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    i was told that this year is the year to do 'extra curricular' activities to back up uni applications. im currently in the first year of a-levels and im doing duke of edinburgh. how many uni's actually think this is valueable and are there any other activities that unis deem as 'good'?

    thanks
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    (Original post by small'un)
    i was told that this year is the year to do 'extra curricular' activities to back up uni applications. im currently in the first year of a-levels and im doing duke of edinburgh. how many uni's actually think this is valueable and are there any other activities that unis deem as 'good'?

    thanks
    I'm not really sure how doing activities like D of E help your application as it seems so many people do it... Also as it is generally organised by the school it doesn't show much personal interest and commitment.

    I was the only person in my year not to do any D of Es, and it didn't seem to put me at any sort of disadvantage as I got 5 offers :/

    I think it's more of an advantage to carry on with/take up activities you are interested in and enjoy!
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    Also, I have friends that did D of E and didn't put it in their personal statements... Becuase really, how is it relevant to the course they may be wanting to study?
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    It's not really relevant to anything... especially the D of E since it's something you opt in, not exactly the biggest initiative in the world. Work experiences would be a better alternative, or attending lectures/seminars or workshops on your choice subject. Speaking about stuff like that would show you yourself actually went out and found something relevant to your course backing up your interest in it.
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    D of E is just putting together everything you should be doing as extra curriculars anyway. Volunteering, physical activity and a skill of some sort. People forget that there is more to it than just walking up hills for a few days. It's a good thing to do, there'll be loads to say in a university interview.
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    Can't speak for D of E, I don't know anyone who did it.

    'Good' extracurricular activities depends partly on which subject you're applying for. Anything which shows your dedication to your subject (being part of a book club if you're applying for English, for example) is a good bet. Apart from 2 weeks' work experience I had nothing relevant to my degree, but I did the Engineering Education Scheme, volunteered at a special school, conducted and composed for a school band, took dance awards and was a lower-school prefect for an entirely different subject. Which might all have been totally irrelevant, but I got 6 offers so it obviously didn't hurt my application. And in interviews, when they ask you those "Give me an example of a time when you had to work in a team", I was never stuck for an answer.

    To be honest, you can include pretty much anything, as long as you somehow use it to explain why you'd be such an incredible student. 'I was part of the school's table tennis 3rd team. This meant turning up to weekly practices, which taught me the importance of committing to an activity long-term. I also play the Hungarian noseflute in a local orchestra, and having to act on the guidance of the conductor has improved my ability to take direction and constructive criticism.' You know the sort of rubbish I mean. It's not what you do so much as how you spin it.
 
 
 
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