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    What career are you looking at, are you in?

    Name of your degree:
    Name of your university:
    Current/Perspective occupation:
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    Politics & IR
    Aberdeen
    Well I'll probably be unemployed after, going to go for a masters! (Gave up my naive UN idea after first year!)
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    (Original post by danielj315)
    Politics & IR
    Aberdeen
    Well I'll probably be unemployed after, going to go for a masters! (Gave up my naive UN idea after first year!)
    omg why will you be unemployed?
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    Politics
    Nottingham
    No idea yet!!
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    Political Science
    BUE/Loughborough (dual degree)
    Currently interning for an international NGO's Cairo office.
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    (Original post by Mo88)
    Political Science
    BUE/Loughborough (dual degree)
    Currently interning for an international NGO's Cairo office.
    is the money good?
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    (Original post by iheartmondays)
    is the money good?
    Well, I only get compensation for travel and lunch so no, not really =D

    It's all about experience and beefing up a CV, though.
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    (Original post by Mo88)
    Well, I only get compensation for travel and lunch so no, not really =D

    It's all about experience and beefing up a CV, though.
    now i feel that a degree in politics and ir is pointless. no one gets paid well after this degree...its actually **** :cry: i should have done law!
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    (Original post by iheartmondays)
    now i feel that a degree in politics and ir is pointless. no one gets paid well after this degree...its actually **** :cry: i should have done law!
    Well, I wouldn't say that. We're all recent graduates and I don't think anyone gets paid well immediately after finishing.

    Besides, you could always change to law or specialise in it if you really want to.
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    (Original post by iheartmondays)
    now i feel that a degree in politics and ir is pointless. no one gets paid well after this degree...its actually **** :cry: i should have done law!
    Well if you want to do law you will have to do the conversion course afterwards. Quite a lot of students on law conversion are politics grads.

    As for whether you get well or not....depends what you do. In general I would not say politics grads go into the top paid careers apart from the ones who do law conversions. Quite a few look to go into working for a political party or a lobby group etc, if you do that then its interesting work but don't expect top pay. Similar for if you work for an NGO or so on, you will usually need a period of unpaid work first and again pay is low. The problem with the "save the world" type jobs is that students at uni expect that all the top graduates want to go for high paying finance jobs so if you want a more ethical career you can get one, but in some ways those type of jobs are more competitive than it is to get into the financial ones, even though the pay is low. There are a lot of Oxbridge 1sts floating around the NGOs and that sector. It's probably a vocation for the rich kids with a conscience, which is why unpaid interns are widely used.

    I suppose you get a share of politics grads who just go off into general financial jobs anyway, you can apply to the Big 4 for accounting and so on. A small handful will get into the Civil Service fast stream but you are talking very very hard competition to break in there.
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    (Original post by MagicNMedicine)
    Well if you want to do law you will have to do the conversion course afterwards. Quite a lot of students on law conversion are politics grads.

    As for whether you get well or not....depends what you do. In general I would not say politics grads go into the top paid careers apart from the ones who do law conversions. Quite a few look to go into working for a political party or a lobby group etc, if you do that then its interesting work but don't expect top pay. Similar for if you work for an NGO or so on, you will usually need a period of unpaid work first and again pay is low. The problem with the "save the world" type jobs is that students at uni expect that all the top graduates want to go for high paying finance jobs so if you want a more ethical career you can get one, but in some ways those type of jobs are more competitive than it is to get into the financial ones, even though the pay is low. There are a lot of Oxbridge 1sts floating around the NGOs and that sector. It's probably a vocation for the rich kids with a conscience, which is why unpaid interns are widely used.

    I suppose you get a share of politics grads who just go off into general financial jobs anyway, you can apply to the Big 4 for accounting and so on. A small handful will get into the Civil Service fast stream but you are talking very very hard competition to break in there.
    is it that hard to get into the civil service?
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    MagicNMedicine is right. The highest paid jobs out there tend to be financial and legal. Of course you can do the law conversion, and many do. If you stay within the political field, you are unlikely to earn as much money, although you do get people like heads of Local Councils etc on hundreds of thousands. There are lobbying and research jobs that are over £40k, and you can rise in the field to earn a lot. But starting salaries are low.

