From BEng Engineering to MSc Economics. Possible? Watch

Sine nomine
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I am a second year BEng Civil Engineering student at an average ranked but traditional university, and am predicted a 1st class.

I missed a 2.1 by 1% for my first maths module (complex numbers, integration, differentiation, number systems, trigonometry), but scored 81% in the proceding maths module (differential equations, partial differentiation, mclaurin & taylor series and linear algebra) and am confident that i'll get at least 80% in the statistics module that I just did this semester (binomial, normal, weibull, log normal distributions etc.)

I've been looking at the following graduate diplomas:

Warwick
Bristol
Nottingham
LSE
Cambridge

And the following 1-year MSc which apparently takes on physical science and mathematics graduates as well as economics ones:

Trinity College, Dublin

What do you reckon my chances are? What other decent economics courses do you reckon are suitable for me to apply for?

Thanks in advance.
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MagicNMedicine
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You have pretty much got it covered. You will need to do a graduate diploma before an MSc. With the maths you have done I expect you will have no problems getting onto a graduate diploma as those universities want people with a quantitative degree background. Bear in mind that the core content of the diploma will be intense, it is a very accelerated programme, but you should find the maths ok.

This is what Arsene Wenger did when he realised he wasn't good enough to turn professional as a player....he had a BEng and went on to do a Masters in Economics.
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Sine nomine
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http://www.rhul.ac.uk/economics/stud...uirements.html

Does this make me eligible for the MSc in Economics at RHUL without having to do the postgraduate diploma?

I've also noticed that for the Bristol MSc in Economics, Mathematics, Physics and Engineering graduates can progress directly onto these under exceptional circumstances and with first class honours. How possible is this?

I understand I should contact the relevant departments, and I am doing so, but you seem to be very knowledgeable in this. Thanks.
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MagicNMedicine
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I've never heard of going straight on to MSc Economics from an Engineering degree without the diploma and I personally would not recommend it. Even if your maths is perfect you still have a lot of core micro and macroeconomic knowledge which you would need to pick up to be able to start an MSc, as an MSc does assume a lot of prior knowledge. You can pick up what you need in a year on a diploma but I just think if you start an MSc, even if they will take you, without having done economics before then you will not be able to catch up, by the time you are sort of finding your feet with the basics of economics you'll find 10 weeks have gone and its the end of Semester 1...half way through the course....you're supposed to already have your dissertation title sorted, etc
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.ACS.
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(Original post by MagicNMedicine)
I've never heard of going straight on to MSc Economics from an Engineering degree without the diploma and I personally would not recommend it.
There's actually a member on TSR who did his undergraduate at Imperial in physics, achieved a 1st, and then was accepted by a number of top universities for direct entry onto their MSc programmes. Admittedly though he ended up going to Oxford since he felt the two year programme would provide him with a better grounding.
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Sine nomine
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(Original post by .ACS.)
There's actually a member on TSR who did his undergraduate at Imperial in physics, achieved a 1st, and then was accepted by a number of top universities for direct entry onto their MSc programmes. Admittedly though he ended up going to Oxford since he felt the two year programme would provide him with a better grounding.
Interesting. Although obviously my average university BEng isn't anywhere near as impressive as a 1st in Physics from Imperial (presumably even an MPhys?).

Come to think of it, I suppose i'll feel a lot more comfortable doing a graduate diploma first. I never did economics in secondary school, and even though I'm an avid reader of global affairs, commerce, and know the fundamentals of micro and macro economics, it's still to a very basic standard.
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yoyo462001
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(Original post by Sine nomine)
Interesting. Although obviously my average university BEng isn't anywhere near as impressive as a 1st in Physics from Imperial (presumably even an MPhys?).

Come to think of it, I suppose i'll feel a lot more comfortable doing a graduate diploma first. I never did economics in secondary school, and even though I'm an avid reader of global affairs, commerce, and know the fundamentals of micro and macro economics, it's still to a very basic standard.
I think going from not knowing a simple Supply and Demand digram to doing advanced macro/micro within a very short space of time is far too much for someone to cope with, then again you could be a genius for all I know :p:
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MagicNMedicine
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(Original post by Sine nomine)
Interesting. Although obviously my average university BEng isn't anywhere near as impressive as a 1st in Physics from Imperial (presumably even an MPhys?).

