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    Hi, I have been brought up in a Catholic family, I attended Church every Sunday until my mid-teens and I was taught at a Catholic school from the age of 4-16. I would not personally call myself particularly religious. I do believe in some kind of God, but not necessarily the God portrayed in the Bible. What I have taken from my religious upbringing is mainly a personal set of beliefs of how to behave and treat people. I have found that a lot of my friends who have been brought up within the Christian faith feel similarly disbelieving. I can really only think of one friend who has a strong sense of faith and takes the bible word for word (I thought this was quite rare these days? Particularly with regard to the Creation story?).

    However, I have found that the Muslim friends I have made at uni have a much stronger bond with their faith. Although they may not be considered 'strict Muslims' (they drink, some of them eat non-halal meat, and those that can, date) they all claim to have a firm belief in God. They also appear to have very strong expectations from their family. Most of them have told me that their family would be unhappy if they decided to date or marry someone of a different religion, one even says that her father would disown her despite him having married a woman of Christian faith who converted just so that they could marry! In that friends case she is also not allowed to date at all, and has to do so secretly, nor is her older sister, despite her brother being able to date an English girl, is that fair? I would have thought that this would create a difficult family dynamic with children lying to their parents and such. But despite this, most of my Muslim friends would rather lie to their parents than confront any issues because they don't want to upset or disappoint.

    Why is it that those of Christian faith are more open to marrying into different religions? Why is it that young Muslims seem more reluctant to rebel or stand up against their parents? Why is it that young Christians are perhaps less reluctant to be honest with their parents, despite the possibility of hurting their feelings?

    I don't mean to limit this to just Christian and Muslim faiths, but they are the only religions I have had any close friends in!

    Just pondering, no offence intended, just wanted to start a discussion.
    Please no attacks! If I am ignorant, please teach me!
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    (Original post by theslightlyweird1)
    Hi, I have been brought up in a Catholic family, I attended Church every Sunday until my mid-teens and I was taught at a Catholic school from the age of 4-16. I would not personally call myself particularly religious. I do believe in some kind of God, but not necessarily the God portrayed in the Bible. What I have taken from my religious upbringing is mainly a personal set of beliefs of how to behave and treat people. I have found that a lot of my friends who have been brought up within the Christian faith feel similarly disbelieving. I can really only think of one friend who has a strong sense of faith and takes the bible word for word (I thought this was quite rare these days? Particularly with regard to the Creation story?).

    However, I have found that the Muslim friends I have made at uni have a much stronger bond with their faith. Although they may not be considered 'strict Muslims' (they drink, some of them eat non-halal meat, and those that can, date) they all claim to have a firm belief in God. They also appear to have very strong expectations from their family. Most of them have told me that their family would be unhappy if they decided to date or marry someone of a different religion, one even says that her father would disown her despite him having married a woman of Christian faith who converted just so that they could marry! In that friends case she is also not allowed to date at all, and has to do so secretly, nor is her older sister, despite her brother being able to date an English girl, is that fair? I would have thought that this would create a difficult family dynamic with children lying to their parents and such. But despite this, most of my Muslim friends would rather lie to their parents than confront any issues because they don't want to upset or disappoint.

    Why is it that those of Christian faith are more open to marrying into different religions?[/B] Why is it that young Muslims seem more reluctant to rebel or stand up against their parents?[B] Why is it that young Christians are perhaps less reluctant to be honest with their parents, despite the possibility of hurting their feelings?

    I don't mean to limit this to just Christian and Muslim faiths, but they are the only religions I have had any close friends in!

    Just pondering, no offence intended, just wanted to start a discussion.
    Please no attacks! If I am ignorant, please teach me!
    well, muslims are supposed to marry muslims. come to think of it, it's to a) prevent differences in the couple which could lead to separation after marriage, and b) mixing with people of other religions will inevitably cause one to adopt some of their characteristics, some of which may not be allowed in islam, such as adultery and gambling, c) probably so that one's faith does not become weaker in doing so, as they may well be included in certain religious things done by the partner. the islamic law sometimes sounds too harsh, but if one analyses, it is a way of preventing loss of faith or crimes. the archbishop did after all say that he thought some islamic laws should be incorporated into the british law.
    the fact that your friends brother was allowed to date an English girl isn't fair - that's not supported islamically, it's just favouritism between kids.
    muslims may seem reluctant because many realise that it's a precaution taken to prevent problems caused by differences later on in life. the islamic law tends to go by the "better safe than sorry" rule

    well, this is how i understand it anyway. hope i helped
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    Islam sais that Muslim men can marry non-Muslim women as long as the kids are brought up as Muslims
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    interfaith marriage is actually encouraged in Islam as long as it is between the monotheistic religions.


    One of the greatest things a man can do is convert someone to Islam....even greater when it is his wife.


    It's more of a culture thing than religous when parents don't want their kids marrying foreigners. Especially among Asians (not restricted to Islam, hindus also don't like their kids marrying white guys)
 
 
 
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