Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hey guys
    I am currently a psych student at Oxford and i'm finding the course there to be quite...intense to say the very least! Writing over 25 essays in 8 weeks aside from the statistics work really does kill!
    Anyway, I found that my workload and topics made me dislike psychology A LOT and I just wanted to know how psychology is at RHUL, what is the workload like? lecturers? topics? exam/coursework balance? how much work do you do in an average day? do you get extra help if needed? What tutorial work do you have?
    I've realised being happy at uni is more important than the reputation of the uni, and if you can give me any insight into your opinions then that would be great!
    thanks!
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    I'm a first year at RHUL, so I can give you a good idea of what the workload has been like so far, though apparently it does increase in intensity in second and third year.

    General workload: pretty heavy. It's not that we get loads of coursework (we're on our fourth essay, and have had two pieces of stats coursework along with two research method multiple choice exams and we're also due to have a stats mock in January) but it's the reading that really bogs you down. If, like me, you're someone who likes to keep up with doing all of the reading and sometimes even trying to do a bit of wider reading outside of the essential stuff, you're looking about four to six hours per lecture, so sort of twenty hours a week on top of the fourteen (I think it's fourteen, it's around that anyway) contact hours a week. Although I'm sure it's possible to do reasonably well without doing that much reading, to be getting strong 2:1s or stretching for that elusive 1st, that sort of amount seems to be needed. The content of most lectures is relatively easy to understand, though Sensation and Perception (as lectured by the head of the department, Zanker) is by far the toughest, with lots of difficult concepts and areas of psychology that are not even touched upon at A-level (or at least, wasn't touched upon by the exam board I took my Psychology A-level with).

    Lecturers: As a whole, incredible. Absolutely love the lecturers that we've had so far. The aforementioned head of the department is brilliant, perhaps not always the best at explaining the difficult concepts he has to cover, but always open to answering questions- as are pretty much all of the lecturers that I've experienced so far, to be honest. Steve Hammett (or, as myself and my friends affectionately call him, Stats Man!) is a brilliant stats lecturer who makes sure there's something for everyone in his lectures, so for those who haven't done maths for a long time, he guides them and makes sure that they don't get left behind, but every now and then he'll do a mathematical interlude to keep the attention of those who have done A-level maths and like the stuff. As a whole, the standard of lecturers in the department has been incredibly high, and even as someone who was aware of the strength of the department before arriving here, I'm still surprised at just how good it is. And the best bit is that they don't take themselves too seriously! The annual Christmas psychology dept. pantomime is a good example of that.

    Topics: A good mix. You get the usual stuff that must be covered by practically every psychology department in the country, but there's also a bit of a mix with some fresh material, too. Sensation and Perception, in particular, seems to be a relatively unique module (at least, my friends at other universities either haven't covered the topic at all, or they only get a couple of lectures on it rather than a whole module's worth) but even when the topic has been covered at A-level or previous, the lecturers manage to create fresh angles and it still seems relatively interesting (and that's coming from someone who really didn't enjoy the stuff at A-level). As a whole, there is a general leaning towards biological psychology, but if you like your social psych there's a fair bit of that too.

    Exam/coursework balance: I've covered this a bit before, but basically I do think the balance at RHUL is just right. The essays and other coursework come in a steady flow, so on the one hand it's not overwhelming, but on the other hand it's not slow. Living with people studying other courses, it quickly became obvious to myself and my other psychology friends that we seem to have probably one of the heaviest courses at the university, but even so, it's not a ridiculous amount. Yes, the research methods exams came as a bit of a surprise, and they do keep testing us on our stats, and it certainly doesn't seem to be easy to get a very good mark on the essays, but it's all part of the challenge of degree level psychology, and I definitely feel like I'm getting my money's worth. Can't comment on actual exams, though- sounds like there are going to be quite a few in the summer, and hence I've started revising this Christmas as there is a lot to learn and absorb over that time.

    Extra help: Myself and other psychology friends haven't really asked for extra help so far as everything's been made pretty clear as we've gone along, but for those who struggle with stats, there's a stats workshop every week, and likewise the lecturers have office hours in which we are encouraged to pop in and ask them any questions we have. Tutorials are another chance to ask for help, though I'll cover that more specifically in the next section.

