Kingdom of ends - Kant. Please explain? Watch

pixiebot
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 8 years ago
#1
I always just add it in essays as one of Kant's ways of working out categorical imperative and never explain it, because I just don't understand it!

Something along the lines that if an action is categorical then we will all come to that same conclusion through reason, but that seems the same as universal law.

Any ideas? I've looked on tutor2u but it doesn't really expand on the idea of everyone using reason.
0
reply
meowmeowmutiny
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#2
Report 8 years ago
#2
IIRC it meant you should act as though everyone else was acting in accordance with the first two laws of the categorical imperative or something.

I'm probably wrong as it's been like 3 years or something. If I'm not then as an example: If you're hiding jews in your attic and and an SS man asks you if you're hiding jews in your house, you tell him as you assume he's being moral or something. Probably a terrible example but whatever.
0
reply
No.1 Loner
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#3
Report 8 years ago
#3
Yeah I have the same problem, but from what i gather i think its treating everybody as an end in themselves and not using any empirical evidence as a basis for making a decision on them.
0
reply
Ineluctable
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#4
Report 8 years ago
#4
(Original post by pixiebot)
I always just add it in essays as one of Kant's ways of working out categorical imperative and never explain it, because I just don't understand it!

Something along the lines that if an action is categorical then we will all come to that same conclusion through reason, but that seems the same as universal law.

Any ideas? I've looked on tutor2u but it doesn't really expand on the idea of everyone using reason.
From my class notes: It means that by virtue of our intelligence and rationality we should all be able to see that moral laws are correct and that morality is only possible if we act in accordance with these truths. It furthers implies that we should only include as a maxim those things we would be willing for us all to live by in a kingdom (world) in which those consequences (ends) came to be real.

It is basically a corollary of the first two, because it includes the universal law and respect for others as ends-in-themselves. Tell me if you don't understand anything here.
0
reply
Shuv11
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#5
Report 8 years ago
#5
(Original post by pixiebot)
I always just add it in essays as one of Kant's ways of working out categorical imperative and never explain it, because I just don't understand it!

Something along the lines that if an action is categorical then we will all come to that same conclusion through reason, but that seems the same as universal law.

Any ideas? I've looked on tutor2u but it doesn't really expand on the idea of everyone using reason.
Have you seen this before? It's a good starting point to understanding it, if not a bit fast

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xwOCmJevigw
0
reply
bethmckenzie
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#6
Report 3 years ago
#6
The third part of the Categorical Imperative means that you should act as though you live in a 'perfect community' and create your own rules based upon what your duty is telling you to do.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts

All the exam results help you need

1,461

people online now

225,530

students helped last year

University open days

  • University of Dundee
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Mon, 26 Aug '19
  • University of Aberdeen
    General Open Day Undergraduate
    Tue, 27 Aug '19
  • Norwich University of the Arts
    Postgraduate (MA) Open Day Postgraduate
    Sat, 31 Aug '19

How are you feeling about GCSE Results Day?

Hopeful (213)
12.71%
Excited (151)
9.01%
Worried (303)
18.08%
Terrified (375)
22.37%
Meh (155)
9.25%
Confused (37)
2.21%
Putting on a brave face (230)
13.72%
Impatient (212)
12.65%

Watched Threads

View All