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    Newbie to Philosophy, bought The Republic not too long ago and i'm going to start it after i'm done with the book i'm currently reading(The Man In The High Castle) and I was wondering where the Philosophy experts on B&L would consider going next? My guess would be David Hume but i'm also wanting to read the other big named Pre-socrates era Philosophers.

    And what would you suggest a good starting topic would be? Ethics? Epistemeology? Probability?
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      Have you given A History of Western Philosophy by Bertrand Russell a glance? Just to get a general overview of the topics, ideas and philosophers before delving deeper.
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      (Original post by Ape Gone Insane)
      Have you given A History of Western Philosophy by Bertrand Russell a glance?
      Nope, but I do plan on getting round to Russel eventually.Though I do have a 4 volume set of An Introduction/history of Philosophy books that I pirated not too long ago by a bloke called Anythony Kenny that seems very good.

      Also got every book in the A Very Short Introduction To....series on my computer, has some introductions to philosophical topics that i'm going to give a quick browse through.
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        See the link in this post: http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...1&postcount=42
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        (Original post by Ape Gone Insane)
        Have you given A History of Western Philosophy by Bertrand Russell a glance? Just to get a general overview of the topics, ideas and philosophers before delving deeper.

        Which edition do I get? When I bought The Republic the cashier bloke recommended me to get the Penguin edition so I bought that.
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        i recommend Descartes' discourse on method and meditations on first philosophy: there's a reason it's an intro text: its easy to read and fundamental to lots of discussions since it was written.

        I'd wait a while before you start on philosophy of probability, unless you have a maths background and I could direct you to some places...

        Regards
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        Decartes' Meditations is renowned as an easy and insightful read, all things considered.
        My personal favourites, for reasons of them being concise, relevant and digestible are: Complete Essays- Montaigne and Meditations- Marcus Aurelius.
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        (Original post by maskofsanity)
        I would highly recommend Nietzsche. Like Plato, he's fairly easy to read, albeit ambiguous, and in my opinion is a perfect start for new readers. I'd also recommend reading his works in chronological order, although would say his greatest book was 'Beyond Good and Evil'.

        Enjoy.
        Nietzsche is easy to read, hard to comprehend.

        wouldn't recommend Nietzsche for a beginner, for most people, without a "how to"
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          (Original post by King_Blumpkins)
          Though I do have a 4 volume set of An Introduction/history of Philosophy books that I pirated not too long ago by a bloke called Anythony Kenny that seems very good.
          They are good. Why not just read them and then follow up on whatever topics/philosophers you think sound interesting?
         
         
         
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