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    What do you think about linux any good or not
    You have got to admit some os's of it do look cool
    Here is and operating system called kubuntu

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    linux is the best, in my opinion atleast
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    I agree, I have used several different Linux distributions myself, including Ubuntu, Linux Mint, Red Hat and SuSe, I have also used both KDE and Gnome. Linux is by far a better operating system than most new releases, it gives many more functionalities and if you are building a machine from scratch it shaves a decent amount of the price. People often complain they cannot play games or use other MS applications on Linux but I have been using Wine for the past 12+ years and I have never had problems using any application I want!
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    (Original post by blueray)
    What do you think about linux any good or not
    You have got to admit some os's of it do look cool
    Here is and operating system called kubuntu

    I dont like Kubuntu tbh, I'm running Ubuntu alongside windows 7 atm, so much faster bootup wise.
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    Kubuntu has much faster boot up compared with ubuntu imo
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    Slackware or nothing!
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    is it good?
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    I use linux and then a dual boot system as obviously school had windows so i needed that too. I personally prefer linux - its easier to download things and so easyier to use. They also have different free downloads, which I found more useful than windows ones. (Labyrinth for one)
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    I'm currently writing this from Ubuntu 10.10. A while ago I had to re-install windows xp on my horribly slow desktop, so I decided to try installing linux as well.

    I barely ever use windows xp now... I've just got used to Ubuntu. It's way faster, more secure and incredibly customisable. The only downside is that it doesn't work easily with a lot of windows programs (mainly MS office, itunes, photoshop), but I get round that problem by dual booting.

    If I had a newer computer with windows 7 I'd probably switch to using that, but linux is excellent in the meantime, especially as it's free!
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    I hate it. A good proportion of network cards don't work (I have wasted literally about 50 hours of my life fighting network cards in Linux). Automatic updates regularly break the X boot sequence. It has mad-ass special moves like alt-sys-req-b and ctrl-alt-f5, which should be confined to Tekken, not operating systems. Different programs have their own clipboards, and use different keys and button presses to copy and paste. Watching a film or listening to music which isn't in an obscure format approved by open souce zealots is a severe trial. The file manager in gnome is ludicrously slow (though I think maybe you can speed it up by faffing with some options somewhere), because all l33t people use the command line for everything, obviously, and so don't care. The organisation of the filesystem is a cryptic, indecipherable mess, and to some extent isn't even standardised (/usr/share /usr/ /opt /usr/share/gnome whatever). The output of most commands at the terminal is cryptic and indecipherable. It positively encourages people to do everything in as complex a way as possible - it seems absolutely every system built in Linux ever is built on top of a mass of shell scripts filled with random funny characters and heaps of symlinks. If you're particularly unlucky, people use autotools and/or perl as well. Shared libraries are inconsistent between different Linux systems, as are install paths, making generic binary packages a nightmare. Also, it brought emacs into being.

    That was just a stream of conciousness, if I actually put my mind to it I could double the above.

    ARG I HATE LINUX
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    (Original post by James Gregory)
    I hate it. A good proportion of network cards don't work (I have wasted literally about 50 hours of my life fighting network cards in Linux). Automatic updates regularly break the X boot sequence. It has mad-ass special moves like alt-sys-req-b and ctrl-alt-f5, which should be confined to Tekken, not operating systems. Different programs have their own clipboards, and use different keys and button presses to copy and paste. Watching a film or listening to music which isn't in an obscure format approved by open souce zealots is a severe trial. The file manager in gnome is ludicrously slow (though I think maybe you can speed it up by faffing with some options somewhere), because all l33t people use the command line for everything, obviously, and so don't care. The organisation of the filesystem is a cryptic, indecipherable mess, and to some extent isn't even standardised (/usr/share /usr/ /opt /usr/share/gnome whatever). The output of most commands at the terminal is cryptic and indecipherable. It positively encourages people to do everything in as complex a way as possible - it seems absolutely every system built in Linux ever is built on top of a mass of shell scripts filled with random funny characters and heaps of symlinks. If you're particularly unlucky, people use autotools and/or perl as well. Shared libraries are inconsistent between different Linux systems, as are install paths, making generic binary packages a nightmare. Also, it brought emacs into being.

    That was just a stream of conciousness, if I actually put my mind to it I could double the above.