Come to think of it, I suppose i'll feel a lot more comfortable doing a graduate diploma first. I never did economics in secondary school, and even though I'm an avid reader of global affairs, commerce, and know the fundamentals of micro and macro economics, it's still to a very basic standard.
Yes I bet even that guy with a 1st in Physics would struggle in MSc Economics. I know it takes another year of study and you have to pay more but I would go down the route of the diploma, better to get a high mark in your Engineering degree, followed by a high mark in the Diploma, followed by a high mark in an MSc, rather than just scrape a pass on MSc and have a CV that says "I was good at Engineering, I had a go at converting to Economics but I wasn't that good at that so I should have stayed with Engineering". If the money etc is a problem then you don't necessarily have to do the Diploma and MSc in concurrent years.
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Mustard-man
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Do it properly at a good university (i.e. take the diploma route). I know someone currently doing MSc Econ at Warwick. He has MSci Theoretical Physics from Durham, but had to take the Econ Diploma nonetheless. Given your BEng Civil Engineering, I very much doubt it's sufficient, especially for the universities you have listed.
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wizz_kid
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Could some1 plz temme what a graduate diploma is?
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Mustard-man
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(Original post by wizz_kid)
Could some1 plz temme what a graduate diploma is?
It's basically an intensive foundation year for degree holders who have insufficient background in the course in question. It covers relevant material and equip them with fundamental techniques to bring them up to level with fellow students for graduate masters teaching.
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wizz_kid
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(Original post by Mustard-man)
It's basically an intensive foundation year for degree holders who have insufficient background in the course in question. It covers relevant material and equip them with fundamental techniques to bring them up to level with fellow students for graduate masters teaching.
O. So you do a BEng followed by a diploma year and then another year which is MSc Econ?
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Mustard-man
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(Original post by wizz_kid)
O. So you do a BEng followed by a diploma year and then another year which is MSc Econ?
Yup, if you do not qualify for direct MSc entry.
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wizz_kid
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(Original post by Mustard-man)
Yup, if you do not qualify for direct MSc entry.
Thanks mate!
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Sine nomine
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(Original post by Mustard-man)
Do it properly at a good university (i.e. take the diploma route). I know someone currently doing MSc Econ at Warwick. He has MSci Theoretical Physics from Durham, but had to take the Econ Diploma nonetheless. Given your BEng Civil Engineering, I very much doubt it's sufficient, especially for the universities you have listed.
Alright cheers for the advice. Is the graduate diploma in economics very intensive?
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Mustard-man
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(Original post by Sine nomine)
Alright cheers for the advice. Is the graduate diploma in economics very intensive?
I've not a clue, but I suspect so because MSc is a ***** for me atm.
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MagicNMedicine
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(Original post by Sine nomine)
Alright cheers for the advice. Is the graduate diploma in economics very intensive?
Usually its pretty much the second year of a BSc. At most unis in economics, the first year is a kind of intro level, bit more than A level type course. Second year is where all the core micro and macro is taught and third year is generally more specialised options where people go into more detail in specific areas (transport, development, climate change, monetary economics or whatever). A graduate diploma only has a year to get you some sort of economics background to be able to do an MSc so they will focus on the core micro and macro which is usually a 2nd year thing. You will probably do a short pre-sessional course before the main course starts, where they do a quick run over 1st year undergrad economics, then they throw you straight in at the deep end with 2nd year undergrads. Also you will get put on some maths, stats and maybe econometrics as well. Obviously it's better to have done 3 years of Economics before an MSc than 1, but I think if your maths and stats is up to scratch, and you've worked through a full "intermediate level" micro and macro textbook (eg Varian/Perloff or Blanchard/Mankiw) then you will have enough economic knowledge to be able to pick up an MSc, although MScs are hard work.

I remember one of our tutors telling us that if you'd gone through a full year long level 2 (ie intermediate) course in micro and macroeconomics, you'd have enough background to start learning pretty much any new topic in economics, so as far as prerequisites go thats what a Diploma will focus on. In terms of being able to think like an economist, Graduate Diploma graduates are probably about as well equipped as BSc grads, its just the BSc grads will have had time to specialise in some more areas on their course.
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gusona
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this post is quite old but I do have similar confusion about getting into masters in economics after engineering. what are the best diploma courses in economics in UK or anywhere in the world?
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