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    I want to know which one is better regarded by universities (top 5 or 10 for law)

    Please state the evidence you are making your judgement on as well.

    Thanks
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    (Original post by Lawlet)
    I want to know which one is better regarded by universities (top 5 or 10 for law)

    Please state the evidence you are making your judgement on as well.

    Thanks
    A Level, just because it is the traditional qualification in the UK. University admission tutors are used to A Levels, and those A*s look goooood.
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    It is harder to get an IB score of say, 39/45 than to get an A-Level with A*AA, depending of course, on subjects taken and one's ability in those subjects.

    Now you might ask why it is harder...there you go. With the IB, you have to study six subjects over the same amount of time that you would have studied four (or perhaps five) for A-Levels. Generally, three of these IB subjects are at Higher Level, which are deemed as equivalents for A2s and the other three are equivalents for AS subjects. Besides actual exams, for all subjects, you are required to submit Internal Assessments - for the Experimental Sciences, like Physics for instance, these would be practical experiments. In addition to this, you have a "mini dissertation" to write, called the Extended Essay, which can be written on any topic of your choice, provided the content falls within an IB subject and there is also the Theory of Knowledge essay. (more commonly known as 'Tons of Krap' but yeah...)

    Ah yes, there's also the CAS component of the IB Diploma which requires you to have a total of 150 hours of Creativity, Action and Service related activities over the course of your diploma.

    If you are set on a particular career course, like Engineering for example, it's best you do A-Levels, where you can study Mathematics, Further Mathematics, Chemistry and Physics. Unlike the IB, where you will have to replace one of those subjects with a social science. (you will also have two language subjects to study)

    At the end of the day, it all depends on what kind of experience you want from your last two years of school, what you would like to be learning about, in what manner you would like your learning process to occur, among other things. If you would like to study very specific subjects, stick with A-Levels. If, on the other hand, you would like more breadth (for lack of a better term), the IB is what you want to do.

    I might be wrong on some aspects here but hey, I did start my A-Levels and then switched on to an IB course, nine months or so into the year, so I should have a fairly good idea of what I'm talking about.

    Edit:

    Good luck, man.
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    (Original post by therealOG)
    A Level, just because it is the traditional qualification in the UK. University admission tutors are used to A Levels, and those A*s look goooood.
    Unfortunately this is a figment of your imagination.

    University tutors are equally happy with either course.

    It is more about the candidate than the course they have followed.
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    .neon: why did you switch to IB?
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    I think both are ranked equally, but IB tends to stand out because of the broad range of subjects.
    However, I'm going to pick A levels (my school offers both) because you can specialise, instead of having to do a bit of everything.
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    i do a levels, and have friends who do the IB. A levels are good if you want to focus on one particular area, like someone said ^ sciencey/engineering areas, as you can take 3/4 sciencey a levels, no prob. with the IB you can still do 3 science/maths, but you also have to do a language, english, and social science/humanity. IB is good if you want to do a wide range of things, and maybe for Law the IB would be good, as it requires lots of independent work, and you can do a wide range of subjects, which could be good for IB.
    What are your predicted GCSE results? At my college you have to have 6Bs to do the IB, but from what my friends have said, you really need to be highly highly motivated, and have mainly A/A* predictions at GCSE, to realistically handle the work load. natural ability will help no end, tho that applies to A levels as well!
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    IB is better for you if you're definitely all-rounded i.e. comfortable with studying a language at IB level, and also being able to juggle sciences as well as arts subjects.

    A-Levels are more conventional and possibly better looking on an application, but I'd say IB is possibly harder.
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    Can I just say, I did the IB and yes, it was hard, but yes, it made Uni easier. It really prepared me for the workload we have now at uni. I've had most of the maths and physics in the IB that we have in first year. (Standard and Higher).

    And they were the two best years of my life.

