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Jester
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#101
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#101
To be fair Eugene, when Bateman was on the board he was a lawyer. Possibly this chap has been lurking for longer than we thought...
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tommorris
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#102
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#102
(Original post by Me2)
many unis dont like law a-level, but english and history are good.
According to P.H. Kenny ("Studying Law", Butterworths):
"Law teachers are often not enthusiastic about the value of 'A' level law as a preliminary to its undergraduate study. This is largely a hangover from the not so distant past when 'A' level law consisted of a superficial treatment of large areas of law. This is not now the case, and there are valuable books and materials produced for the 'A' level student. Consequently, I would not see any great harm in a would-be student attempting this particular 'A' level in order to test his enthusiasm and aptitude for the subject. To this, two warnings should be given: first, there is, particularly amongst older law teachers, a residual suspicion about 'A' level law. Secondly, the student himself proceeding to degree level should not assume that his qualification will give him a flying start. On the contrary, he should be extra cautious to avoid any muddled or damaging preconceptions."

Sums up everything that needs to be said, I think.
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HereFishyFishy
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#103
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#103
(Original post by tommorris)
According to P.H. Kenny ("Studying Law", Butterworths):
"Law teachers are often not enthusiastic about the value of 'A' level law as a preliminary to its undergraduate study. This is largely a hangover from the not so distant past when 'A' level law consisted of a superficial treatment of large areas of law. This is not now the case, and there are valuable books and materials produced for the 'A' level student. Consequently, I would not see any great harm in a would-be student attempting this particular 'A' level in order to test his enthusiasm and aptitude for the subject. To this, two warnings should be given: first, there is, particularly amongst older law teachers, a residual suspicion about 'A' level law. Secondly, the student himself proceeding to degree level should not assume that his qualification will give him a flying start. On the contrary, he should be extra cautious to avoid any muddled or damaging preconceptions."

Sums up everything that needs to be said, I think.
Yup. I rang Durham today and the admissions tutor told me they dislike Law A-Level and do not recommend it. Nuff said
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Ladyluck
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#104
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#104
(Original post by Laces)
Yup. I rang Durham today and the admissions tutor told me they dislike Law A-Level and do not recommend it. Nuff said
Durham seem quite a way up their own backsides. What alevels people choose should not impose upon the merit of their application. Some people are bound by timetabling constraints. Law for me was in a pool with sciences and maths, when i was already doing one science and had no intention of doing science at degree level it was pointless.A level law is still considered an academic alevel and is surely more credible than some i could (but wont) name. If the candidate is exceptional in other areas why discriminate cus they chose to do alevel law. AT least they know they like the subject and are committed.

I think its cus they know not many private schools offer it, so are discriminating in their favour.
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alocin
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#105
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#105
I did A Level Law - that is what helped to get me interested in the subject. It gives you a headstart for about the first 20mins of the first lecture, then you realise just how much you just skimmed over! Only a couple of people I have talked to on my course actually did it, most places just don't offer it.
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Ladyluck
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#106
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#106
(Original post by alocin)
I did A Level Law - that is what helped to get me interested in the subject. It gives you a headstart for about the first 20mins of the first lecture, then you realise just how much you just skimmed over! Only a couple of people I have talked to on my course actually did it, most places just don't offer it.
yeah but it shouldnt be less regarded. i dont knwo what Durhams problem is, other than a bit of false reputation. lol
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Me2
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#107
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#107
(Original post by Ladyluck)
yeah but it shouldnt be less regarded. i dont knwo what Durhams problem is, other than a bit of false reputation. lol
it doesn't really matter what durhams problem is, if they dont like a-level law, then they wont offer you a place, and thats more your problem than theirs
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Ladyluck
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#108
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#108
(Original post by Me2)
it doesn't really matter what durhams problem is, if they dont like a-level law, then they wont offer you a place, and thats more your problem than theirs
They are the ones losing out on decent students cus of their snobby attitude
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HereFishyFishy
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#109
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#109
(Original post by Ladyluck)
Durham seem quite a way up their own backsides. What alevels people choose should not impose upon the merit of their application. Some people are bound by timetabling constraints. Law for me was in a pool with sciences and maths, when i was already doing one science and had no intention of doing science at degree level it was pointless.A level law is still considered an academic alevel and is surely more credible than some i could (but wont) name. If the candidate is exceptional in other areas why discriminate cus they chose to do alevel law. AT least they know they like the subject and are committed.

