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Dissertation Questionnaire Watch

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    As some of you may recall I am in my third year doing BA Hons Football Studies, simply because I have asked for people to answer some questionnaires on here before. Here is another. After doing much research before this stage to inform myself and fine tune my methods, I have a ten question questionnaire, and one that requires no typing - only box ticking!

    All I want is your opinions on modern professional football in this country. I don't care if you love football or hate football, know everything about football or know nothing about football - I just want your opinions on several aspects of the game.

    http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/GTN776C
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    Much better than last time :yep:
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    Done. A couple of questions I would have liked to expand on the answer but I guess you're more after quantitative results.

    Obviously football related but what line of work does Football Studies progress to?
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    This course is really intruiging, but is it one of those things that if you are forced to study it you end up hating it?

    Survey done
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    Done.
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    (Original post by Mess.)
    Much better than last time :yep:
    Thank you. The first one was much more as a round of preliminary research. I received some very good responses from that, and it has helped shape the direction of my research. I gained some very usable quotes from some of the respondents.

    This latest questionnaire has received tons of respondents, and so far I have only advertised links on two sites.
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    Done
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    (Original post by Ronaldo VII)
    Done. A couple of questions I would have liked to expand on the answer but I guess you're more after quantitative results.

    Obviously football related but what line of work does Football Studies progress to?

    Because it is such a broad subject (as in general football studies, all areas and everything to do with football) you can go down many routes. Most of us are looking to go into coaching, and there are some modules within the course that have greatly helped, such as football principles and practices (tactics, being able to watch and read the game from deeper perspectives), coaching for football (simply coaching, but more football orientated), and in January we will be starting football management, which one would assume is about how to manage teams and players within the football environment.

    There is an alternative course, which is football studies with business. They appear to do less of the physical modules, doing many business modules combined with the more humanities type modules. These people would be looking to going into administration and finance roles, hopefully within football. Some of them may look to set up their own company or agency within the game.

    We also study psychology (I think applied psychology, where we have learnt how to carry out tests and observations, and psychology for sport which is more about motivation and how your environment may have effects on your performance) fitness, sports development in the first year and football development in the second year (that looks at grass roots issues, the structure of sport at a local level, and how to get more girls and black kids playing football), sociology of football (how the game affects so many people and what it means to them), globalisation (how the game has become huge, how it spread around the world, the economics and money within the game) and sports law (simply a module for all sports courses, but it was more about civil and criminal law).

    Those are the modules that I picked, but there are more, such as work placements (which are very hard to come by), event organising, physiotherapy, languages. I think there are more, but I can't remember them off the top of my head.

    We've had a few guest lectures from Matt Le Tissier, Lawrie McMenemy and Clive Tyldsley. There was also another commentator who has been all over the place, he is not particularly famous, but does work for ESPN on the Europa League.

    As you can tell, it can lead down many routes, but we didn't know that these routes were available to us at the start. It has greatly broadened our knowledge, but I think most of us are still looking at jobs within coaching and management, academies, maybe some FA administratorial jobs, and perhaps sports teaching.

    A few of the lecturers write books and papers on the economics of the game, another is becoming a Pro License coach after having experience working with Paraguay at the 2006 World Cup as someone who works with Pro Zone. If ever you hear someone say it is a numbers/percentages/statistics game nowadays, it is because of this software. Despite what the purists say, it is unbelievable, and incredibly effective. A couple more have jobs within the Local FA, and I think some are just general sports psychology or sociology teachers that do a few modules on our course.

    I wish I had learnt another language as this would open up more jobs for me, but once I have finished I vow to apply myself to the learning of another language. At the moment there are tons of jobs and opportunities in the USA, so it is not imperative just yet.