    Tutorials: If there's one thing I haven't enjoyed as much in this course so far, it's the tutorials, though that's probably more to do with my tutor and academic advisor than anything else- others seem happier with theirs, though there's definitely a mixed response. We have them once a week, for an hour, and they're very handy in terms of asking questions, in particular to do with whatever coursework we have set at the time. We also tend to have one tutorial dedicated to each piece of coursework, so we're encouraged to do some research and share it with the other people in our group (the sizes of which seem to be around six to eight students). For example, I've got a presentation to do next term. That, or we'll get three or four questions related to the essay to answer, that sort of thing. Nothing too heavy, but enough to get us going.

    I think it's obvious that I love the department, and as someone who really values the academic side of university, I really couldn't be happier here. I even know a couple of fellow psychology students who hate RHUL as a university, but still appreciate the quality of the department. Especially when comparing to friends studying other subjects, some of whom have perhaps only had one essay to do all term, or who hate their lecturers, it quickly becomes obvious that it's one of the strongest departments of the university.

    I'm sorry to hear that you're not enjoying it at Oxford, but despite all my ranting and raving about how great RHUL is, I have to wonder whether it'd be a good idea for you to perhaps stick it out a bit longer? If you've only been there a term, it doesn't give you much of an idea as to what the rest of the degree will be like, and I know that for example at RHUL, even in the second term we have some quite different modules to the first term, so you might be surprised at how different things are in Oxford as time goes on. You're right that reputation of the university shouldn't be the key factor as to where you go, but there must be some other stuff you like about Oxford too? And life at RHUL is very different to Oxford- campus based, having to catch the train to get into a decent shopping centre, lack of nightlife, etc. Don't get me wrong, I think it's great here, but it really depends on whether or not it's your cup of tea.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by llacerta)
    I'm a first year at RHUL, so I can give you a good idea of what the workload has been like so far, though apparently it does increase in intensity in second and third year.

    General workload: pretty heavy. It's not that we get loads of coursework (we're on our fourth essay, and have had two pieces of stats coursework along with two research method multiple choice exams and we're also due to have a stats mock in January) but it's the reading that really bogs you down. If, like me, you're someone who likes to keep up with doing all of the reading and sometimes even trying to do a bit of wider reading outside of the essential stuff, you're looking about four to six hours per lecture, so sort of twenty hours a week on top of the fourteen (I think it's fourteen, it's around that anyway) contact hours a week. Although I'm sure it's possible to do reasonably well without doing that much reading, to be getting strong 2:1s or stretching for that elusive 1st, that sort of amount seems to be needed. The content of most lectures is relatively easy to understand, though Sensation and Perception (as lectured by the head of the department, Zanker) is by far the toughest, with lots of difficult concepts and areas of psychology that are not even touched upon at A-level (or at least, wasn't touched upon by the exam board I took my Psychology A-level with).

    Lecturers: As a whole, incredible. Absolutely love the lecturers that we've had so far. The aforementioned head of the department is brilliant, perhaps not always the best at explaining the difficult concepts he has to cover, but always open to answering questions- as are pretty much all of the lecturers that I've experienced so far, to be honest. Steve Hammett (or, as myself and my friends affectionately call him, Stats Man!) is a brilliant stats lecturer who makes sure there's something for everyone in his lectures, so for those who haven't done maths for a long time, he guides them and makes sure that they don't get left behind, but every now and then he'll do a mathematical interlude to keep the attention of those who have done A-level maths and like the stuff. As a whole, the standard of lecturers in the department has been incredibly high, and even as someone who was aware of the strength of the department before arriving here, I'm still surprised at just how good it is. And the best bit is that they don't take themselves too seriously! The annual Christmas psychology dept. pantomime is a good example of that.

    Topics: A good mix. You get the usual stuff that must be covered by practically every psychology department in the country, but there's also a bit of a mix with some fresh material, too. Sensation and Perception, in particular, seems to be a relatively unique module (at least, my friends at other universities either haven't covered the topic at all, or they only get a couple of lectures on it rather than a whole module's worth) but even when the topic has been covered at A-level or previous, the lecturers manage to create fresh angles and it still seems relatively interesting (and that's coming from someone who really didn't enjoy the stuff at A-level). As a whole, there is a general leaning towards biological psychology, but if you like your social psych there's a fair bit of that too.