I think its cus they know not many private schools offer it, so are discriminating in their favour.
To be honest, i agree with you. I don't see why they dislike law so much..it shows how keen a person is to study law and suggests they are making an effort to get a headstart. Durham said they didn't like the subject because they like to impose their own way of teaching. They like 'fresh' students I take AS level law at night class, but gladly they disregarded it..
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munch
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#110
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#110
Sorry to drop in on the conversation like this,

I am preparing to read Law at Merton College Oxford.
However, I am British national who has been out of the country for four years and subsequently i actually don't have any A-levels. The American qualifications i do have really aren't worth the paper they are printed on.

How is this going to reflect in the Legal realm?
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feli123
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#111
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#111
Um...I'm doing law right now and got accepted to Durham for law, so I suppose the admissions tutors at Durham are not as biased as you think. Sorry for contradicting you, but this has indeed happened to me.

(Original post by Laces)
To be honest, i agree with you. I don't see why they dislike law so much..it shows how keen a person is to study law and suggests they are making an effort to get a headstart. Durham said they didn't like the subject because they like to impose their own way of teaching. They like 'fresh' students I take AS level law at night class, but gladly they disregarded it..
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suz19
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#112
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#112
(Original post by feli123)
Um...I'm doing law right now and got accepted to Durham for law, so I suppose the admissions tutors at Durham are not as biased as you think. Sorry for contradicting you, but this has indeed happened to me.
I'm doing A Level Law too and got accepted to all the unis I applied to so I don't think unis discriminate against it as much as people think- if you're predicted an A in a subject, an A's an A. It's not any less of an A because it's in Law.
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tommorris
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#113
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#113
I don't think it's discriminated against as much as some make out. As Kenny said in the quote above, the curriculum has improved significantly since it became AS/A2.
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OldMan
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#114
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#114
(Original post by Me2)
it doesn't really matter what durhams problem is, if they dont like a-level law, then they wont offer you a place, and thats more your problem than theirs
And it's not just Durham, many Uni's say they don't like A-Level Law. Birmingham and Oxford (Queen's College?), and possibly others, say so on their Web sites.
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kingslaw
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#115
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#115
(Original post by OldMan)
And it's not just Durham, many Uni's say they don't like A-Level Law. Birmingham and Oxford (Queen's College?), and possibly others, say so on their Web sites.
I know two people who have both got into Oxford with A-level law, so they hardly discriminate. They may not like it, but they're not going to sacrifice the opportunity of having a good student on the books just because they took A-level law!
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OldMan
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#116
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#116
(Original post by kingslaw)
I know two people who have both got into Oxford with A-level law, so they hardly discriminate. They may not like it, but they're not going to sacrifice the opportunity of having a good student on the books just because they took A-level law!
Good Grief yes!! I Didn't mean for a a minute that if you had A-Level Law you were eternally doomed. However, if I were a borderline candidate for Law, and if I were hoping to apply to one of the more competative Uni's, and if I were deciding between Law and (say) History for AS/A2, I'd go for History.
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Bhaal85
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#117
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#117
Don't most potential Oxbridge students usually do four or more subjects?
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OldMan
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#118
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#118
(Original post by Bhaal85)
Don't most potential Oxbridge students usually do four or more subjects?
##

Well, that would depend on the school. At state grammar schools, definately. At many or most Independant schools probably not.
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kingslaw
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#119
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#119
(Original post by Bhaal85)
Don't most potential Oxbridge students usually do four or more subjects?
No

Well, not the ones I know.
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lilsunflower
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#120
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#120
(Original post by Bhaal85)
Don't most potential Oxbridge students usually do four or more subjects?
I do 6 and it didn't help me Lolz.. I don't think there's such a criteria.. as long as you meet their grade requirements then the rest depends very much on PS and interview (ESP!)
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