    The jobs and volunteer opportunities at the moment can take us to places such as:
    Belgium
    Ireland
    France
    Netherlands
    Moldova
    Ghana
    South Africa
    USA
    Kenya
    Argentina
    Brazil
    Mexico
    Canada
    Ecuador
    Chile
    Australia
    New Zealand
    India
    China
    UAE
    Bahrain

    I'm sure there are more, but the future is looking good for us, especially with the Olympics on their way in 2012, that will create a lot of sporting jobs in this country.

    Aside from the basic degree, we do need our coaching certificates. The university does quite a few, and supplements them too (I think we all get a free one, and discount on what is left). It also has a few, but not many, local school and organisation links for us to gain experience, but I think a lot of people have done it outside of that, myself included.

    It certainly has changed the way I look at the game. It's not just a game anymore. There are so many different layers and connotations that it is often quite hard to just switch off and watch a game normally, but I suppose you need your brain to be doing that to be able to get anywhere within the industry.
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    (Original post by Colbert)
    This course is really intruiging, but is it one of those things that if you are forced to study it you end up hating it?

    Survey done

    I've always loved football and I have always had a brain that can store and recite a statistic and obscure knowledge, so the content has never bothered me. One or two of the modules became boring because at some stages they weren't telling me anything that I didn't already know (from the reading lists, experience within that field, A levels, similar modules, and lecture notes that are put up on the internet way in advance).

    It has certainly made me even more passionate and knowledgable, even if a lot of it is due to my own reading and learning pursuits, something which has been sparked by and that I credit to the course.

    The knowledge certainly does come in handy when having a discussion or debate about football, since often you have a fact, quote or statistic to back up your standpoint, but it means I can't listen to Talksport or 606 without pulling my hair out. Some of the people who call and text in are such idiots that I can imagine you don't really need to be studying a degree in football to be able to tell how stupid they are.
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    Done. I remember looking at this degree
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    That sounds really interesting. I should have done something to get me into a profession linked in with football, like sports journalism or something. Perhaps then I could win the damn fantasy league. Though I'd then have football on the brain for 24 hours, instead of the just the vast majority :cool:
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    Done

    Sounds like a very interesting course tbh.
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    (Original post by TheRealDarthVader)
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    I wasn't convinced by the title of the course at first, but after that explanation I'm feeling pretty jealous; that's the kind of stuff I'd genuinely read up on for fun. I'm sure people like learning about science, maths, law etc. but I'm guessing a smaller % have a real passion for it; I imagine a have a genuine passion for what they study.

    Have you published any research yet out of curiosity?
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    (Original post by n1r4v)
    I wasn't convinced by the title of the course at first, but after that explanation I'm feeling pretty jealous; that's the kind of stuff I'd genuinely read up on for fun. I'm sure people like learning about science, maths, law etc. but I'm guessing a smaller % have a real passion for it; I imagine a have a genuine passion for what they study.

    Have you published any research yet out of curiosity?

    Not yet, I'm not really bright enough. I'm more at the stage of reading everyone else's research. I can't really see too many areas that need much research, which is why it was hard for me to pick a dissertation topic. It is kind of general really, and not too scientific, but then a very small percentage of people in this country who hold opinions on football are university professors who have stuidied every aspect of the game in great detail.

    The people who will make decisions on the future of the game are the mums that will stop their son from playing because she doesn't want him to turn into a chauvanist, and the dads who will stop taking their kids to games because of the swearing and abuse from the crowds. I suppose that makes it quite relevant, in that I am finding out what normal people think of football, and then projecting how that might have an effect on the future of the game.

    When I finish this and have much more time on my hands, I will look into writing for some websites as a hobby. They will only be opinion pieces, but with the one hundred or so books I have that are about the many aspects of the game, I feel I may be more informed than some.
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    Sounds interesting; I've read a lot of descriptive stuff about the "microcosm" of a football stadium and comparing the behaviours to normal "society", but I haven't really read much about what shapes those behaviours within a football stadium and why certain behavoiurs such as homophobia are so prevalent. Insight into that would go a long way into informing the second paragraph of your post above.