    Edit: But check how long your school has been doing the IB. Some places where its only been up a few years, they don't have all the subjects, and it's less organised - it can be a nightmare then.
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    A'levels, cause they're just more cool
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    Neither is better regarded than the other
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    (Original post by Lawlet)
    .neon: why did you switch to IB?
    For a better school environment - my teachers in the new school aren't necessarily better (although I do have great teachers for English and Mathematics) than the ones in the previous school but the current school's program is much more structured. And that's largely due to the fact that it's a private school but we do get a 50% discount, so that's a plus. (:

    Another reason is a few months ago I did not have the slightest clue of what I would like to do at university level and knowing that the IB allowed me to study more subjects was definitely another factor which attracted me towards this. Also the new school offers only the IB.

    Admittedly, if I was presented the choice, right now, to do A-Levels instead, I would but only if it were done the UK way. That is, studying 4-5 subjects at AS in the first year and then dropping 1-2 in the second year in which I would study the remaining 3-4 subjects at A2. The system over here consists of studying five subjects throughout the course of the two years, three of which are at A2 and two at AS, with one of those having to be General Paper. (English - essay/comprehension) And the subject combinations are very restrained.

    But yeah, in my situation, the IB is my best bet.

    Edit:

    I'd suggest take a look at University courses - lots of them and maybe you'd get a better idea on what you would like to study in a couple of years. TSR has a fairly good page concerning this on their Wiki and there's always official websites of universities.
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    (Original post by .neon)
    For a better school environment - my teachers in the new school aren't necessarily better (although I do have great teachers for English and Mathematics) than the ones in the previous school but the current school's program is much more structured. And that's largely due to the fact that it's a private school but we do get a 50% discount, so that's a plus. (:

    Another reason is a few months ago I did not have the slightest clue of what I would like to do at university level and knowing that the IB allowed me to study more subjects was definitely another factor which attracted me towards this. Also the new school offers only the IB.

    Admittedly, if I was presented the choice, right now, to do A-Levels instead, I would but only if it were done the UK way. That is, studying 4-5 subjects at AS in the first year and then dropping 1-2 in the second year in which I would study the remaining 3-4 subjects at A2. The system over here consists of studying five subjects throughout the course of the two years, three of which are at A2 and two at AS, with one of those having to be General Paper. (English - essay/comprehension) And the subject combinations are very restrained.

    But yeah, in my situation, the IB is my best bet.

    Edit:

    I'd suggest take a look at University courses - lots of them and maybe you'd get a better idea on what you would like to study in a couple of years. TSR has a fairly good page concerning this on their Wiki and there's always official websites of universities.
    oh, so you don't live in england?
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    (Original post by Lawlet)
    oh, so you don't live in england?
    Well, no.
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    If you mainly care about getting the grades - A-levels
    If you mainly care about stretching yourself/keeping a variety of subjects - IB
    i wish i had the opportunity to take the IB
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    I think if you choose to take IB, you should bear in mind that you have really really good time management. Also, if you're not 100% sure that you'll be able to do well in each of your subjects because..well, lets say you get 5s for most of your subjects (just because most people tend to get 5s, from what I've seen anyway!) and 2 6s, you'll only be getting 32...
    Lets face it, most people (in my school anyway!) tend to get 38 or above so a 32 won't sound as impressive

    This is just what I think, so please please please don't take it word for word! :|
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    someone i know just before he started his a levels/ib decided to ring oxford to see which they preferred, and they told him catergorically a levels. so he did them, and he's got an offer from them
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    (Original post by mespannerhanz)
    someone i know just before he started his a levels/ib decided to ring oxford to see which they preferred, and they told him catergorically a levels. so he did them, and he's got an offer from them
    thanks, that is what i wanted to know, which one university preferred. Also what did they exactly meant by catergorically? (just to make sure)
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    (Original post by Lawlet)
    thanks, that is what i wanted to know, which one university preferred. Also what did they exactly meant by catergorically? (just to make sure)
    from what i was told, they basically said, we very much prefer a levels to the IB, without a shadow of a doubt. That possibly was specific to his course, i don't know what course he has applied for.
    hope that helps
 
 
 
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