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I want to be a writer: How can I stand out? Watch

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    My main aspiration in life is to be a professional writer, hopefully at a good enough level that I might earn a decent income from my efforts. As far as education and personal involvement goes, I believe that I am heading in the right direction and, hopefully, am not doing anything to detract from my goals. I am taking subjects that I have been informed are relevant (aside from the obvious English Language and Literature, I am also studying Media Studies and Philosophy and Ethics) and I am applying in 2011 to study Creative Writing at a number of universities that, after much research, I have determined to have courses suited to my tastes in the area. I write a lot in my free time to hone my skills so that if the time comes that I might offer my work professionally, I will have developed my talent to an appropriate level. I mostly write fiction and have made considerable advances over the past decade in my abilities in terms of style and detail. I hope that I will be able to one day earn a living from this as it is something that I love and do so very much.

    However, I am aware to the point of crippling fear that the entertainment industry is very competitive and, if anyone can help me, I would like to have some idea of more ways in which I can be noticed as a writer. I know fully that writing alone when all of my work stays on my memory stick where no one will see it will never be particularly fruitful, no matter how much I practice or how good (or otherwise ) my work might be.

    I have been advised that I should write a blog, and I am in the process of looking into this option, but the vast number of blogging sites available make it hugely confusing. I want to stand out and not just be another random blogger with no readers.

    Realistically, what can I do to make me stand out more? Is there anything I can do to catch the attention of people who can really make a difference for me in this regard?

    Thank you in advance for any help you have to offer, as well as apologies for my long-winded request. I just like to make sure I've covered everything that I do not cause confusion.

    Doke x

    P.S., I am aware that this thread is also in another part of the website, but I accidentally posted it in the wrong area and will not try to make any excuses for my mistake.
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    Please? Someone must be a blogger. Ha ha x
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    Me too mate, me too.

    -Try and get an agent
    -Dabble in as many different genres and forms of writing as possible so as to increase your command over literal teachniques and understanding of the idiosyncrasies of each genre. It'll also give you an idea of what genre or type that you're best at and would like to devote most time to.
    -Get feedback from as many people as possible, especially teachers, people who know a lot about creative writing.
    -Send your efforts off to as many places as possible; enter competitions etc.

    -Always write; it's a cliche but you'll only get better through practice.

    PM me if you want to chat, it's rare to find many other aspiring writers. :five:
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    (Original post by Doke)
    Please? Someone must be a blogger. Ha ha x
    I've just replied.
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    Thank you so very much
    I have talked to my English teachers. One of them is very helpful because he's practically in the same boat that I am, still aspiring, so he can relate to me, but I want to be more successful than he is, so how valuable his advice is might be under question. My other teacher gives a lot of positive feedback, but has come straight into teaching right out of university so, again, I don't know how much he really knows about the industry outside of a purely educational context.
    My boyfriend says I just blog as well as write for myself and I totally agree, it's just that blog spaces are getting common to the point that they are becoming something that is partaken by a lot of idiots who think that their opinion is what everyone wants to hear and I want to be more than that.
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    Good, English teachers are a good place to start, and mine have been a godsend. Even in an educational context, their advice and knowledge of good and bad literature can't be anything but helpful.

    Don't blog, would be my advice, you're absolutely right, there are too many nowadays and, honestly, you're unlikely to get a large readership. Sure, you may strike gold and an agent/someone connected might just happen to stumble across your blog and love it, but it's unlikely.

    I'll happily read your work if you want, I'm by no means a voice of authority but I'm always happy to give an opinion.
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    How competitive is it to become a script/movie writer?
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    There are several things you need to do, all of which depend on where you want to go. Do you want to write novels? Biographies? Opinion pieces? News articles?


    Here's what you need to do:
    - Gain a sense of unwarrented self-importance. You need this as a writer. You have to believe that everyone wants to know what you think.
    - Be negative in your approach. People in this country like to read about people who fail and things that suck. Even if someone has spent a lot of time and effort on something, they suck and they fail, and your readers need to know how and why.
    - You must develop a very sarcastic and scornful sense of humour where you are able to imply that what ever you are writing about is so incredibly far beneath you that you wouldn't be writing about it if it wasn't your job.
    - From now on you can't enjoy anything. Everything is crap.
    - Hind sight is 20/20 - always remember that. When someone cocks up, use the knowledge of how and why to tell your readers what an idiot they are, and what a far superior being like yourself would have done in those circumstances.
    - Put your own spin on everything. Don't just report the facts, people want to know what to think about it too, and remember, everything sucks and everyone fails.
    - Never ever try or attempt to do the very things that you are writing about. Doing so would mean that you are on a level with the person that you are criticising, and as a writer, you can't have that.


