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    How would you teach a class of Year 11s? Would you pick people at random to answer questions or would you lecture them for an hour while everyone takes notes? How would you teach your class?
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    (Original post by a_musical_guy)
    How would you teach a class of Year 11s? Would you pick people at random to answer questions or would you lecture them for an hour while everyone takes notes? How would you teach your class?
    It does depend on what you're teaching. If it were Maths, then I wouldn't quite know how other than to go by the textbook. If it were History however, I'd be pushing for ideas from the class. This would give an idea of what to focus on, and also allow both teach and class to come to an understanding with each other. That would be the first day. After that, I would try to focus on what the class seemed most comfortable with before continuing any further in other areas, but then trying to relate those areas to what the class has already done.
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    (Original post by Sire)
    It does depend on what you're teaching. If it were Maths, then I wouldn't quite know how other than to go by the textbook. If it were History however, I'd be pushing for ideas from the class. This would give an idea of what to focus on, and also allow both teach and class to come to an understanding with each other. That would be the first day. After that, I would try to focus on what the class seemed most comfortable with before continuing any further in other areas, but then trying to relate those areas to what the class has already done.
    Also depends on the class, some yr 11's are really mouthy and try and be clever, so asking them questions, all they will do is come back with some smart answer to look good in front of their mates. Not al of them...but majority maybe. So it would be a case of letting them know who is boss, and probably teaching in a variety of different methods, as everybody has different learning techniques.
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    A mixture of the two I think. Lectures are pretty boring but texts book even more so, so I would definitely encourage class interaction because I think it encourages interest in the subject.
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    Personally i would make them act out a lot of what they learn - they'd soon learn to disembowell each other with their compasses whilst re-enacting the 100 years war and i could have a nice long coffee break
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    (Original post by a_musical_guy)
    How would you teach a class of Year 11s? Would you pick people at random to answer questions or would you lecture them for an hour while everyone takes notes? How would you teach your class?

    Dunno....i wouldn't have the mental capability of teaching a bunch of ppl our age...i'd go mental in the first week lol


    Ps. WOO-HOO...Finally i made junior member...not much i know but better than new member :-D
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    (Original post by kita)
    Also depends on the class, some yr 11's are really mouthy and try and be clever, so asking them questions, all they will do is come back with some smart answer to look good in front of their mates. Not al of them...but majority maybe. So it would be a case of letting them know who is boss, and probably teaching in a variety of different methods, as everybody has different learning techniques.
    I had thought of the smart arses. I was one after all. The only teachers that the lads and myself really paid attention to were those who made the effort to pay attention to us. This isn't something that can be taught to someone via text sadly, but it does work and can be passed from willing teacher to willing teacher. Grab someones attention, and you can teach them just about anything. Basically I'm just trying to say that my first course of action would be to find the inspiration of the kids in the class. Deliberately picking one of the smart arses to play an active role in helping teach a lesson is another good idea that I've seen work time and again. Question though, a_musical_guy... are you aiming to be a high school teacher?
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    In my school, there are 3 kinds of teachers:

    1) The pushover ones, no control of their pupils at all (only 1 in my school)

    2) Ones where they use their voice/intimidation to control the class

    3) However the one where I am really interested in is this one, they use thier superior intelluctual capacity to overwhelm us. They pose questions that are way over us and tells us to do it, then picks on several children for the inquistion.

    After that, they tell us how do do it. It really works, because you must make at least a bit of headway on the questions. And also they would randomely shout questions out for it to be answerred by a chosen pupil, always works a treat.

    Those who use the text a lot/ do loads of medium style questions will have a lot of chatting on the back. But by posing impossible questions and having high expectations of them, it does the trick.
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    (Original post by Sire)
    I had thought of the smart arses. I was one after all. The only teachers that the lads and myself really paid attention to were those who made the effort to pay attention to us. This isn't something that can be taught to someone via text sadly, but it does work and can be passed from willing teacher to willing teacher. Grab someones attention, and you can teach them just about anything. Basically I'm just trying to say that my first course of action would be to find the inspiration of the kids in the class. Deliberately picking one of the smart arses to play an active role in helping teach a lesson is another good idea that I've seen work time and again. Question though, a_musical_guy... are you aiming to be a high school teacher?
    By smart arses do you mean the clever ones ("swats" if you like) or the "lads"?
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    (Original post by 2776 2)
    In my school, there are 3 kinds of teachers:

    1) The pushover ones, no control of their pupils at all (only 1 in my school)

    2) Ones where they use their voice/intimidation to control the class

    3) However the one where I am really interested in is this one, they use thier superior intelluctual capacity to overwhelm us. They pose questions that are way over us and tells us to do it, then picks on several children for the inquistion.

    After that, they tell us how do do it. It really works, because you must make at least a bit of headway on the questions. And also they would randomely shout questions out for it to be answerred by a chosen pupil, always works a treat.

    Those who use the text a lot/ do loads of medium style questions will have a lot of chatting on the back. But by posing impossible questions and having high expectations of them, it does the trick.
    ah Norman Hindmarsh. My old science teacher. He fitted precisely into that second last category. God damn he was a *******, but looking back in hindsight, I've always said that he was a brilliant teacher. You learnt off him as you went, desperate not to be given the third degree on something you didn't understand. Brilliant.
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    I would interact with my class. Also I would not shout at the destruct kids, I found these teachers the could not control the class. McGregor's Theory X does not work when teaching a class.

