me by answering a few short questions about the increased tuition fees?
    I am a journalism student writing a feature about the increased tuition fees and how they will affect medicine in the future.
    Your time would be a great help
    Why don't you just put the questions in a post and see who responds? People can always PM you their answers if they don't want to post them here.
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    what are the questions?
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    (Original post by Jo-90)
    Are there any current medicine students who would be able to help me by answering a few short questions about the increased tuition fees?
    I am a journalism student writing a feature about the increased tuition fees and how they will affect medicine in the future.
    Your time would be a great help
    No effect. The almost guaranteed high salary with the limit of £9,000 on fees a year will not result in people being turned off medicine at all. IMO of course.
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    Well the questions are basically just looking at what effect the raised tuition fees will have on medicine:

    1. With medical students facing £70,000 debt at the end of their 5 years, do you think this will affect who applies to do a medical degree?
    (i.e. will those from poorer backgrounds (despite their grades and potential) still apply to study medicine?)

    2. Due to the large debt that these medical students will face, how do you think the NHS will be affected in later years? Will they be able to afford these new doctors? (will the NHS in the long run be affected?)

    3. For current medical student- Would you have gone into medicine still if you had faced £70,000 debt?

    What I ultimately need is quotes from medical students and those hoping to do medicine to put in my feature as it is something that is affecting them. Its not going to be published but your answers will be a massive help
    Thankyou guys
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    (Original post by Jo-90)
    Well the questions are basically just looking at what effect the raised tuition fees will have on medicine:

    1. With medical students facing £70,000 debt at the end of their 5 years, do you think this will affect who applies to do a medical degree?
    (i.e. will those from poorer backgrounds (despite their grades and potential) still apply to study medicine?)

    2. Due to the large debt that these medical students will face, how do you think the NHS will be affected in later years? Will they be able to afford these new doctors? (will the NHS in the long run be affected?)

    3. For current medical student- Would you have gone into medicine still if you had faced £70,000 debt?

    What I ultimately need is quotes from medical students and those hoping to do medicine to put in my feature as it is something that is affecting them. Its not going to be published but your answers will be a massive help
    Thankyou guys

    1. No, you pay nothing up front and if you really have passion for the job then you will be able to pay back those fees with a doctor's salary,

    2. The NHS will not be effected, maybe with the exception that the government will have greater flexibility to increase its funding with a reduced University bill.

    3. Yes. The salary will be good enough to pay this off over 20 years.
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    (Original post by Jo-90)
    1. With medical students facing £70,000 debt at the end of their 5 years, do you think this will affect who applies to do a medical degree?
    (i.e. will those from poorer backgrounds (despite their grades and potential) still apply to study medicine?)
    Who knows? Potential doctors from poorer backgrounds are already put off for a variety of reasons and remain under represented in medical schools and in the profession. Although the first two years are free or discounted (I'm told, I don't keep track of this ****) for the poorest students, I cannot see this making a 'positive' impact.


    2. Due to the large debt that these medical students will face, how do you think the NHS will be affected in later years? Will they be able to afford these new doctors? (will the NHS in the long run be affected?)
    The NHS will pay the same (or less as it currently works out), neither wages nor bursaries will be going up. Infact, wages will continue to drop as hospitals find ways to wriggle out of banding payments and the DDRB continue to recommend below inflation pay rises.


    3. For current medical student- Would you have gone into medicine still if you had faced £70,000 debt?
    Probably. But it's not that straightforward.
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    (Original post by Jo-90)
    1. With medical students facing £70,000 debt at the end of their 5 years, do you think this will affect who applies to do a medical degree?
    (i.e. will those from poorer backgrounds (despite their grades and potential) still apply to study medicine?)
    I'm not sure about school leavers, but I think it will certainly make those applying as graduates think twice. Even though people talk about not paying it until you earn a certain amount, to even know that you will have that amount of debt can be very off putting.
    (Original post by Jo-90)
    2. Due to the large debt that these medical students will face, how do you think the NHS will be affected in later years? Will they be able to afford these new doctors? (will the NHS in the long run be affected?)
    Considering the amount of competition there already is, I doubt there will be a problem with recruiting enough people to study medicine -but the representation of classes will probably get even more skewed.
    (Original post by Jo-90)
    3. For current medical student- Would you have gone into medicine still if you had faced £70,000 debt?
    I don't think I would have done it the way I did (doing a GEM course), but seeming as I doubt it'd be any cheaper to study anywhere else, you'd just have to stomach it.
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    (Original post by Jo-90)
    Are there any current medicine students who would be able to help me by answering a few short questions about the increased tuition fees?
    I am a journalism student writing a feature about the increased tuition fees and how they will affect medicine in the future.
    Your time would be a great help
    Please see the forum title: "Not the place...to ask current medical students questions!"
 
 
 
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