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Philanthropy plan: donate to charity every time you pay by bank card Watch

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    People will be asked to give to charity every time they use a cash dispenser or pay with a bank card under government plans to increase philanthropy.

    Banks are to adopt a system that allows people to make a small donation to charity whenever they withdraw cash.

    The Government also wants shops to offer customers the opportunity to “round up the pound” when using a debit or credit card, with the extra money going to charity.

    Under the proposals, anyone making sizeable charitable donations would get letters from ministers.

    Any National Lottery winners who donated part of their windfall to good causes would be publicised on television.

    The plans are unveiled on Wednesday in a discussion paper published by Francis Maude, the Cabinet Office minister, who wishes to foster a culture of charitable giving.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/n...bank-card.html

    I am in two moods over this. On the one hand, I would have absolutely no problem with shopping in say Tesco, spending £50.56 and then allowing the store to round it up to £51 whilst giving the £0.44 to charity. That's not a bad idea.

    However, I would become severely ticked off if every time I withdrew money I was asked to donate some to charity - after a while that would become very annoying. I happily give money to charity because I know out of the few pounds a week I give, a charity can do some fantastic work (with others help as well). But the idea that every time I do something I am asked to donate... -_- go away!

    So what do you think?
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      1)why dont they just make banks donate any charges from cash machines to charity.
      2) you cant encourage people to donate in return for publicity or a fancy letter, its not....well; charitable
      3) most of them lot are millionaires anyway, the whole 'do it for others' thing is slightly hypocritical.

      Edit:

      4) they could just take the millions of pounds that they would spend implementing it and donate that directly to charity.
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      "Charities" is a nice word... but how do we know the system isn't corrupt and the "charities" that receive the money are no longer nice?

      In other words, do we get to choose which charities we donate to? I mean, isn't that the point of giving to charity - you choose. Otherwise it's just another tax.
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        I wonder if the Rt. Hon. Francis Maude will be parting with his millions?

        As for the idea, yes, it's pretty useful. I know Sainsbury's do/did this, allowing you to round up. It worked well.
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        Donations don't actually solve the problem of being poor. The root cause needs to be uprooted.
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        As said above, it would be a charity "tax", with people resenting donating. I do believe, however, that banks of their own accord could implement a few charity-friendly changes
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        I get angry every time I get a service charge blackmailed out of me (especially when you think about whether the practice of topping up wages with tips goes on in your particular establishment). This would **** me off so hard.

        It's good to see the "nanny state" morphing into something more immediately acceptable to the right though, hmmm. People just need a bit of a nudge from the state to give more to the not-for-profits who will have to pick up the slack left by the government's own spending cuts. Thanks anyway though man. :yy:
       
       
       
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