Differences between ICT and Computing and whether if it gives good careers or not?

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shawnalex
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#1
Report Thread starter 11 years ago
#1
Hi, sorry if you don't understand the title just tell me if you don't understand.

Really what I'm looking for is the differences between the two. I hear that one of them has alot of coursework, is more academic than the other, boring and can be stressful and etc. I'm just trying to help a friend as he's needing help. He's not so good at studying as he got B's and C's at GCSE and he's doing Chemistry, Biology and Maths for A-Level and regrets picking them as they involve alot of revising and putting in alot of effort (which he does) and such and tells me that he only suffers at these subjects as he's not capable of memorising information which he's not good at. He tried every revision technique he got taught by teachers and friends he could do to do well in those subjects and its not helping him.

He says his 2nd interest is computing so I thought he should look into computing than rather looking at ICT. But I shouldn't judge on anything because I don't know anything about ICT and Computing. It would be rather helpful if I got a message as soon as possible. Thanks.
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MSI_10
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#2
Report 11 years ago
#2
I'm a 'straight A' student with targets of A/A* on all sciences, maths, english, history etc.

But even then, I want to do computing, it all depends on what the individual WANTS to do, not what he/she is best at. Let's compare it with ICT.

Here's an example, let's say that ICT is using a computer (software, communications etc) while computing is the buliding of the computer itself so it involves computer language, scripts and the more 'confusing' stuff. Another example outside of ICT/computing is a vehicle. Let's say that using the vehicle is ICT while buliding it is computing. Hope that helps....

I THINK it's a well respected course but I'm still in YR 11 and did some research on my A level choices. Many careers are possible for sure since computers are pretty much taking over how we communicate....
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Fallen
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#3
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#3
Computing A2 is a reasonably well respected A-level subject. I wouldn't say as highly regarded as Physics, Chemistry, etc., but still not a joke.
ICT is, as MSI_10 said, more the using of software. It is not considered a hard science subject, although may be good enough for whatever he wants to do.

I have got Computer Science offers from Oxford, Imperial, etc. without having done Computing A2, but at the same time I know lots of people who got the same offers who did/do Computing A2.

Getting an A-B in Computing is better than getting a B-C-D in another science.
Tell him that Chemistry is a ridiculous amount of straight learning. I am the same, I can work things out, but can never get around to revising :P
Chemistry is tough.
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Wookie42
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#4
Report 11 years ago
#4
Difficulty wise, I think most people would agree that Computing is harder than IT. Career wise though, there's no point in doing a CS degree if you don't want to be doing mathematical theory and programming for three years before being a programmer or whatever. If you think you'd enjoy being in a job where IT is being applied then choose it instead Just a note though, if you want to do CS at degree level do not do ICT at A level since it is one of the least respected A levels with media etc.

IT = theory of computers
Computing = application of computers

That's what I've always thought anyway
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zezima
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#5
Report 11 years ago
#5
Ict = dumb ppl
Computing= smart people
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Abstractations
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#6
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#6
I always thought of this as, IT for people who simply wish to be able use a computer, Computing for people who wish to manipulate and understand computers... just my 2p
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jb9191
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#7
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#7
IT vs Computer science

In their most basic terms, Computer Science and Information Technology may not have any difference when being referred to in general and for a good reason, a lot of people do take them to mean more or less the same thing. However, speaking in strict computing terms, there is indeed a difference between the two terms.

Computer science refers to the processes used to create usable computer programs and applications together with all theory behind those processes. Information technology on the other hand refers to the application of computer programs to solve business processes. It is the application of technology in business. Information technology is very vast in terms of scale because it is applied virtually to any type of process that may require automation, from business, scientific research to the music industry, telecoms and banking.

The two terms may also differ depending on school or college, where in some schools they may use one term to refer to a course that combines IT and Computer science modules. In schools that are more engineering based, they use the computer science term as an umbrella term for all theory relating to information technology. In such cases they normally use the term ‘computer engineering’ to refer to the process of creating computer programs, both at system level and application level.

In almost all schools, computer science courses involve learning about computer programming which involves learning the basics of programming methodology, data structures, algorithms, complexity theory all the way down to learning what makes an operating system work, although at computer science level, low level programming is not usually looked at in detail as it is dealt with in computer engineering courses.



Looking at computing in general we can best organize these terms in a hierarchical manner. At a lower level we have computer engineering which is at the ‘chip’ level dealing with the internal circuitry, power and the electronics of a computer. Next level is the computer science level which tends to be quite wide because a computer scientist will actually be acquainted with low level stuff in computer engineering as well as high level programming that integrates with the chips and circuitry to make the machines work. Then at the high level is Information technology which concentrates with studying the impact of applications or solutions developed at the preceding level to business. IT finds ways of integrating these solutions into the business framework.

Summary

1. Computer science deals with creating computer programs while IT deals with the usage of those programs in business.
2. Computer science is at the ‘lower level’ while Information technology is at high level, in computing terms.
3. Information technology integrates computer science into the business world for automated solutions.
4. Computer scientists should have low level workings of computers whereas in IT that’s not necessary.

Please note the above where I say Low Level, that purely means, digging deeper into computing and getting a more in depth understanding of computers.

For example;

someone in an IT field may know how to use a spreadsheet for business yet someone in computer science is more likely to know how to build the actual application (for example; MS Excel).

Also, computer science graduates are able to get computer science related jobs and IT related jobs whilst IT graduates are not likely to get jobs related to computer science.

For example; a computer science graduate could get employed by Microsoft as a games programmer yet an IT student (without a portfolio of work or another separate qualification is unlikely to get that programming job.

Therefore, a computer science degree opens up more graduate opportunities than an IT degree.

This is another reason why Computer Science degrees are more highly regarded all over the world than IT degrees.

In the US computer science is the 4th best degree a student can obtain.
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wactm
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#8
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#8
ICT is basic stuff like microsoft office etc.

Computing is completely differenct, I did programming, binary and a lot of stuff ablout hardware at AS.
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loltube
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#9
Report 6 years ago
#9
(Original post by shawnalex)
Hi, sorry if you don't understand the title just tell me if you don't understand.

Really what I'm looking for is the differences between the two. I hear that one of them has alot of coursework, is more academic than the other, boring and can be stressful and etc. I'm just trying to help a friend as he's needing help. He's not so good at studying as he got B's and C's at GCSE and he's doing Chemistry, Biology and Maths for A-Level and regrets picking them as they involve alot of revising and putting in alot of effort (which he does) and such and tells me that he only suffers at these subjects as he's not capable of memorising information which he's not good at. He tried every revision technique he got taught by teachers and friends he could do to do well in those subjects and its not helping him.

He says his 2nd interest is computing so I thought he should look into computing than rather looking at ICT. But I shouldn't judge on anything because I don't know anything about ICT and Computing. It would be rather helpful if I got a message as soon as possible. Thanks.
don't understand any of this
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N0tTh3B3st
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#10
Report 6 years ago
#10
Thnx that really helped cuse I'm picking my 4 options in year 8 yea they change it so you pick 4 options in year 8 instead of year 9
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CJTWhite
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#11
Report 6 years ago
#11
Computing > ICT

In every situation. Period.

Source: A-level ICT student.
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