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    I remember a few weeks back now I was on the bus to school when sat behind me were some Y9's (or whatever year they were in). One of them was talking to the rest about medicine and basically how its quite a lucrative career.

    Anyway this got me thinking. Do most medics outgrow this attitude and develop a genuine passion for healing the sick. Or do most disguise this attitude and make up a story to impress admissions staff?

    In short my question is: How many medics do you think are actually in it for good reasons, and how many do you think are just in it for the money and prestige?

    Alright quick comment to make here. I am in no way wanting to apply for medicine. For a start as you can plainly see I am a chemist not a medic. The only reason I asked this as I was curious if it's common place to find people becoming doctors mostly for the money.
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    no. if u want money, go into banking.
    but medics are most normal people on campus.
    u can date them.
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    I won't lie, when I applied (years ago ) part of my motivation was having a career where I could be financially independent and always have a job. I guess it's not the same as wanting the big bucks - but I think most people who want money go into professions where they earn more doing less.

    Some people grow out of it, I know I stopped obsessing about money before I graduated. I remember having a chat with a guy on my course who hand-on-heart believes anything less than 100K is a rubbish salary, but most medics I knew just wanted to enjoy their careers and be 'good enough' doctors.

    Then again, I don't believe that most souls in medical school are in it 100% for healing the sick etc. it doesn't make them bad people, so long as you're not looking to abuse prescription drugs or kill others, I don't think there should be a hierarchy of reasons, where one is 'better' than the other.
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    I wouldn't want to be a doctor for less than a comfortable middle-class salary, but I don't think you could actually want to do the long hours and the masses of extra training and constant learning required without another motivation. For most people, including me, the biggest motivation is helping people, although this is helped by a large interest in how the body works and illness in my own mind. In the end I don't think I've ever met a medic who truly is only in it for the money.
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    Medicine isn't all that lucrative. You start on circa 20k a year and with bonuses you can get upto £30k. The top consultants earn somewhere in the regions of £90k after tax, but these days it's hard enough finding training posts let alone consultant positions.
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    (Original post by Mr Inquisitive)
    Yes, Medicine certainly is lucrative. But, it takes a lot of intellect and dedication to take up as a career.

    i.e. around 7 A*'s at GCSE, and then AAA/A*AA at A-Level.

    Not impossible, but not easy.
    1) No, it's not lucrative. Just because GPs have got a good deal at the moment doesn't mean all doctors are rolling in money. The average base salary is ~21k for a FY1 doctor.
    2) It doesn't take 'a lot' of intellect.
    3) I have 1 A* at GCSE. Or am I not really here? To put an average on it when Soton want 7 Bs and Birmingham 8 A*s is silly.
    4) There are med schools with AAB requirements. And foundation courses with as low as BCC.

    (Original post by Hippysnake)
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    I have a new name for you!
    ...Snappyhike. (Geddit? Geddit???)
    I is clever?
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    (Original post by felt_monkey)
    2) It doesn't take 'a lot' of intellect.
    That makes me feel better.
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    why should doctors be in it for good reasons?
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    When I was picking what degree I wanted to do, a doctor (amongst other professionals) came into my sixth form to talk to us. He said if you were in it for the money, go for dentistry.
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      I do believe there are certain people who apply for Medicine for the money/prestige.

      I mean, why aren't nursing, medical research, clinical scientists etc viable careers? Why specifically a doctor?

      Keep hearing about "help the sick, science in practice, contribute to society" and all that.

      So these careers, don't then?

      I.e. there are other amazing careers that can rival Medicine/doctor yet still allow you to work with patients etc.
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      They're going to have a ****ing surprise when they graduate and go into FY1.
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      (Original post by im so academic)
      I do believe there are certain people who apply for Medicine for the money/prestige.

      I mean, why aren't nursing, medical research, clinical scientists etc viable careers? Why specifically a doctor?


      Keep hearing about "help the sick, science in practice, contribute to society" and all that.

      So these careers, don't then?

      I.e. there are other amazing careers that can rival Medicine/doctor yet still allow you to work with patients etc.
      Oh, I don't know, maybe because they're all completely different to being a doctor? Just throwing it out there.
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      (Original post by felt_monkey)
      I have a new name for you!
      ...Snappyhike. (Geddit? Geddit???)
      I is clever?
      I don't get it. Now back to the kitchen and MAKE ME A SAMMICH.
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      (Original post by Hippysnake)
      I don't get it. Now back to the kitchen and MAKE ME A SAMMICH.
      One day I will earn your approval. One day.
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      I always thought medical students were alright... dental on the other hand, you talk to them and you can virtually see the numbers ringing up in their eyes like on an old fashioned cash till :eek:
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      To me, a stable career pathway and the fact that is more than likely always going to be a job somewhere for me as a doctor was definitely part of my reason. A high salary is a plus, but it's really not that lucrative. It takes years to get to a high salary, you really do have to work for your money, and when you get to the top jobs it's not that high compared to the salary of top jobs in other areas. If all you care about is money, don't do medicine. There are easier ways to get more money.
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        (Original post by RollerBall)
        Oh, I don't know, maybe because they're all completely different to being a doctor? Just throwing it out there.
        However, I know many wannabe medics that specify their reasons for being a doctor, yet can be applied to other careers as well. :confused:
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        (Original post by RollerBall)
        They're going to have a ****ing surprise when they graduate and go into FY1.
        What? Did they drop the salary of an FY1 from £97k or something?
        (Genuine question posed to me not too long ago.)
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        I don' think you should comment unless you know the actual requirements, although academics are important you can't generalise a set row of grades for medicine, ie 7A* is not needed you can get away with 6 Bs at Barts and the London and various other medical schools. On the other side you are generally right on A levels but still is ranges from AAB/A*AA.

        Medicine can be quite personal statement based, and that is what their interviews involve, because their is more to being a Doctor then grades. Maybe some people can luckily bluff their way through an interview and are really in the job for money, but i think people's attitudes tend to change when they have to show care and commitment to their patients as well as being able to use scientific knowledge to diagnose a patient.

        When Doctors first start as juniors they tend to get worked like Dogs, strange hours and on a crap salary, the senior Doctors make juniors work hard, and they start on like 21k as felt_monkey stated.

        The point is you need to have passion to be a Doctor and i think many people's attitudes change when they have to work countless hours for their 'prestige' and 'good' salary.
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        (Original post by im so academic)
        I do believe there are certain people who apply for Medicine for the money/prestige.

        I mean, why aren't nursing, medical research, clinical scientists etc viable careers? Why specifically a doctor?

        Keep hearing about "help the sick, science in practice, contribute to society" and all that.

        So these careers, don't then?

        I.e. there are other amazing careers that can rival Medicine/doctor yet still allow you to work with patients etc.
        For a lot of medical research posts, you need a medical degree. That and clinical scientists don't have the level of every day patient contact that a doctor has.

        Nursing -- not enough science. *just removing a bit as it would undoubtably piss the nurses off* Basically working as a HCA has shown me that being a nurse is not what I want to do.

        For me medicine has everything I want from a career. If all I cared about was academics, or helping people, or money, I would do something different. It's not a single aspect that makes me want to do it, it's the combination.
        -- science
        -- academically challenging and interesting
        -- caring
        -- every day contact with people
        -- rewarding
        -- stable career pathway
        -- decent salary, able to have a good quality of life
        -- respectable career
       
       
       
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