    The physical and psychology parts of your course sound the most interesting though, things I'd read up just to learn more.
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    Man I'd love to do a degree in this tbh.
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    (Original post by Ronaldo VII)
    That sounds really interesting. I should have done something to get me into a profession linked in with football, like sports journalism or something. Perhaps then I could win the damn fantasy league. Though I'd then have football on the brain for 24 hours, instead of the just the vast majority :cool:
    Sports Journalism is a hard thing to get into. Mainly because so many people want to do it. I done a little bit of sports reporting etc but i went down a different career path when an oppertunity came up. One of my mates from uni has gotten well into it. She's reporting on alot of North East football. Her day pretty much involves match reporting or meeting Steve Bruce, Alan Pardew & Tony Mowbray and interviewing them/or the players.

    Lucky her.

    But tbh Ronaldo (i don't know what degree you done) but if you still wanted to get into Sports Journalism and have some spare time. Just ring up your local papers/radio/tv stations. and ask for some work experience. Impress and you might get lucky. Most people that work in the business didn't do a degree that involved journalism.
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    (Original post by n1r4v)
    Sounds interesting; I've read a lot of descriptive stuff about the "microcosm" of a football stadium and comparing the behaviours to normal "society", but I haven't really read much about what shapes those behaviours within a football stadium and why certain behavoiurs such as homophobia are so prevalent. Insight into that would go a long way into informing the second paragraph of your post above.

    The physical and psychology parts of your course sound the most interesting though, things I'd read up just to learn more.

    A lot of the reason why people act so differently in a football stadium is because they can get away with it. They can shout abuse and sing offensive songs that they would be arrested for on the street, simply because so many people are doing it, and the authorities would have a hard task arresting and banning them all. When with a group of people who are doing the same, it becomes very easy to sing songs that poke fun at tragedies like Hillsbrough and the Munich Air Disaster.

    Men have a natural tendancy to compete (**** measuring), and so will often try to 'out bloke' each other in an environment full of drink and passion. One must try to appear tougher than the others, which is why they disobey stewards. How many times have you seen stewards back down simply because there is such a large group of fans, and all they are doing is standing?

    It is the loss of inhibitions and the diffusal of responsibility that causes people to act like idiots in that environment. You can liken it to driving a car. People act like idiots on the road in situations similar to those of human interaction, but feel they can get away with it because there is not the same type of communicated connection between two drivers as there is between two people in the street. This is why there are queue jumpers, because they won't be told off or shunned by other drivers, simply because each driver is in their own bubble which acts as a barrier to communication. Very rarely will someone honk the horn or make hand gestures, more often than not they will sit in their car feeling slightly aggravated. The amount of queue jumping that goes on in cars simply would not stand in a supermarket because the people will be in such proximity to each other that they would not dare take the risk.

    Homosexuality is seen as very unmanly. It's what poofs do, and poofs don't play football. Apart from maybe the current Arsenal team, whose fans seem to embrace the fact that most of their squad look like malnourished twelve year old boys, the underlying roots of football in this country are about manliness, strength and aggression. Maybe not so amongst the players in the Premier League, but only around half of those are British nowadays. Think of where football is really played - Saturday and Sunday mornings in the parks. If a player tries anything skillful, he is then kicked into the air at the next opportunity by an older opponent. Upon being cautioned, the player will claim that he is a 'cheeky little ****, and I had no choice'. It will come full circle in ten years time when the very player who was kicked becomes too fat and slow to play the game without resorting to fouling.

    Of course these are vast generalisations, but generalisations are there for a reason. If one is to act or play in a way that suggests he values skill or technical ability over grit and strength, he is seen as having something wrong with him, and that he is less of a man. They are weak, namby-pamby, pansies, and often cited as 'girls'.