    Exam/coursework balance: I've covered this a bit before, but basically I do think the balance at RHUL is just right. The essays and other coursework come in a steady flow, so on the one hand it's not overwhelming, but on the other hand it's not slow. Living with people studying other courses, it quickly became obvious to myself and my other psychology friends that we seem to have probably one of the heaviest courses at the university, but even so, it's not a ridiculous amount. Yes, the research methods exams came as a bit of a surprise, and they do keep testing us on our stats, and it certainly doesn't seem to be easy to get a very good mark on the essays, but it's all part of the challenge of degree level psychology, and I definitely feel like I'm getting my money's worth. Can't comment on actual exams, though- sounds like there are going to be quite a few in the summer, and hence I've started revising this Christmas as there is a lot to learn and absorb over that time.

    Extra help: Myself and other psychology friends haven't really asked for extra help so far as everything's been made pretty clear as we've gone along, but for those who struggle with stats, there's a stats workshop every week, and likewise the lecturers have office hours in which we are encouraged to pop in and ask them any questions we have. Tutorials are another chance to ask for help, though I'll cover that more specifically in the next section.

    Tutorials: If there's one thing I haven't enjoyed as much in this course so far, it's the tutorials, though that's probably more to do with my tutor and academic advisor than anything else- others seem happier with theirs, though there's definitely a mixed response. We have them once a week, for an hour, and they're very handy in terms of asking questions, in particular to do with whatever coursework we have set at the time. We also tend to have one tutorial dedicated to each piece of coursework, so we're encouraged to do some research and share it with the other people in our group (the sizes of which seem to be around six to eight students). For example, I've got a presentation to do next term. That, or we'll get three or four questions related to the essay to answer, that sort of thing. Nothing too heavy, but enough to get us going.

    I think it's obvious that I love the department, and as someone who really values the academic side of university, I really couldn't be happier here. I even know a couple of fellow psychology students who hate RHUL as a university, but still appreciate the quality of the department. Especially when comparing to friends studying other subjects, some of whom have perhaps only had one essay to do all term, or who hate their lecturers, it quickly becomes obvious that it's one of the strongest departments of the university.

    I'm sorry to hear that you're not enjoying it at Oxford, but despite all my ranting and raving about how great RHUL is, I have to wonder whether it'd be a good idea for you to perhaps stick it out a bit longer? If you've only been there a term, it doesn't give you much of an idea as to what the rest of the degree will be like, and I know that for example at RHUL, even in the second term we have some quite different modules to the first term, so you might be surprised at how different things are in Oxford as time goes on. You're right that reputation of the university shouldn't be the key factor as to where you go, but there must be some other stuff you like about Oxford too? And life at RHUL is very different to Oxford- campus based, having to catch the train to get into a decent shopping centre, lack of nightlife, etc. Don't get me wrong, I think it's great here, but it really depends on whether or not it's your cup of tea.
    General workload: pretty heavy.?? You are out of your mind. Dont listen to her, man its pretty chill. Yeah, if you are trying to do every piece of reading and homework and blah-blah perfectly its going to be heavy.(I am not sure if its going to be that heavy even then) But otherwise its pretty chill. Its really nice and so far quite easy. And what the..? The tutorials are the best part, if I've read that without the names I would've had no idea thats about RHUL's department. 20 hours a week of reading!? How slow do you read?? You are that penis girl, arent you?
    Anyways dude its pretty easy so far and if you are looking for a 2:1 it doesnt get too hard in the next years. I will give you some examples. For the so called hardest subject (yup it is the hardest) they gave us more than a month for our coursework. More than a month. And I started it 1 hour and 15 minutes before the deadline (with around 10 minutes spent on reading the slides and checking the book the day before) and got 55. And that is all the time I've spent on the subject. And it was even better on the stats coursework. And even if you want to do a lot you can still at least check the slides for 10-15 mintues per lecture and do quite good. But yeah, its just that the first year is really easy.
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TempleGuard)
    General workload: pretty heavy.?? You are out of your mind. Dont listen to her, man its pretty chill. Yeah, if you are trying to do every piece of reading and homework and blah-blah perfectly its going to be heavy.(I am not sure if its going to be that heavy even then) But otherwise its pretty chill.
    Really? Even if you're just doing the essential reading, i.e. the stuff that you need to know for the summer exams, it's a fair amount, on average a 20 page chapter per lecture which takes a good couple of hours to do if you're taking notes (which you should be as this is the stuff they are actually going to test us on, after all). Or are you just not bothering to do that? Plus I'm speaking from the experiences of quite a few first year psychology students who I've been in contact with through being the first year representative. One of the issues that has been brought up by students time and time again is that some are struggling with the workload, and at a Student Staff Committee meeting the answer provided by the lecturers was the admittance that there is a lot of work to do, but it has to be done. The lecturers certainly didn't say it was a light workload, though!

