Bureaucrats and Quangos Watch

sweetgyal24
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I have always wanted to know what the two words; Bureaucrats and Quangos meant. Tried googling and researching and still wasn't really sure. When I say always, I mean since studying Alevel Law, two years ago, a long time I know ! Kind of forgot about it until now as I need it for uni......

Bureaucrats- the way we spend our money
Quangos- something bad? :confused:

Please correct any errors
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TShadow383
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Quangos: Quasi-autonomous non-governmental organisations
Bureaucrats: Basically middle-managers managing managers - usually used to refer to those employed by one of the many layers of governmental waste.
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Prince Rhyus
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In a nutshell, to deliver public services - whether they be "merit goods" (things that society decides the market cannot provide enough of - e.g. Health & education, thus calling for state intervention) or "public goods" (things where the benefits are applicable to everyone irrespective of who pays, eg street lighting to reduce crime) requires a method to collect taxes to pay for them, & requires methods to deliver the tax receipts. That is what a bureaucracy does.*

Quangos - Quasi-Autonomous-Non-Government-Orgs are bodies that are publically funded but whose functions need to be protected from political influence. Scientific bodies that provide advice, or grant-awarding organisations are classic cases.

Both come in for stick because:
Bureaucracies are v difficult to manage due to size & diseconomies of scale
Quangos lack democratic accountability

Both are also very easy generic targets - especially from the very MPs & ministers that pass the legislation that sets up quangos & accompanying bodies up in the first place!*
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Aj12
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(Original post by Prince Rhyus)
In a nutshell, to deliver public services - whether they be "merit goods" (things that society decides the market cannot provide enough of - e.g. Health & education, thus calling for state intervention) or "public goods" (things where the benefits are applicable to everyone irrespective of who pays, eg street lighting to reduce crime) requires a method to collect taxes to pay for them, & requires methods to deliver the tax receipts. That is what a bureaucracy does.*

Quangos - Quasi-Autonomous-Non-Government-Orgs are bodies that are publically funded but whose functions need to be protected from political influence. Scientific bodies that provide advice, or grant-awarding organisations are classic cases.

Both come in for stick because:
Bureaucracies are v difficult to manage due to size & diseconomies of scale
Quangos lack democratic accountability

Both are also very easy generic targets - especially from the very MPs & ministers that pass the legislation that sets up quangos & accompanying bodies up in the first place!*
Surely something that receives public money can never really be free of politcial influence?
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Prince Rhyus
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(Original post by Aj12)
Surely something that receives public money can never really be free of politcial influence?
What matters is the transparency of decision-making processes. What the politicians do is to set budgets and objectives (e.g. £100m to improve takeup of sport in schools by x%). While every MP would love to have that money spent in their constituency, the role of the quango is to distribute it in a fair and transparent manner so politicians don't get to decide which area does or does not get money.

One of the things that regularly comes up in the Commons from MPs is the proportional impact of the cuts in public spending. MPs representing the areas taking the biggest hits are naturally up in arms (in part because the impact of the cuts come up regularly in correspondence from constituents - it's not purely party political).
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sweetgyal24
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(Original post by TShadow383)
Quangos: Quasi-autonomous non-governmental organisations
Bureaucrats: Basically middle-managers managing managers - usually used to refer to those employed by one of the many layers of governmental waste.
non governmental organisations? Which one's? So dishonest MP's who claimed excessive expenses would be referred to as Bureaucrats.
I'm just trying to get my head round what the two terms mean in my own words
I might be able to understand it a different way if it's said differently as I'm not that clever
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sweetgyal24
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(Original post by Prince Rhyus)
In a nutshell, to deliver public services - whether they be "merit goods" (things that society decides the market cannot provide enough of - e.g. Health & education, thus calling for state intervention) or "public goods" (things where the benefits are applicable to everyone irrespective of who pays, eg street lighting to reduce crime) requires a method to collect taxes to pay for them, & requires methods to deliver the tax receipts. That is what a bureaucracy does.*

So this essentially means that other people not really part of the Government help the public?? I have just read collect taxes and got :confused:

Quangos - Quasi-Autonomous-Non-Government-Orgs are bodies that are publically funded but whose functions need to be protected from political influence. Scientific bodies that provide advice, or grant-awarding organisations are classic cases.

What do you mean by political influence ? So the Royal College of Nursing v DHSS could be a good e.g. then.

Both come in for stick because:
Bureaucracies are v difficult to manage due to size & diseconomies of scale
Quangos lack democratic accountability

What does democratic accountability mean

Both are also very easy generic targets - especially from the very MPs & ministers that pass the legislation that sets up quangos & accompanying bodies up in the first place!*
So judges make case law, statute law and both are like delegated legislation/ statutory instruments then?

Sorry if this sounds confusing!
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sweetgyal24
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(Original post by Prince Rhyus)
What matters is the transparency of decision-making processes. What the politicians do is to set budgets and objectives (e.g. £100m to improve takeup of sport in schools by x%). While every MP would love to have that money spent in their constituency, the role of the quango is to distribute it in a fair and transparent manner so politicians don't get to decide which area does or does not get money.

One of the things that regularly comes up in the Commons from MPs is the proportional impact of the cuts in public spending. MPs representing the areas taking the biggest hits are naturally up in arms (in part because the impact of the cuts come up regularly in correspondence from constituents - it's not purely party political).
I kind of understood this much better So politicians have to set up budgets like the cap which was explained on Question time. Quango's are people not part of the Government then- they are a private body/ organisation. Have quangos people (does that make sense), ever misused their power making it ultra vires, a phase used in Law.

naturally up in arms?? :confused: Thanks for your input
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Prince Rhyus
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(Original post by sweetgyal24)
I kind of understood this much better So politicians have to set up budgets like the cap which was explained on Question time. Quango's are people not part of the Government then- they are a private body/ organisation. Have quangos people (does that make sense), ever misused their power making it ultra vires, a phase used in Law.

naturally up in arms?? :confused: Thanks for your input
Quangos are definitely part of government - in many cases, chief executives of quangos are directly accountable to ministers and are appointed and dismissed by them. (The enabling legislation will contain a clause/section that empowers the secretary of state concerned to make such an appointment).

The thing is that quangos vary in their nature - depending on the powers under which they were set up and granted in the legislation that set them up.

There are many examples of quangos being pulled up by the High Court - i.e. when a petitioner applies to the High Court for a judicial review - http://www.biggartbaillie.co.uk/idea...judical-review
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Llamageddon
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A more pc term for "quango" would be "non-departmental public body".
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Prince Rhyus
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http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...89&postcount=5 explains more
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