    Skill and flair has always been seen as an unwarrented influence from the European and South American game, and they have always been a bit funny, resulting as them being seen as less manly. Being gay is so anti-manly in the beliefs held by some football fans (and surprisingly quite a few men in general) that homosexuals can't possibly be allowed into our great British *******s bulldog game. Many men don't want to be seen or perceived as less manly, and will often develop complexes that will have them ridiculing anything gay or unmanly. This, coupled with the hivemind mentality of a lot of groups of fans, results in a wall of anti-gay that is erected around the stadium. If a player has an injury, he is a poof. If the referee is seemingly biased towards one side, he has been arse licked by one of the managers.

    It is basically simple Freud. Sexuality is so important and reveres itself in all areas of our lives. Men need to be seen as bigger and tougher so that they can attract a better or more mates. This is fundamental to survival and the passing of genes. Now that humans have developed into social beings, it is not just about having the bigger scrotum or winning fights, but it can also be about wealth, reputation and status.

    Some of the findings from my dissertation research have been quite interesting so far. There is a surprising, and perhaps alarming number of people who would not watch women's professional football (women have also answered that they would not watch). What hope does women's football have of equalling the men's game if the best they can hope for is perhaps a mild interest? Sport is a reflection of society, and despite equal rights, the genders are far from equal. Sport is a choice that is open to all, so society is allowed to make its own choices. The fact that so many people admit to being sceptical about women's football, even in an ideal world where the quality is the same, is very concerning, and something I would not have expected as we go into 2011. The top women players in this country are going to make £16,000 a year. Forget quality and interest for a minute, the comparative wages between the two sexes would not be tolerated in another industry.
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    Women in the top English league will be earning £16k per year with their clubs but aren't they also on central contracts with the FA worth something like £20-25k per year, IIRC...? Put those figures together and to the large majority of the British public, that's a good salary.

    Not money I'd turn down and not a figure many others would. There will never be as much demand to watch womens football as mens football. That's because it's 'soft', there's little to no aggression, women generally do not tackle or make very half-hearted attempts to retrieve the ball from the opposition, on top of there being no pace or tempo in womens football. It really is like watching paint dry.

    I'm all for people and organisations to promote womens football and encouraging young people to participate in sport, be it netball, cricket, football, anything...but it gets a bit lame when you see/hear people trying to force their own agenda onto others...

    it all boils down to supply and demand, there isn't much of a demand for womens football and there never really will be. It might become increasingly popular but that popularity will hit a certain level/plateau and no matter what advertising and promotion there is, nothing will change.
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    (Original post by white_haired_wizard)
    Women in the top English league will be earning £16k per year with their clubs but aren't they also on central contracts with the FA worth something like £20-25k per year, IIRC...? Put those figures together and to the large majority of the British public, that's a good salary.

    Not money I'd turn down and not a figure many others would. There will never be as much demand to watch womens football as mens football. That's because it's 'soft', there's little to no aggression, women generally do not tackle or make very half-hearted attempts to retrieve the ball from the opposition, on top of there being no pace or tempo in womens football. It really is like watching paint dry.

    I'm all for people and organisations to promote womens football and encouraging young people to participate in sport, be it netball, cricket, football, anything...but it gets a bit lame when you see/hear people trying to force their own agenda onto others...

    it all boils down to supply and demand, there isn't much of a demand for womens football and there never really will be. It might become increasingly popular but that popularity will hit a certain level/plateau and no matter what advertising and promotion there is, nothing will change.

    We have to figure out why that is though. I don't like the thought that just because you are born with a vagina, you will never make lots of money from football.

    I totally and wholeheartedly agree with you that currently the standard is quite low, and there is very little aggression (something which, as a Blackburn fan, I have become quite accustomed to). Also, the goalkeepers are useless, but that is more than likely down to the fact that women, in general, are much shorter than men. A 5'4'' woman is defending an 8' tall and 24' wide goal. That leaves lots of space, which is why they score goals from anywhere.

    You believe that nothing will change, so why is that? Do you feel that women can never achieve the same level of football standard as men?
 
 
 
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