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    For first years, it is compulsory and the resources are now already on moodle.

    I don't know about you guys, but it sounds really tedious and micky mouse to me. All those phrases like "critical thinking" "communication skills" "information skills" etc have a serious wiff of general studies about them if you ask me. I hope it's not the case, but I can imagine going to one class and realising how lame it is then having zero enthusiasm for it for the rest of the year.
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    2 hour lecture at 9am on Tuesday. Beautiful :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Tallon)
    For first years, it is compulsory and the resources are now already on moodle.

    I don't know about you guys, but it sounds really tedious and micky mouse to me. All those phrases like "critical thinking" "communication skills" "information skills" etc have a serious wiff of general studies about them if you ask me. I hope it's not the case, but I can imagine going to one class and realising how lame it is then having zero enthusiasm for it for the rest of the year.
    I don't go to LSE but I'm curious, what exactly does it entail as you've not been overly specific and obviously, I don't have access to moodle.

    Personally I think most subjects at most universities should include a critical thinking module in the first year to go through basic fallacies, formalised logic, venn diagrams and truth tables.
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    Although it seems like a lot of people tend to fall asleep in LSE100, I think most of my friends in 2nd year enjoyed it, but not so much the amount of reading you have to do! They advertise those bull**** skills to make you more appealing to employers (who have HR who look for those skills), it isn't a doss course though. I chose not to do it and a lot of my friends dropped out...
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    (Original post by there's too much love)
    I don't go to LSE but I'm curious, what exactly does it entail as you've not been overly specific and obviously, I don't have access to moodle.

    Personally I think most subjects at most universities should include a critical thinking module in the first year to go through basic fallacies, formalised logic, venn diagrams and truth tables.
    I havn't done it yet so you might be better off asking Sway or some 2nd year who's actually took it. From what I can tell though it's all about confronting big issues in the news in a very pathetic generial studies-ish sort of way. More essay writing than truth tables and venn diagrams I think.
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    (Original post by there's too much love)
    Personally I think most subjects at most universities should include a critical thinking module in the first year to go through basic fallacies, formalised logic, venn diagrams and truth tables.
    You learn about the bigger issues of life outside of your department: e.g. justice/torture/etc, environmental issues, financial crisis, etc. As well as statistical techniques, how to write reports, how to present, etc (you won't learn all these skills in each course at LSE, e.g. I've never had to do a presentation and I'm sure many courses have no statistics in them). The classes for the course are mixed with every department - typically, law students only have classes with law students, but this way they can meet mathematicians/geographists/etc.

    It is also lectured by some of the biggest names at LSE, who typically you'll never meet as an undergrad, e.g. Sir Nicholas Stern who wrote the extremely influential Stern report on climate change, Sir Howard Davies who's Director at LSE and famous for many reasons, Prof. Danny Quah who's one of the stars in the Economics department, etc.

    In principle, it's a good course.
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    The first lecture was horrific.
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    I am not surprised at all that (many) LSE students would find this course stupid.
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    (Original post by Krebs)
    The first lecture was horrific.
    Second that.
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    (Original post by danny111)
    I am not surprised at all that (many) LSE students would find this course stupid.
    This is a serious question.

    If I went to no classes or lectures and got an obviously terrible mark in the exam, would there be consequences in the future for me?
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    (Original post by Tallon)
    This is a serious question.

    If I went to no classes or lectures and got an obviously terrible mark in the exam, would there be consequences in the future for me?
    Is this for LSE100? If so I have no idea, never took it.
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    (Original post by Tallon)
    This is a serious question.

    If I went to no classes or lectures and got an obviously terrible mark in the exam, would there be consequences in the future for me?
    Yes - miss 3 classes in a row and you'll get an e-mail threatning that you'll be kicked out of LSE (just got one myself a couple of days ago :eek: )!

    In addition, it could be considered unethical (not the word I'm looking for, but can't think of the right one) by your employers if you don't declare it on your CV/their application forms, which they could use as a reason to reject you because it's dishonesty (where as they probably wouldn't care less about a poor mark).
 
 
 
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