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    I know most people on here are only just starting out on a career in architecture and so I don't want to be too negative about the profession (it's great - honest!!!!) but I would really appreciate some advice from some of the other members who are currently studying or have graduated in architecture.

    Basically, my architectural education is in a real mess. I mean I've really screwed up. I don't want to go into too many details on here. But basically what I would like to know is how can I get into other related careers which will use the skills I have learnt without taking other courses (that is totally out of the question). I prefer the practical, real-world aspect of architecture. The less (superficial) image-based roles which involve the work which an architect would have traditionally undertook. Such as Organising documents, planning construction stages/ H&S/ regulations etc. Something more related to what is happening on site rather than having sleepless nights worrying about matt or gloss presentation paper?

    I also have post part I (1 year) of experience in an architects firm doing some of the above.

    My concern is that any role away from architecture/ graphic design is totally out of the question due to the bad reputation that architects (and architectural education) has? So has anyone made the switch to a related 'serious' profession or can anyone offer any advice?

    Please. and thank you for reading.
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    You stay in architecture but you specialise in technical stuff, or project management.

    Or you can go into planning, or civil engineering.
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    Yeah you can go into the related professions. You could work for a contractor although it would probably be quite boring, you would at least be paid appropriately.

    (Original post by MetroS)
    My concern is that any role away from architecture/ graphic design is totally out of the question due to the bad reputation that architects (and architectural education) has?
    What bad reputation of architects? I was under the impression any bad reputation was all internal and stemmed from a minority. Most outsiders have no idea the industry is collapsing, fail to acknowledge the housing market collapsing and still see architecture as a prestigious profession, average salaries of 50k and all that.
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    (Original post by Ex Death)
    Yeah you can go into the related professions. You could work for a contractor although it would probably be quite boring, you would at least be paid appropriately.



    What bad reputation of architects? I was under the impression any bad reputation was all internal and stemmed from a minority. Most outsiders have no idea the industry is collapsing, fail to acknowledge the housing market collapsing and still see architecture as a prestigious profession, average salaries of 50k and all that.
    whatt! :sad: hmm, i guess i would have to change my career plans now. :sad::sad::sad:
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    (Original post by yeahyeahyeahs)
    You stay in architecture but you specialise in technical stuff, or project management.

    Or you can go into planning, or civil engineering.
    It will be hard to get into project management without having actually taken charge of a project on site which is unlikely having just had your year out. Most project managers I know come from a contractor background.

    Planning is an option although because of the collapse of the building industry there isn't much need for new planners and most councils are laying off planners.

    I don't think most companies will find an architecture degree acceptable to get you a job as a civil engineer without further specific training.

    You can go for any job though if you approach it the right way.
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    Thanks for all of the replies.

    (Original post by yeahyeahyeahs)
    You stay in architecture but you specialise in technical stuff, or project management.

    Or you can go into planning, or civil engineering.
    But architecture and project management are two separate things. It's very well saying to specialise in something but how many architects do you know that specialise in 'technical stuff' or 'project management'? Most roles connected to real-world construction are away from an architects office.

    (Original post by Ex Death)
    Yeah you can go into the related professions. You could work for a contractor although it would probably be quite boring, you would at least be paid appropriately.



    What bad reputation of architects? I was under the impression any bad reputation was all internal and stemmed from a minority. Most outsiders have no idea the industry is collapsing, fail to acknowledge the housing market collapsing and still see architecture as a prestigious profession, average salaries of 50k and all that.
    I don't think I would find it boring though to be honest. I would take a steady 9-5 job over the highs and lows of a superstar architect. What I am worried about is how difficult it would be to persuade a contractor to take your job application seriously (especially in these difficult times). You obviously aren't aware of the reputation architects have with contractors?

    (Original post by KeyserNI)
    It will be hard to get into project management without having actually taken charge of a project on site which is unlikely having just had your year out. Most project managers I know come from a contractor background.

    Planning is an option although because of the collapse of the building industry there isn't much need for new planners and most councils are laying off planners.

    I don't think most companies will find an architecture degree acceptable to get you a job as a civil engineer without further specific training.

    You can go for any job though if you approach it the right way.
    At the moment I am just looking to get experience of how the construction industry operates. Something which I got a taste of in an architects office but I still felt disconnected to a certain extent from the realities. Planning is interesting but I've heard a few horror stories and I have seen first hand how planners work and it didn't encourage me to pursue the career. Civil engineering would be great but I just couldn't handle the maths element.

    Am I doomed? :mad:
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    The whole construction industry is suffering it's hard enough to find a job as an architect never mind switching to say planning or civil engineering which are also specific specialist degree's when there are enough graduates of those degree's to more than meet the demand. Don't just look at the construction industry. Contractors don't think that highly of architects and there is a big reality disconnect between the two. Same with planners although understanding how architects work and think should actually be a requirement for new planners.
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    (Original post by MetroS)
    Thanks for all of the replies.



    But architecture and project management are two separate things. It's very well saying to specialise in something but how many architects do you know that specialise in 'technical stuff' or 'project management'? Most roles connected to real-world construction are away from an architects office.


    I worked in a company and they had senior architects that were 'Technical Leaders' and 'Project Managers'. Out of 100 something employees, they had about 7 project managers and 8 technical leaders, who never did the design work.

    You can specialise, my friend spent his part 1 year out in the technical team and spent all his time cadding technical details for construction drawings.
    He never touched sketchup, or did any photoshop during his placement.

    However, it happens at larger architectural practices.
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    (Original post by yeahyeahyeahs)
    I worked in a company and they had senior architects that were 'Technical Leaders' and 'Project Managers'. Out of 100 something employees, they had about 7 project managers and 8 technical leaders, who never did the design work.

    You can specialise, my friend spent his part 1 year out in the technical team and spent all his time cadding technical details for construction drawings.
    He never touched sketchup, or did any photoshop during his placement.

    However, it happens at larger architectural practices.

    your posts space my mind.
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    (Original post by yeahyeahyeahs)
    I worked in a company and they had senior architects that were 'Technical Leaders' and 'Project Managers'. Out of 100 something employees, they had about 7 project managers and 8 technical leaders, who never did the design work.

    You can specialise, my friend spent his part 1 year out in the technical team and spent all his time cadding technical details for construction drawings.
    He never touched sketchup, or did any photoshop during his placement.

    However, it happens at larger architectural practices.
    yeah I guess this is an option. Getting a foot in the door however at one of these offices can be really difficult though if you don't have an outstanding portfolio or aren't in the right clique. The workload is also pretty limited and very dependent on the economy (more so than a contractor). Plus I have heard quite a few horror stories recently about the bigger practices.
 
 
 
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