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What should I do at university to become a PA? Watch

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    I'm not sure this is the right place to post this. I have been considering it more and more as career, and I think it would be a great job for me, as I have good people skills and I am very organised. My parents say the best way to get into it is to study a language at university, and then do a post graduate which will give me the skills to be a PA. I will be applying to uni in UCAS cycle 2012. Opinions and advice would be greatly appreciated, including appropriate work experience I should be doing. I currently do a bit of secretarial work for a local GP, and have done work experience in a finance department for a pharmaceutical company.
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    I guess if you want to go to university, a language would be a good idea, or something like English or History, so you have good writing skills. But I wouldn't do post grad. To be a PA, you need experience more than anything. Maybe a short course in IT skills, so you know all of MS Office really well. Maybe a shorthand course. But it's probably best to get a job as a receptionist or office assistant and work your way up to being a PA - uni isn't that necessary.
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    (Original post by Zebrastripes)
    I guess if you want to go to university, a language would be a good idea, or something like English or History, so you have good writing skills. But I wouldn't do post grad. To be a PA, you need experience more than anything. Maybe a short course in IT skills, so you know all of MS Office really well. Maybe a shorthand course. But it's probably best to get a job as a receptionist or office assistant and work your way up to being a PA - uni isn't that necessary.
    Thank you. My parents are strong believers that you should get a degree even if you don't want a career based on your degree, just as a back up, and for the sake of bettering my knowledge, I guess.
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    (Original post by Alt__x)
    Thank you. My parents are strong believers that you should get a degree even if you don't want a career based on your degree, just as a back up, and for the sake of bettering my knowledge, I guess.
    Going to university for the sole reason of pleasing your parents. Great idea. Nothing like handing over thousands and thousands of pounds and years of your life for that.

    /sarcasm.
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    I think doing a language is a smart move. It's a generalist degree which offers a lot of exit opportunities if you decide that becoming a PA isn't actually for you.
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    (Original post by Chemist548)
    Going to university for the sole reason of pleasing your parents. Great idea. Nothing like handing over thousands and thousands of pounds and years of your life for that.

    /sarcasm.
    The joys of living in Scotland. I might have to spend a few thousand on accomidation etc, but it is £9000 less than what I'd be spending if I lived in England
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    (Original post by Alt__x)
    The joys of living in Scotland. I might have to spend a few thousand on accomidation etc, but it is £9000 less than what I'd be spending if I lived in England
    Actually, assuming you had worked for minimum wage for 4 years, you'd be down around £50,000.
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    You dont really need a degree for a career as a PA and definately dont need a postgraduate qualification - there are lots of these opportunities around, for most of which you just need previous admin/secretarial experience. However if you want a degree then languages sound like a good idea as it opens the opportunity to work in other countries. Business might be a good one too.

    If this is something you feel strongly about doing then I suggest you just start looking for PA jobs and applying. Someone I know started off doing temping for the NHS, then she was promoted to PA/secretary, then office manager, and now 8 years on she is a manager for the NHS earning a fortune, with no qualifications except for A Levels, although I think they did pay for her to do a degree or something like that part time.

    But if youre not 100% sure that this is for you, then yes uni would be a good idea.
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    LOL your parents obviously have no idea. A postgrad to be a PA hahahahaha. It's called leaving school at 16 or 18 and working your way up The minute you do a degree, you'll be far too over qualified and unexperienced
 
 
 
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