    Sure, if you're just doing the bare minimum, any course can be pretty light. And the essential stuff doesn't seem like too much right now because none of the lecturers are going to chase people up if they haven't done the reading- that's what the exams are for. But have fun cramming next summer!

    EDIT: Just saw your edit, thought I'd address a couple of points.
    1. Tutorials- a mixed bag, as I said. If you've got a good tutor or academic advisor, it's all good, and the idea of tutorials in themselves is good. I personally have found them to be a bit unorganised and not always that helpful, but yes, very much a mixed bag.
    2. Reading is one thing, taking notes is another. For me to do the reading and taking notes for a lecture, it takes on average 3 to 4 hours. Multiply that by the different lectures (and, for myself, add a bit of wider reading) and I get to about 20 hours a week. I can understand that it's possible to do less and get away with it at the moment, but as I've said before, we are going to be examined on this stuff so I think it's worth doing it now rather than panicking later on.
    3. They gave us a lot of time for that coursework, yes- I never said they made us rush with these things, rather that it was a continuous flow of work. If I remember correctly, we had an exam on the same day as the coursework was due in, right? A lot of people weren't happy about that, despite how long we had to do the coursework.

    And anyway, the proof's in the pudding. You got 55, I got 75. The OP is obviously a high achiever, attending Oxford and all that, so I can't imagine that if they were to change to RHUL they'd suddenly just do the bare minimum. They'd certainly find the workload a lot less than at their previous institution, but I wrote that post in the consideration of a strong work ethic mindset which I assumed the OP has. Plus, I do actually have friends studying the same course who would be in agreeance with what I've written.

    I think I know who you are- you're the guy who didn't turn up to the Psych. Soc. elections, right? Despite having put your name down? Oh, and the whole penis thing was a frape. That's what happens when you leave your door on the latch and someone takes advantage of the opportunity. Myself and my friends had a massive LOL at the post you wrote on my wall- made my day!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by llacerta)
    Really? Even if you're just doing the essential reading, i.e. the stuff that you need to know for the summer exams, it's a fair amount, on average a 20 page chapter per lecture which takes a good couple of hours to do if you're taking notes (which you should be as this is the stuff they are actually going to test us on, after all). Or are you just not bothering to do that? Plus I'm speaking from the experiences of quite a few first year psychology students who I've been in contact with through being the first year representative. One of the issues that has been brought up by students time and time again is that some are struggling with the workload, and at a Student Staff Committee meeting the answer provided by the lecturers was the admittance that there is a lot of work to do, but it has to be done. The lecturers certainly didn't say it was a light workload, though!

    Sure, if you're just doing the bare minimum, any course can be pretty light. And the essential stuff doesn't seem like too much right now because none of the lecturers are going to chase people up if they haven't done the reading- that's what the exams are for. But have fun cramming next summer!
    20 hours is such an exaggeration. I really havent spent 20 hours from the beginning on that on reading and coursework combined. And people contact the first year representative? Why!? Really, I am curious, you can ask so many people, why would you ask the representative? And that guy was good enough to get into Oxford, he is probably going to be better off than most people.
    And if I was doing the bare minimum I wouldnt go to lectures at all. Its too easy to get 40.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TempleGuard)
    And I started it 1 hour and 15 minutes before the deadline (with around 10 minutes spent on reading the slides and checking the book the day before) and got 55
    A 55? Wow, well done. Do you want a medal?