    Hope this helps
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    (Original post by 419)
    How competitive is it to become a script/movie writer?
    Very, but if you've got on, the BBC do take in unsolicited scripts just in case someone's a secret gem. Good luck
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    (Original post by KingMessi)
    Good, English teachers are a good place to start, and mine have been a godsend. Even in an educational context, their advice and knowledge of good and bad literature can't be anything but helpful.

    Don't blog, would be my advice, you're absolutely right, there are too many nowadays and, honestly, you're unlikely to get a large readership. Sure, you may strike gold and an agent/someone connected might just happen to stumble across your blog and love it, but it's unlikely.

    I'll happily read your work if you want, I'm by no means a voice of authority but I'm always happy to give an opinion.
    Thank you. This is certainly very helpful. I've been advised that blogging will help me practice, but I do a lot of writing in my spare time just for fun without feeling the need to publish it anywhere seeing as its readers will be low in number anyway. I am very grateful for the help that my teachers give me but I feel need more than advice. They're helpful in how I should improve my work and that is always helpful (likewise, would your opinion be as every critique is valid) but I feel like I need more than to be a good writer to achieve my amibtions. I also need to have contacts and be published and be advertised, which by no means do I expect to have right now, but as I'm going to university soon I would like to be making a start in a real industry so that there I have something that makes me stand out to the professionals.
    You are quite right, I do not expect to be stumbled across, which is why I would like to know what else I can really do to put myself out there because it is so hard and it is such a competitive market.
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    Specifically, I want to be a novelist, but I realise that maybe short stories or something similarly small might be a more appropriate starting point into the industry, so that I might work my way up from there. However, the problem I am facing is being able to put myself into a public viewpoint where I might gain some attention and hopefully some useful critiquing from someone who might be able to offer me a way onto the shelves, as it were, should I be so lucky.
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    (Original post by KingMessi)
    PM me if you want to chat, it's rare to find many other aspiring writers. :five:


    No it isn't. Practically everybody I know plans to write a book, in fact, aspiring to write has itself become somewhat of a cliche.
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    (Original post by Aeolus)
    No it isn't. Practically everybody I know plans to write a book, in fact, aspiring to write has itself become somewhat of a cliche.
    I think there's a difference between wanting to get out the proverbial book that "everyone" has within them and genuinely aspring to be a professional writer. It's one thing to want to writer a book, another entirely to want to share with the world the things that inspire you. As with all the great arts, there will be a number of people who want to "have a go", and a number who want their life to be dedicated to it.
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    (Original post by Aeolus)
    No it isn't. Practically everybody I know plans to write a book, in fact, aspiring to write has itself become somewhat of a cliche.
    Honestly, I'm not disagreeing with you, but I meant out of the people I knew. I truly can't name anyone I know who wants to write...:dontknow: I know that in the big wide world it isn't rare.....
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    (Original post by Doke)
    I think there's a difference between wanting to get out the proverbial book that "everyone" has within them and genuinely aspring to be a professional writer. It's one thing to want to writer a book, another entirely to want to share with the world the things that inspire you. As with all the great arts, there will be a number of people who want to "have a go", and a number who want their life to be dedicated to it.

    I don't think so, essentially it comes down to one main desire, and that is recognition. You, me, and all other 'aspiring writers' want people to know that we can write books and are really smart and deep and stuff. You said so yourself that you are not interested in writing for its own sake; otherwise you wouldn't be bothered whatsoever about the fact that your work would be sitting in a memory stick unread apart from by you. That is what all aspiring writers want, whether they give it 12 hours a day or just one hour a day, there is no difference between you.

    I am saying this as somebody who was in your position with your aspirations for quite a few years. I wrote two novels and sent one off to a number of agents. I recieved rejections from all but one who requested my full manuscript. That was 4 months ago and they told me to expect a 7 month period before they could get around to reading it.

    My advice to you would be to take it down a notch or two, you are setting yourself up for utter dissilusion. The publishing industry is a lumbering, slothful and avaricious entity driven almost entirely by profit. They will back a book full of pictures taken by Peter Andre of his feces before they back the next big thing in literature.

