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    At the moment I am doing my AS levels. I am really interested in doing journalism in the future and idealistically working for a broadsheet or a newsmagazine (Time etc).

    I know it's a very competitive field, but what would be the best degree to do to place myself in the best position? Also is there any other sort of things I should be doing to help me in the future? I would appreciate any advice.

    Thanks
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    Degree wise, I'd advise English Literature.

    You'd be assisted by essay writing A-Levels like English & History, mainly.

    - avoid things like 'Media Studies' - they wont help you.
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    Depends which area of journalism. PPE or English are usually ideal.
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    (Original post by Mr Inquisitive)
    Degree wise, I'd advise English Literature.

    You'd be assisted by essay writing A-Levels like English & History, mainly.

    - avoid things like 'Media Studies' - they wont help you.
    Why do you say this? Explain - I'm curious :beard:
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    As above something like English/history. Classic academic subjects will be best
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    do whatver u want and then a NCTJ journalism degree, its very interesting and hard subject
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    (Original post by CherryCherryBoomBoom)
    Why do you say this? Explain - I'm curious :beard:
    It's classed as a 'soft subject' and is generally not respected by universities. They look for more traditional subjects, such as English Literature, History, etc.
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    (Original post by Mr Inquisitive)
    It's classed as a 'soft subject' and is generally not respected by universities. They look for more traditional subjects, such as English Literature, History, etc.
    funny you say that, the uni where im sutdying journalism has 85% of its graduates going straight into graduate-level journalism jobs, and most have BTECs.
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    (Original post by Anabolicminds)
    funny you say that, the uni where im sutdying journalism has 85% of its graduates going straight into graduate-level journalism jobs, and most have BTECs.
    Not Oxford, by any chance? No, really? Didn't think so.
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    (Original post by razzlenewcastle)
    At the moment I am doing my AS levels. I am really interested in doing journalism in the future and idealistically working for a broadsheet or a newsmagazine (Time etc).

    I know it's a very competitive field, but what would be the best degree to do to place myself in the best position? Also is there any other sort of things I should be doing to help me in the future? I would appreciate any advice.

    Thanks
    I believe you stand the best chances of landing a good journalism-related job if you have a good foundation in writing and then perfect it with a post-graduate diploma in newspaper (or magazine) journalism. However, I would not exclude subjects other than English in your major choice, because a good journalist must have an area of expertise. You should definitely be good at writing, but you should also have something to write about, right? History, economics, international relations, politics or any scientific subject, if you like, are all good choices. Whatever you choose, best of luck
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    (Original post by Mr Inquisitive)
    It's classed as a 'soft subject' and is generally not respected by universities. They look for more traditional subjects, such as English Literature, History, etc.
    If that's the case, then why does it even exist in the first place?
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    (Original post by Anabolicminds)
    funny you say that, the uni where im sutdying journalism has 85% of its graduates going straight into graduate-level journalism jobs, and most have BTECs.
    I don't believe you.

    Real advice is this coming from someone who has worked at two of the top nationals in the world.

    1) Do a traditional subject at a TOP university.

    2) Build up a portfolio across print, broadcast, magazine, social media etc you need to demonstrate a range of skills across different platforms.

    3) Network - your contacts matter the most. If you don't know how to do this, you must LEARN.

    4) Work Experience - internships, freelance and ad hoc work are the way to go. There are many organizations out there for you to apply to. Alternatively, many people go and do another job/work in another industry and lateral back into the media after a few years. You don't need to go straight into journalism.

    Those three things are core. A journalism qualification is viewed by many as pointless, expensive and a real waste of time. If you want to study past undergraduate level then do a masters in a specialized area of your choice.
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    (Original post by razzlenewcastle)
    At the moment I am doing my AS levels. I am really interested in doing journalism in the future and idealistically working for a broadsheet or a newsmagazine (Time etc).