    The Civil Service is pretty hard to get into. A very large number apply - 14,000 according to this report - for 400-600 vacancies.
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    PS Reviewer
    Forgive me if this sounds mean - it's nor intended to - but I've seen you posting a lot OP about employment and money fears with a politics degree. I totally agree with the previous two (excellent) posts that most people don't do politics degrees because they want to earn megabucks, and so as far as that's the case I just don't think you're going to get the reassurance you clearly want. Firstly because most of the posters here are undergrads and so won't have a career, bur also because the 'I did an IR degree, I earn 200k working in an IB' types are so rare. Most politics grads I know aren't penniless and they've got a job somewhere. The more ambitious have jobs they love and find fulfilling, the less ambitious have jobs. They're all on OK money but none on megabucks. Quite frankly if a whopping pay-packet is all you're fussed about you probably *are* doing the wrong degree - not because the two are incompatible but because there won't be many around you wanting the same things. Law or economics would be a better choice. If what you want is a fulfilling career that pays enough, then great, there are plenty that a politics degree can lead into. As with all things though it is mostly up to you and how far you're prepared to put the effort in.
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    (Original post by IlexAquifolium)
    Forgive me if this sounds mean - it's nor intended to - but I've seen you posting a lot OP about employment and money fears with a politics degree. I totally agree with the previous two (excellent) posts that most people don't do politics degrees because they want to earn megabucks, and so as far as that's the case I just don't think you're going to get the reassurance you clearly want. Firstly because most of the posters here are undergrads and so won't have a career, bur also because the 'I did an IR degree, I earn 200k working in an IB' types are so rare. Most politics grads I know aren't penniless and they've got a job somewhere. The more ambitious have jobs they love and find fulfilling, the less ambitious have jobs. They're all on OK money but none on megabucks. Quite frankly if a whopping pay-packet is all you're fussed about you probably *are* doing the wrong degree - not because the two are incompatible but because there won't be many around you wanting the same things. Law or economics would be a better choice. If what you want is a fulfilling career that pays enough, then great, there are plenty that a politics degree can lead into. As with all things though it is mostly up to you and how far you're prepared to put the effort in.
    You know you have just helped me! I want to do law and one of my options for uni is at Queen Mary (london) which I currently hold an offer for Law in. The rest is purely politics/ir but hey! I always knew after the Politics/IR degree I would venture out into Law. So I'm just going to go to QMUL! FEWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWW! Thank God for all of this!
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    (Original post by iheartmondays)
    now i feel that a degree in politics and ir is pointless. no one gets paid well after this degree...its actually **** :cry: i should have done law!
    I would disagree with that profoundly. If you naively expect yourself to become a millionaire upon graduation, you are mistaken. You have to have a big idea, not some narrow "In four years..." plan. I am planning up to 10 years in advance, and I am currently on track.

    It isn't getting the degree that matters, but what you do with it. Considering the cuts to courts, etc, I wouldn't think Law to be a particularly wise idea if you want a job at the end of it.
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    (Original post by IlexAquifolium)
    Forgive me if this sounds mean - it's nor intended to - but I've seen you posting a lot OP about employment and money fears with a politics degree. I totally agree with the previous two (excellent) posts that most people don't do politics degrees because they want to earn megabucks, and so as far as that's the case I just don't think you're going to get the reassurance you clearly want. Firstly because most of the posters here are undergrads and so won't have a career, bur also because the 'I did an IR degree, I earn 200k working in an IB' types are so rare. Most politics grads I know aren't penniless and they've got a job somewhere. The more ambitious have jobs they love and find fulfilling, the less ambitious have jobs. They're all on OK money but none on megabucks. Quite frankly if a whopping pay-packet is all you're fussed about you probably *are* doing the wrong degree - not because the two are incompatible but because there won't be many around you wanting the same things. Law or economics would be a better choice. If what you want is a fulfilling career that pays enough, then great, there are plenty that a politics degree can lead into. As with all things though it is mostly up to you and how far you're prepared to put the effort in.

    I would like to add that earning the big bucks depends on you as an individual. If you are the sort of person who wants to say "I am a good candidate because of my degree", you won't get far. If, however, you have genuine passion and believe, then you are more likely to earn a lot of money.

    I may have less experience than most, but what I have what they don't have is genuine ambition and enthusiasm. I don't get down over people fastracking into getting jobs rather than going to University, because I do believe that I will earn more than they will over my lifetime by quite a margin. Such faith is needed to get through the inevitable troughs that accompany studies.
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    (Original post by Stanley Baldwin)
    I would like to add that earning the big bucks depends on you as an individual. If you are the sort of person who wants to say "I am a good candidate because of my degree", you won't get far. If, however, you have genuine passion and believe, then you are more likely to earn a lot of money.
    This. Going into an employer and saying "I have a 1/2.1 in whatever subject, put me on megabucks within 5 years" isn't going to work. The problem is so many people have a degree now that it doesn't differentiate you from others. Chances are ALL applicants for a position will have strong academic credentials, so you need something extra. That could be through experience you have, or additional qualifications you might have earned, your personality and how it fits with their company etc. Preferably all of the above.

    I believe that nowadays you can do just about any degree and end up in well paid employment IF you apply yourself to it. At the same time, you could also end up in a worse paid position than somebody who has no degree. It just depends on what you do over and above your degree.
 
 
 
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