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Dry Skin Tips for Face Watch

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    Every year the cold seems to suck all the moisture out of my skin - especially on my face. I always get these little dry patches on my eyelids of all places that I hate because they get irritated when I wear make-up. Does anyone else have the same problem? What have you tried that makes them go away?
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    This and this.
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    Diprobase. Buy it from behind the medicine counter at Boots. Costs about £3 for a big tube.
    I have it for eczema. It's basically industrial moisturiser. Instead of just sitting on top of the irritated skin like a lot of products to, this stuff goes really deep into it, helping it to heal.
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    Aveeno Cream (*not* lotion, that's for your body) is very effective and not greasy, it really helped me when I had patches of dry skin on my chin and near my eyes. It can feel a little bit funny if you use it all over your face (almost like it's very slightly sticky) but if you smooth it onto dry patches it tends to get rid of them within a couple of days. The GP can prescribe it for you, or you can buy it in Boots for about £6 for 100ml.
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    Aqueous cream, very similar to Diprobase as mentioned by a poster above. I tend to put it on at night before bed as it takes quite a while a while to soak in, then use my normal moisturiser in the day before applying makeup. Works a treat though, I'm very prone to dry skin (and consequently, eczema), and I definitely notice a difference if I start slacking with applying it.
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    erm well i use No.7 night cream at night and Olay moisturiser in the mornings. if that doesn't work you could always try vitamin E from the body shop.
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    I used to get this all the time. I just started using day and night cream. The night cream is really thick, so when you wake up in the morning your skin is really soft, and I guess the day cream just keeps it that way.

    I use garnier fructis stuff, but you could buy whatevers cheapest and it'll make the world of difference.
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    give a try to milk+besan.apply daily,and get smoother skin.it works.
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    (Original post by changoo)
    Every year the cold seems to suck all the moisture out of my skin - especially on my face. I always get these little dry patches on my eyelids of all places that I hate because they get irritated when I wear make-up. Does anyone else have the same problem? What have you tried that makes them go away?
    I have exactly the same problem especially as it's winter now. When I put foundation on it seems to just sit in the flaky dry bits of my skin. I know, it's manky.

    x
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    Oh and my only advice would be to carry around a small moisturizer with you and use it as touch ups every so often x
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    I have the same problem as you

    Try Eucerin Gentle Cleansing Milk and Lipo-Balance Cream. You can use the cream around your eyes and it works for me
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    (Original post by Lucyyy)
    Aqueous cream, very similar to Diprobase as mentioned by a poster above. I tend to put it on at night before bed as it takes quite a while a while to soak in, then use my normal moisturiser in the day before applying makeup. Works a treat though, I'm very prone to dry skin (and consequently, eczema), and I definitely notice a difference if I start slacking with applying it.
    Seconding this. Aqueous cream works wonders.
    I'd also recommend trying to drink more water, it really does help.
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    elizabeth arden (i think thats her name) 8 hour cream is absolutely amazing! but it is NOT cheap! if you want something cheap and easy to get, i'd advise e45 cream because thats normally really good. OR you could even just buy moisturiser and moisturise your face 2ce a day
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    (Original post by Lucyyy)
    Aqueous cream, very similar to Diprobase as mentioned by a poster above. I tend to put it on at night before bed as it takes quite a while a while to soak in, then use my normal moisturiser in the day before applying makeup. Works a treat though, I'm very prone to dry skin (and consequently, eczema), and I definitely notice a difference if I start slacking with applying it.
    Just a warning but if you're prone to dry skin and eczema, you may find that aqueous cream is actually helping less than you think. New research indicates that it can thin the skin significantly and aggravate eczema, so it might be worth trying an emollient that doesn't contain SLS (which is basically a detergent) to see if it helps:

    http://www.nhs.uk/news/2010/10Octobe...nd-eczema.aspx

    Until about 3 months ago I swore by aqueous cream, and then I got a huge patch of dry skin on my face which eventually turned into eczema and took 3 courses of steroid cream to get rid of (the third one worked after I read about this study and stopped using the aqueous cream). Now that I don't use it, I don't get flaky skin at all. Obviously not everybody will have the same reactions to topical treatments but I thought it was worth mentioning since I really wish my doctor had known it could be an issue the first time I went to see her about my face .
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    Use olive oil. People always laugh at me when I say this, but olive oil is absolutely brilliant for the skin. Just google olive oil and skin care.
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    (Original post by MsAnnThropic)
    Just a warning but if you're prone to dry skin and eczema, you may find that aqueous cream is actually helping less than you think. New research indicates that it can thin the skin significantly and aggravate eczema, so it might be worth trying an emollient that doesn't contain SLS (which is basically a detergent) to see if it helps:

    http://www.nhs.uk/news/2010/10Octobe...nd-eczema.aspx

    Until about 3 months ago I swore by aqueous cream, and then I got a huge patch of dry skin on my face which eventually turned into eczema and took 3 courses of steroid cream to get rid of (the third one worked after I read about this study and stopped using the aqueous cream). Now that I don't use it, I don't get flaky skin at all. Obviously not everybody will have the same reactions to topical treatments but I thought it was worth mentioning since I really wish my doctor had known it could be an issue the first time I went to see her about my face .
    Whilst I appreciate you're basing your opinion on your own experience, the link is not significant, 6 people isn't even close to a reliable sample - it means nothing..
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    (Original post by jk1986)
    Whilst I appreciate you're basing your opinion on your own experience, the link is not significant, 6 people isn't even close to a reliable sample - it means nothing..
    I agree that the sample is too small and I should have emphasised that it's far from conclusive, unfortunately it's the only work that's been done on aqueous cream specifically that I could find. However, when the study is considered in conjunction with the fact that SLS (an ingredient in aqueous cream) is known to irritate sensitive skin (which is often eczema-prone), the claim does seem quite plausible. That's why I suggested that it might be worth trying a cream without SLS to see if it is more effective, rather than saying that aqueous cream should definitely be avoided.

    Other users may find (as I did) that the film of mineral oil in the aqeuous cream gives relieves the dryness for as long as it remains on the skin, but that the SLS in the cream is actually perpetuating the problem so that it seems worse when the film of mineral oil is allowed to break down due to environmental factors or changes in routine. There are other emollient creams with the same moisturising properties for a similar price which don't contain SLS, so it's not like there's much to be lost by trying *if* the aqueous cream doesn't keep the problem under control to a satisfactory level.

    Additionally, people can develop allergies to products they were previously fine with (which I think happened to me with the aqueous cream), so even if it's not worth looking into now it may be worth bearing in mind for the future .
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    I have extremely dry skin in both the winter and the summer, to be honest, it an all year round (all-life-round) condition. I am basically allergic to everything, cats, dogs, horses, snakes, feathers, wool, lycra, plastic, rubber, peanuts, vegetables, the smell of books - i.e. dust, etc you get my drift. My life is not easy to live and my face is ugly because of the dry skin.

    Oh yes, the question, the solution - THERE IS NONE, DEAL WITH IT, I DO.
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    Do you use moisturiser in the first place? That could well be part of the problem, I've learnt that some people don't moisturise at all.

    I just simply use a dove or palmer's moisturiser.

    I've never really felt the benefits of St Ives
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    Slap your face with petroleum jelly.
 
 
 
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