    I know it's a very competitive field, but what would be the best degree to do to place myself in the best position? Also is there any other sort of things I should be doing to help me in the future? I would appreciate any advice.

    Thanks
    Anything which you write essays for.

    Most English literature courses concentrate on literature (clues in the name) which won't help you anymore than any other essay writing course, so don't go for that unless you really enjoy it. I have friends studying history and classics who have all got experience with broadsheets and are working to be journalists, so it doesn't seem to me that the particular subject matters too much. Just do something respected and wordy.

    The most important thing is to get involved in anything journalistic - write for your uni paper, go to careers events and try and meet journalists who'll let you shadow them or intern at their paper. Try applying for work experience at local papers, you're more likely to get it and it shows that you're serious about the job when you come to applying for work experience at bigger papers or if you ever decide to do a masters in journalism.
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    (Original post by razzlenewcastle)
    At the moment I am doing my AS levels. I am really interested in doing journalism in the future and idealistically working for a broadsheet or a newsmagazine (Time etc).

    I know it's a very competitive field, but what would be the best degree to do to place myself in the best position? Also is there any other sort of things I should be doing to help me in the future? I would appreciate any advice.

    Thanks
    When I was in your position, I did a journalism degree

    If you get a proper accredited (NCTJ or BJTC) then you have a good chance at getting a journo job out of uni. It covers all kinds of writing and politics, economics, media theory etc.

    Here's my shameless plug - read my thread, it might answer some of your questions.

    As for things you should be doing, start a blog, try to get some work experience with your local newspaper or radio station.

    Hope that helps.
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    Ask anyone in the industry and they will tell you that journalism degrees are useless for careers in journalism. Same applies for other media type degrees (e.g. media studies etc) when it comes to media jobs.
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    (Original post by yituool)
    Ask anyone in the industry and they will tell you that journalism degrees are useless for careers in journalism. Same applies for other media type degrees (e.g. media studies etc) when it comes to media jobs.
    For what reason do they say this though? What's the point in the journalism and media degrees existing if they're "useless"?

    LOL, why am I being negged for this? I was only asking a fairly sensible question!
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    Practice copy and pasting Reuters' feed. Once you can ctrl c + ctrl v without looking at the keyboard, you're good for a career in journalism.
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    (Original post by razzlenewcastle)
    At the moment I am doing my AS levels. I am really interested in doing journalism in the future and idealistically working for a broadsheet or a newsmagazine (Time etc).

    I know it's a very competitive field, but what would be the best degree to do to place myself in the best position? Also is there any other sort of things I should be doing to help me in the future? I would appreciate any advice.

    Thanks
    - Study traditional subjects: English and History rather than Media or Journalism (and work your ass off).
    - Do student journalism: lots of it, preferably in a position of responsibility (like editor).
    - Figure out what area of journalism you want to do.
    - Start a blog: update it regularly, get a following if possible, write well.
    - Learn multimedia: figure out how to shoot basic video and edit it, understand how a DSLR works.
    - Stay up-to-date with social media: read Mashable, find out the latest trends in distribution of news, get a Twitter account and follow useful people.
    - Do work experience: whether it's the local rag of The Guardian, do as much as possible.

    Good luck. You'll need it...
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    (Original post by CherryCherryBoomBoom)
    For what reason do they say this though? What's the point in the journalism and media degrees existing if they're "useless"?
    Because more traditional academic degrees suggest more competence than media degrees.In the case of journalism, journalism degrees are considered pointless as you can get the required qualifications in a one year post-grad course. That is the route those in the industry would recommend: academic degree and then specialised post-grad course.

    There's a simple reason why universities offer these degrees, to attract deluded students. That's how they make their money.
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    (Original post by CherryCherryBoomBoom)
    If that's the case, then why does it even exist in the first place?
    Good question. The government essentially wanted to encourage the less academically able to go to university, so lesser degrees were introduced so that they'd have a chance to say that they'd at least been to university.
 
 
 
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