    You're going to have fun in your second and third years with that attitude.

    (Original post by TempleGuard)
    Its too easy to get 40.
    Why does that surprise you? 40 is an awful grade. You need to be aiming for 65 and above if you want a degree that is worth more than the paper that it is printed on.

    You should be studying full time, I.e. making your working hours up to 35hrs a week by doing reading.

    PROTIP: You will need knowledge of the subject way beyond the lectures for summer exams.
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TempleGuard)
    20 hours is such an exaggeration. I really havent spent 20 hours from the beginning on that on reading and coursework combined. And people contact the first year representative? Why!? Really, I am curious, you can ask so many people, why would you ask the representative? And that guy was good enough to get into Oxford, he is probably going to be better off than most people.
    And if I was doing the bare minimum I wouldnt go to lectures at all. Its too easy to get 40.
    Yes, they do, for a range of issues and queries. The whole point is to gauge the general opinion of students in the year and present that to the staff. Sometimes asking the lecturers or possibly even criticising them can be daunting, so students prefer to let myself or the other reps know about their problems so that we can pass them on and get some feedback. Fair enough if you don't believe in the system, but it's worked very well as far as I can see.

    I think you're missing the point of first year. Yes, the key thing is passing, but if you do get a 40 or a 50 in first year, what's the likelihood of getting a 60 in your second and third years? Surely you're just setting yourself up to fail to reach your potential?

    And please see my previous post, as I made an edit to that.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by llacerta)
    -
    What's this about a penis? :giggle:
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Neg me all you want, TempleGuard, you'll still be ****ting bricks comes to summer exams.
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    What's this about a penis? :giggle:
    Haha, basically I left my door on the latch in my flat, and then a couple of my friends went in my room and got onto my Facebook, changing my status to something along the lines of, "black **** is the best!" At that point I was friends with TempleGuard on Facebook, and he obviously saw it and then wrote on my wall that he "didn't want to know what colour **** is the best" and so on and so forth, then told me that he was going to delete me from his friends, which he promptly went on to do.

    EDIT: Sorry for taking over the thread, OP! I hope this information has still been helpful.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by llacerta)
    Haha, basically I left my door on the latch in my flat, and then a couple of my friends went in my room and got onto my Facebook, changing my status to something along the lines of, "black **** is the best!" At that point I was friends with TempleGuard on Facebook, and he obviously saw it and then wrote on my wall that he "didn't want to know what colour **** is the best" and so on and so forth, then told me that he was going to delete me from his friends, which he promptly went on to do.

    EDIT: Sorry for taking over the thread, OP! I hope this information has still been helpful.
    It was funny though.
    (Original post by llacerta)
    Yes, they do, for a range of issues and queries. The whole point is to gauge the general opinion of students in the year and present that to the staff. Sometimes asking the lecturers or possibly even criticising them can be daunting, so students prefer to let myself or the other reps know about their problems so that we can pass them on and get some feedback. Fair enough if you don't believe in the system, but it's worked very well as far as I can see.

    I think you're missing the point of first year. Yes, the key thing is passing, but if you do get a 40 or a 50 in first year, what's the likelihood of getting a 60 in your second and third years? Surely you're just setting yourself up to fail to reach your potential?

    And please see my previous post, as I made an edit to that.
    Oh no, you've got it wrong. I will get a first.

    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    A 55? Wow, well done. Do you want a medal?

    You're going to have fun in your second and third years with that attitude.



    Why does that surprise you? 40 is an awful grade. You need to be aiming for 65 and above if you want a degree that is worth more than the paper that it is printed on.

    You should be studying full time, I.e. making your working hours up to 35hrs a week by doing reading.

    PROTIP: You will need knowledge of the subject way beyond the lectures for summer exams.
    They are not even in the summer. And its a bit funny that you are telling me that I will have to study a lot before the exams when you seem to study a lot all the time. And 55 in an hour and half combined with the reading. Dont make it sound lame.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by llacerta)
    then told me that he was going to delete me from his friends, which he promptly went on to do
    Hahaha.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    I know a few people doing psychology at RHUL. Firstly, ignore the fact that the psychology buildings are ugly as feck, just spend your time staring at Founders with your back to everything else, and all will look magical!