    Be pragmatic, that should be a cardinal rule. It will be the many inevitable failures that will test whether you really want to spend your life writing. (Also, friends of mine have said that their creative writing course were awful and they would have been better off studying literature or some other subject. I have never personally looked into the complexities of one, but that is what I have heard.)
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    (Original post by Aeolus)
    I don't think so, essentially it comes down to one main desire, and that is recognition. You, me, and all other 'aspiring writers' want people to know that we can write books and are really smart and deep and stuff. You said so yourself that you are not interested in writing for its own sake; otherwise you wouldn't be bothered whatsoever about the fact that your work would be sitting in a memory stick unread apart from by you. That is what all aspiring writers want, whether they give it 12 hours a day or just one hour a day, there is no difference between you.

    I am saying this as somebody who was in your position with your aspirations for quite a few years. I wrote two novels and sent one off to a number of agents. I recieved rejections from all but one who requested my full manuscript. That was 4 months ago and they told me to expect a 7 month period before they could get around to reading it.

    My advice to you would be to take it down a notch or two, you are setting yourself up for utter dissilusion. The publishing industry is a lumbering, slothful and avaricious entity driven almost entirely by profit. They will back a book full of pictures taken by Peter Andre of his feces before they back the next big thing in literature.

    Be pragmatic, that should be a cardinal rule. It will be the many inevitable failures that will test whether you really want to spend your life writing. (Also, friends of mine have said that their creative writing course were awful and they would have been better off studying literature or some other subject. I have never personally looked into the complexities of one, but that is what I have heard.)
    I do write for writing's sake. My point is that if I could make it into a career then I would have more time to dedicate to my passion. If I could live a life where I had the time to spend writing without worrying about what anyone thinks, then I would, but I can't, because I'll need to work to make money to live and if i can't live then I won't be able to write any more. I want to find a way to properly indulge my passion. I don't want to be billionaire from it, I just want to do it without being hindered.

    I have also sent off work. I have official critiques and I have been ripped off by literary agents who did nothing for me. Luckily, I am young and have the rest of my life to figure out how to do this properly, but the sooner I can make an impact, the more I can get out of what I do. Everyone wants to make a living out of doing something that they love. This just happens to be mine.
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    (Original post by Doke)
    [COLOR="Purple"]I do write for writing's sake. My point is that if I could make it into a career then I would have more time to dedicate to my passion. If I could live a life where I had the time to spend writing without worrying about what anyone thinks, then I would, but I can't, because I'll need to work to make money to live and if i can't live then I won't be able to write any more. I want to find a way to properly indulge my passion. I don't want to be billionaire from it, I just want to do it without being hindered.

    I have also sent off work. I have official critiques and I have been ripped off by literary agents who did nothing for me. Luckily, I am young and have the rest of my life to figure out how to do this properly, but the sooner I can make an impact, the more I can get out of what I do. Everyone wants to make a living out of doing something that they love. This just happens to be mine.[/COLOR]
    Well, you don't just write for writing's sake. You want to make money from it. Not that that is a bad thing but there is no overnight miracle explanation that us TSRians can give you. There is no one thing that we can suggest that will catapult you into stardom.

    I understand exactly where you come from, I love to read and I love to write too. I however know how ridiculously difficult it would be to make a living from writing novels, so I've gone down a different path.

    So in short, we can't give you the answer you want. To be honest, if I knew the way to become a successful -money making- writer then I'd be one :p:
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    (Original post by Kaykiie)
    Well, you don't just write for writing's sake. You want to make money from it. Not that that is a bad thing but there is no overnight miracle explanation that us TSRians can give you. There is no one thing that we can suggest that will catapult you into stardom.

    I understand exactly where you come from, I love to read and I love to write too. I however know how ridiculously difficult it would be to make a living from writing novels, so I've gone down a different path.

    So in short, we can't give you the answer you want. To be honest, if I knew the way to become a successful -money making- writer then I'd be one :p:
    Of course! I don't expect it to be easy, and I'm sure that every response comes from a good place. I just thought that any advice that anyone could offer might help me a little more and I hoped that appealing to a large number of people might strike someone who knows their stuff. I know that I will have to fight to reach the point that I might make some a living, or even a little money, out of my passion, if I ever do. I hope that the sooner that I put myself out there, the better. I do not expect it to happen overnight and I do not expect it to happen soon, I just want to do everything I can to pull myself closer to the goals I have tried to set for myself. I was always encrouaged to aim big and I want to push for everything that I've been told could be possible.
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    ebook? u dont even need a publisher.
    just get it out there and see what happens.
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    heyy this site is fab you can upload your book and enter it into competitions, feel free to add me as a friend when you have made an account ( dreamqueen28)

    www.bookrix.com

 
 
 
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