    ARG I HATE LINUX
    Just use kubuntu no problem
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    (Original post by James Gregory)
    Watching a film or listening to music which isn't in an obscure format approved by open souce zealots is a severe trial.
    Just like on Windows, VLC will play just about anything
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    yh in linux you have to select that certain update its annoying
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    Love it. For me it's proven quicker, cleaner, more secure, easier to use for computer beginners, more open, easier to find support for, more powerful, and in general, it's made my life much easier. Additionally, I don't have to acquire a licence for it - I respect say Microsoft and Apple's right to sell software, and so I don't pirate software, so Linux works out cheaper if you choose a free distro.

    Having said that, would I recommend it to people? It depends. For the average home computer user who's been using Windows for the past 20 years, no. Why? Because it comes with say licensing problems which make some drivers hard to come by, or at least require manual installs. People will already be familiar with Windows and will find it difficult to use initially, and unless they have a specific reason for switching, they'll be as well sticking to what they know. On the flip side, if a CompSci student were to ask me which OS I'd recommend, I'd suggest a particular Linux distro. If somebody with no computer experience asked me, I'd offer them a particular distro and offer to set it up for them so they don't need to worry about anything.
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    (Original post by blueray)
    Kubuntu has much faster boot up compared with ubuntu imo
    Actually I've tried both, for a college experiment/assignment.

    Kubuntu - 27.5 seconds
    Ubuntu - 18.8 seconds

    Guess it varies.
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    I dislike Ubuntu really... it's good for beginning but if you want to learn Linux use Slackware imo.
    Linux is definitely tedious at times. I dual-boot with Mac OS X and Slackware. Mac OS X is definitely for getting stuff *done* were as Slackware is more a hobby. I enjoy how everything is *perfect* in Slackware and the configurability. I've learned so much from using it.
    It's an awesome feeling to fix problems only with the command line and man pages- were as, say, 6 months ago, I'd be on support forums straight away.
    I don't think it's fair to compare Linux and Mac OS X since they're for completely different users. I'd be very hesitant to do coursework on Linux since I know there's a possibility that I'll have an issue at some point with printer drivers/file permissions/word processor randomly crashing/ etc. etc. though if I'm just messing around browsing and want to learn something then I'll boot into Linux. I really enjoy doing projects on Linux like installing server software locally and messing around with it, or configuring settings that on any other OS I'd use a GUI wizard on Linux, etc. etc.
    I can see my self in several years going back to Ubuntu, though probably Debian since I have objections to how commercial Ubuntu's becoming, since I can see the novelty waring off- though right now I'm loving it .
    I've also met some awesome Gentoo/Arch users on forums, none of them are elitist('cept maybe one... xD).
    EMZ=]
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    (Original post by NS17)
    Slackware or nothing!
    (Original post by Emor)
    ...
    Ah.. I remember using Slackware. I started when I was around 13-14 years old (21 y/o now). By far my favourite distro.

    Its been years since I stopped using *nix, I've considered returning to it several times but just haven't had the time.

    Since I purchased this Sony Vaio and I was never going to use 500gb (I use an external 1TB HD for my media), I partitioned the drive with the hope that I would soon install some form of Linux on it. Its been over a year and I still haven't.

    The fact I'm doing a non-computer related degree doesn't help and I always find myself extremely busy. Lol, this reminds me that I used to be a geek before. #

    Edited to add: Do any of you guys have a link to any software that will detect all my hardware and then somewhere I can check it against and see if my install will have any difficult elements to it?

    I don't mind going through it and I think the days of waiting 3hours for a full Slackware install to complete are probably over? Also, most driver issues have probably been dealt with?
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    (Original post by James Gregory)
    I hate it. A good proportion of network cards don't work (I have wasted literally about 50 hours of my life fighting network cards in Linux). Automatic updates regularly break the X boot sequence. It has mad-ass special moves like alt-sys-req-b and ctrl-alt-f5, which should be confined to Tekken, not operating systems. Different programs have their own clipboards, and use different keys and button presses to copy and paste. Watching a film or listening to music which isn't in an obscure format approved by open souce zealots is a severe trial. The file manager in gnome is ludicrously slow (though I think maybe you can speed it up by faffing with some options somewhere), because all l33t people use the command line for everything, obviously, and so don't care. The organisation of the filesystem is a cryptic, indecipherable mess, and to some extent isn't even standardised (/usr/share /usr/ /opt /usr/share/gnome whatever). The output of most commands at the terminal is cryptic and indecipherable. It positively encourages people to do everything in as complex a way as possible - it seems absolutely every system built in Linux ever is built on top of a mass of shell scripts filled with random funny characters and heaps of symlinks. If you're particularly unlucky, people use autotools and/or perl as well. Shared libraries are inconsistent between different Linux systems, as are install paths, making generic binary packages a nightmare. Also, it brought emacs into being.