    I would also teach them a few interest none sylabus items as well just to get the kids interested. I.e my geograpgy teacher once did a great discussion on BSE.
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    If you are teaching something like english and history, I'd do quite a lot of discussion with them. Asking questions is a good idea in order to make sure that they understand what you are talking about. I don't think that you can really force them to do stuff at that age, so you'd have to be strict on them, but also maybe give them a bit of responsibilty and freedom.
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    (Original post by meepmeep)
    By smart arses do you mean the clever ones ("swats" if you like) or the "lads"?
    nah, by smart arses I meant little shits like me who found that throwing things into the ceiling fans in such a manner that they zoomed into the backs of other students, was a lot more interesting than what a teacher had to say.
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    (Original post by Sire)
    ah Norman Hindmarsh. My old science teacher. He fitted precisely into that last category. God damn he was a *******, but looking back in hindsight, I've always said that he was a brilliant teacher. You learnt off him as you went, desperate not to be given the third degree on something you didn't understand. Brilliant.
    Indeed, and according to my calculations, I am on my 5th exercise book for Further Maths at the moment in 4 months. That equates to over 700 pages of answers, now if that isn't learning I don't know what does.

    Compared to the measly 2 exercise books I used for the whole of last year.
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    (Original post by 2776 2)
    Indeed, and according to my calculations, I am on my 5th exercise book for Further Maths at the moment in 4 months. That equates to over 700 pages of answers, now if that isn't learning I don't know what does.

    Compared to the measly 2 exercise books I used for the whole of last year.
    Exercise books? wow. I think I've almost forgotten how to write. And I always had such pretty handwriting (for a boy). Laptops are basically the only thing I've seen at all my uni residential schools. Though I understand this would present a minor problem with math.
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    (Original post by 2776 2)
    Indeed, and according to my calculations, I am on my 5th exercise book for Further Maths at the moment in 4 months. That equates to over 700 pages of answers, now if that isn't learning I don't know what does.

    Compared to the measly 2 exercise books I used for the whole of last year.
    Yeah, I've gone through over 3000 sheets of A4 in the last year and a half in maths. Mind, I spread work across the page a fair bit, but it's still crazy.

    I recognise the first two types of teachers and perhaps the third one in one or two cases. The worst teacher I ever had was this 65 year old woman who was about 4 foot 3 inches and was very quiet who took us for RE. The "lads" at the back of the room always took her gluesticks and played "who can get the glue stick to hang o the ceiling for the longest?" whilst she used to carry on talking just ignoring them. Although that was an exception to the rule really.

    From the perspective of the son of two teachers, they place a lot of emphasis on "getting the kids on their side" and then trying to teach them. My mum's no genious, but she's a well liked teacher (her name was read out on national television as a good teacher - albeit Newsround but I'm still proud of her ). She's a good motivator though.

    If there's only a few "lads" (or "ladettes" who are becoming increasingly more common) in a group then it's fairly controllable, but if it reaches a certain critical number (say a third of the class in a group of 27) then it gets much more difficult to handle and requires far more work to get the respect (not surprisingly).

    The main thing I've learned though is that I do not, under any circumstances, want to become a teacher (what with the marking until midnight that my parents do - that's what you get for being a maths teacher as opposed to an art/PE/other low homework subject teacher (why is it that the art teachers in my school used to give 15/10 for pieces of work????)
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    I'd make them teach each other. I kinda hated this at college but I really got into the swing of it by the end of my two years there. Giving people bits to research and present to everyone else... tho, you normally only learn one bit really well, cos you can never be arsed to take notes on anyone else's presentations.
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    (Original post by meepmeep)
    The main thing I've learned though is that I do not, under any circumstances, want to become a teacher (what with the marking until midnight that my parents do - that's what you get for being a maths teacher as opposed to an art/PE/other low homework subject teacher (why is it that the art teachers in my school used to give 15/10 for pieces of work????)
    You may think that the Art teachers have no homework to mark, but intreality they help a lot with the A level-GCSE canditates. They used to really get stressed with certain pupils but still helped them a lot, that takes some doing I must admit.
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    (Original post by 2776 2)
    You may think that the Art teachers have no homework to mark, but intreality they help a lot with the A level-GCSE canditates. They used to really get stressed with certain pupils but still helped them a lot, that takes some doing I must admit.
    True, it may be more intensive in lesson, but the out of hours marking is little in comparison to many other subjects (and lower down the school the lessons are far easier to prepare if you're a slack teacher - I never really had an inspiring art teacher and was crap anyway so it's fair to say I'm biased.)
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    (Original post by meepmeep)
    True, it may be more intensive in lesson, but the out of hours marking is little in comparison to many other subjects (and lower down the school the lessons are far easier to prepare if you're a slack teacher - I never really had an inspiring art teacher and was crap anyway so it's fair to say I'm biased.)
    Yes, indeed I can fully understand what you mean. All those hours of unpaid marking. Though the teachers can easily not set any homework...
 
 
 
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