    First year, it seems that psychology has a fairly light workload, most of the subjects do. There does appear to be a lot of presentations, though, in front of quite a lot of people. And the exams are meant to be intense...

    Complaints from people doing straight psychology (as opposed to combined with something else) is that you don't get enough help to do statistics and the psychology department is quite disorganised and try to cram in too much info into a lecture session.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TempleGuard)
    And 55 in an hour and half combined with the reading. Dont make it sound lame.
    Don't forget to write that on your CV when you end up scraping a 2.2.

    Btw, that **** won't fly in your second and third years. You would be lucky to get a 2.2.
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kat2pult)
    I know a few people doing psychology at RHUL. Firstly, ignore the fact that the psychology buildings are ugly as feck, just spend your time staring at Founders with your back to everything else, and all will look magical!

    First year, it seems that psychology has a fairly light workload, most of the subjects do. There does appear to be a lot of presentations, though, in front of quite a lot of people. And the exams are meant to be intense...

    Complaints from people doing straight psychology (as opposed to combined with something else) is that you don't get enough help to do statistics and the psychology department is quite disorganised and try to cram in too much info into a lecture session.
    I will say one thing- that last point is so true! They do try to cram in as much as possible, as though it's a race or something! They're great lecturers, but the sheer amount of stuff that has to be learnt in a lecture can sometimes be quite overwhelming.

    Haven't had any presentations so far, just got one due in for next term and it's in front of my tutorial group, so not so terrifying. I have a feeling they'll increase in quantity next term and next year, though.

    And is it just me, or does anyone else find the psych buildings strangely attractive? In a sort of ugly duckling kind of way? Like with the little covered walk bit and the mock tudor thing going on? Okay, just me...Haha.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    Don't forget to write that on your CV when you end up scraping a 2.2.

    Btw, that **** won't fly in your second and third years. You would be lucky to get a 2.2.
    Firstly, damn man, I wasnt attacking you personally. As I said, I will get a first. And it was an example of how quickly you can do the courseworks not my biggest achievement in life..
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TempleGuard)
    Firstly, damn man, I wasnt attacking you personally. As I said, I will get a first. And it was an example of how quickly you can do the courseworks not my biggest achievement in life..
    You're a fresher. You have no idea how to do courseworks.

    But yeah, do keep us updated on how well you are doing with that work ethic.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    You're a fresher. You have no idea how to do courseworks.

    But yeah, do keep us updated on how well you are doing with that work ethic.
    Its even better then. You can do the courseworks that quick, without even having an idea on how to them. Just come to the 2013 graduation when I am getting my first.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TempleGuard)
    Its even better then. You can do the courseworks that quick, without even having an idea on how to them. Just come to the 2013 graduation when I am getting my first.
    Alright mate, sure you will.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TempleGuard)
    General workload: pretty heavy.?? You are out of your mind. Dont listen to her, man its pretty chill. Yeah, if you are trying to do every piece of reading and homework and blah-blah perfectly its going to be heavy.(I am not sure if its going to be that heavy even then) But otherwise its pretty chill. Its really nice and so far quite easy. And what the..? The tutorials are the best part, if I've read that without the names I would've had no idea thats about RHUL's department. 20 hours a week of reading!? How slow do you read?? You are that penis girl, arent you?
    Anyways dude its pretty easy so far and if you are looking for a 2:1 it doesnt get too hard in the next years. I will give you some examples. For the so called hardest subject (yup it is the hardest) they gave us more than a month for our coursework. More than a month. And I started it 1 hour and 15 minutes before the deadline (with around 10 minutes spent on reading the slides and checking the book the day before) and got 55. And that is all the time I've spent on the subject. And it was even better on the stats coursework. And even if you want to do a lot you can still at least check the slides for 10-15 mintues per lecture and do quite good. But yeah, its just that the first year is really easy.
    Getting 2:1s and 2:2s in your first year are piss easy. I didn't go to any of my lectures or seminars (OK, maybe 1 in every 6 I went to, if I could be bothered...), and spent about 2 hours on my essay, including 'research' and still got 2:1s and 2:2s. It'd hardly an achievement.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Did TEF Bronze Award affect your UCAS choices?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.