    That was just a stream of conciousness, if I actually put my mind to it I could double the above.

    ARG I HATE LINUX
    I only have one thing to say to you: find another version/distro.

    Obviously the more hands on/technical type *nix systems are not for you. I enjoyed the very same aspects you mention because it gives you more control and flexibility. They are not for everybody, nor are they useful to everybody.

    Linux has developed immensely over the last 10 years. Even though I haven't been using it, I have been keeping an eye on the developments and there are plenty of distros out there which give you a desktop orientated environment (as opposed to command line). Everything has a GUI and very few things require hands on configuration. I have tested Ubuntu as a full install and some other Live-CD based versions and everything just seemed to work.

    You refer to the filesystem. The Linux filesystem is still based on the original unix based filesystem till this day for a reason - it is absolutely great. It out classes competitor filesystems by miles. The permissions system etc. has been copied/emulated in Windows over the last few years. The way the system is setup means it is much more difficult for a virus/trojan/other mallicious software to spread.

    I don't even remember all the technical details, but Linux > Windows any day of the week. I'm also starting to come round to the idea that a Mac > Windows after using it increasingly over the last few months.
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    (Original post by Steph90)
    Ah.. I remember using Slackware. I started when I was around 13-14 years old (21 y/o now). By far my favourite distro.

    Its been years since I stopped using *nix, I've considered returning to it several times but just haven't had the time.

    Since I purchased this Sony Vaio and I was never going to use 500gb (I use an external 1TB HD for my media), I partitioned the drive with the hope that I would soon install some form of Linux on it. Its been over a year and I still haven't.

    The fact I'm doing a non-computer related degree doesn't help and I always find myself extremely busy. Lol, this reminds me that I used to be a geek before. #

    Edited to add: Do any of you guys have a link to any software that will detect all my hardware and then somewhere I can check it against and see if my install will have any difficult elements to it?

    I don't mind going through it and I think the days of waiting 3hours for a full Slackware install to complete are probably over? Also, most driver issues have probably been dealt with?
    Assuming your using Windows I'm pretty sure Windows has something like that built-in. I remember using it a while back... It's not its primary use- it's supposed to be used to enable/disable drivers, but does a good job at listing all the hardware.
    For the basics I just Google '<laptop model> <distribution> compatibility'. For Slackware it wasn't so good since it doesn't seem that anyone who installed Slackware on a Macbook bothered to document it(not that I can really talk :P), but luckily someone did with a Mac Mini and the hardware's fairly similar(same wireless card, and EFI install processes etc.)- anything else that was different I just Google'd.
    The install's been quite problematic for me, initially. It took me several days of Google searches to actually be able to get it to boot and not have the screen just go black a couple of seconds in, then another day to get a WM going, and then around two weeks to get the network card working(though the two weeks were down to me being a total idiot[I was trying to install two drivers are the same time and they were both blacklisting each other] and procrastination). Then another couple of days to get the audio working, etc. etc. Though I've learned a lot from it and I think if I had to do it again on another laptop it'd only take me a week at most to have it configured and for the most part fully functionable.
    /I misread and thought you said the days of waiting days to install Slackware are over- I assumed you meant selecting packages to install individually which I read can take several days/
    And yeah, there's now an option to do a 'Full Install' or something to that effect so you don't have to select the packages individually. There's also an intermediate and expert install, though I didn't bother with them. The 'Full Install' was classed as newbie :P. The Full Install probably took around 2-3 hours. I've only been using it since 13.1 so I'm not sure when this was introduced.
    Hope this helps.
    EMZ=]
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    (Original post by Emor)
    .....
    I might actually give it a go in the new year. I've decided I am going to download and burn the DVD/CD tomorrow.
 
 
 
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