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Vitriol
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#121
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#121
(Original post by munch)
Sorry to drop in on the conversation like this,

I am preparing to read Law at Merton College Oxford.
However, I am British national who has been out of the country for four years and subsequently i actually don't have any A-levels. The American qualifications i do have really aren't worth the paper they are printed on.

How is this going to reflect in the Legal realm?
Well, I know some people who have the IB qualifications and find it very difficult to get past the narrow-minded grad. recruitment departments at major law firms. However, you can always state in your application forms that you never had the opportunity to study for A-Levels.
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quasar_1767
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#122
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#122
i am from the sub continent , all geared up to apply for uni of london external program for LLB.Though this degree is recognised here but i am wondering if its worth spending this much out of my own pocket. Whats the standing of this degree in UK n USA ? do i have a better option then? I would appreciate ur advice please.
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Vitriol
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#123
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#123
Are you not assigned to a specific London college? They have differing reputations for law e.g. UCL v QM.
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mobbdeeprob
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#124
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#124
I haven't read any of the responses to this thread - just the initial posting. May I say, a very useful (honest and realistic) guide to the state of play!

I'm hoping to apply for Law this coming September, you have raised some important points.

I'm not 'in it for the money' (so to speak) but -
£35k then £65k on qualification!!! Bloody heck, that is serious money.
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c1130762
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#125
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#125
I am studying at Bournemouth Uni at the moment, Law and Tax at my second year, I have a 2.1. Even so are the 'really big' firms, like Clifford Chance still apply an inherent discrimination policy base on the rankings of the school one go? And do you know what can I do to presen the best, attractive CV EVER?
Thank You Very Much!
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Vitriol01
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#126
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#126
(Original post by c1130762)
I am studying at Bournemouth Uni at the moment, Law and Tax at my second year, I have a 2.1. Even so are the 'really big' firms, like Clifford Chance still apply an inherent discrimination policy base on the rankings of the school one go? And do you know what can I do to presen the best, attractive CV EVER?
Thank You Very Much!
Hi, I've heard of people from Kingston University being recruited by CC but that's the exception rather than the norm. There's no reason you can't become gainfully employed at one of the City's megafirms, but, IMO, you'll need to really shine. I'd say a first and you'll need excellent A-Levels - Cs aren't going to cut it.

For the best CV, I suggest you get some foreign work experience and excellent grades. Also try and be active at University and present something on your CV/ application form that is 'out of the norm'. For example, I ran a very successful investment trust at school. That sort of stuff stands out.
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Melanie47
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#127
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#127
(Original post by Vitriol)
I seem to read a lot of misconceptions on this board. I've lurked here for quite a while after being referred by a friend who wanted some advice. Anyway, if you're wanting to become a lawyer at a major firm and earn big $$$ (), you need to:

1. Get 3 As or AT THE VERY LEAST, AAB. Very few of the big firms will even entertain you if you don't have these. Don't worry so much about GCSEs - I only did 5 due to illness. Some firms don't even require you to list them.

2. Go to a reputable university. I only had a choice between Durham and Newcastle. I had to stay local because I hadn't fully recuperated after being ill. I was offered a place at Van Mildert, Durham and didn't like it, so chose NCL instead. Very happy 3 years. Don't get hung up if you don't get into Oxbridge. Providing you've been to a highly-regarded uni (something that's research-based or York/ Durham) then you won't have any problems.

DO NOT choose anything that isn't redbrick unless it's Oxford Brookes or UWE! Even if you do choose one of those better, newer unis, there is a great deal of snobbery in the City. It is starting to disappear, albeit very slowly. Fact remains: new universities are not highly-regarded by most London firms. You can get a 1st, have 5 As at A-level and a whole raft of extra-curriculars but you're still likely to lose out.

3. You don't need to study law. I read finance (got a 2:1) and have been wooed by some of the rich American firms which are finance-focussed. Something like 50% of City lawyers are non-law and it in no way harms your chances if you've read any other academic subject. By "academic" I don't mean Media or Star Trek Studies etc. :P

4. Get very good grades throughout your studies. You won't get an interview if you don't average at least a 2:1 throughout your career at university.

5. Find out about the law and the major firms in your first year and apply for vacation schemes in your second year. Vac schemes are very useful when applying for TCs as they show an interest in the law.

6. Get some good stuff on your CV. I know people who got high degrees from great unis (including Ox) but haven't been able to secure an interview at a major firm because they lack the "commercial acumen" that firms are attracted to.

Follow those stages and enjoy your career in the law. I'm currently doing my CPE (law conversion course which lasts for 1 year) and will begin my LPC in September. My training contract starts in 2005 at a major American firm in London. 35k for first two years and 65k on qualification.

Bottom line: Get excellent A-Level grades, go to a highly-regarded uni, get good grades, apply to lots of firms, sit back and relax while you get free cash and a fat salary when you start your career.

Good luck. PM me if you want to ask any Qs.
Firstly, I just want to thank you for posting this and verybody else who has posted helpful stuff up on this thread. I can't tell you how much it has helped me.
I was wondering whether you Vitriol or indeed anyone else who is doing the CPE, could tell me what is like/how you are finding it. I think that I will do a degree in French maybe with Spanish or another new language from scratch - do think this would be a good degree to have under my belt? Also, I am planning to do French, Spanish, History and Chemistry for A level - do you think these are good choices?
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Aj2003
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#128
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#128
I think they are very good choices and make you a well rounded person academically.

I wish i had a chance to really make good choices as opposed to letting my option blocks restrict the subjects i picked.

I selected: History, I.C.T, Business Studies & Communication Studies. 3 Of these are which apparently are on university blacklist subjects for Law. .
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Melanie47
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#129
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#129
(Original post by Aj2003)
I think they are very good choices and make you a well rounded person academically.

I wish i had a chance to really make good choices as opposed to letting my option blocks restrict the subjects i picked.

I selected: History, I.C.T, Business Studies & Communication Studies. 3 Of these are which apparently are on university blacklist subjects for Law. .
Oh dear. My school is pretty good at letting the option blocks please everyone, and even if they don't they can generally make exceptions.
They are the subjects that I am best at, there isn't really much else I could do anyway
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Saagar
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#130
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#130
I hear Bristol Uni had the most number of graduates employed by law firms 2 years ago which is why I wouldn't mind staying here (bristol) thats if i got in. What about LSE and Warwick? I always find LSE in particular is very underrated. :tsr: :tsr:
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Vitriol01
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#131
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#131
(Original post by Melanie47)
Firstly, I just want to thank you for posting this and verybody else who has posted helpful stuff up on this thread. I can't tell you how much it has helped me.
I was wondering whether you Vitriol or indeed anyone else who is doing the CPE, could tell me what is like/how you are finding it. I think that I will do a degree in French maybe with Spanish or another new language from scratch - do think this would be a good degree to have under my belt? Also, I am planning to do French, Spanish, History and Chemistry for A level - do you think these are good choices?
CPE = hard and boring. Actually, it's not really the subject matter that's hard but rather the volume of work that has to be completed on a weekly basis for tutorials etc. Then you have 7 wonderful exams in the space of a week. The joy!

So, to answer your question, I think a French/ Spanish degree would be excellent. Law firms are always looking for graduates with language skills (in fact, the American firm that hired me is particularly keen on French-speaking people) so a degree in French, for example, would stand you in excellent stead. Those A-Level choices also seem fine to me.
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Melanie47
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#132
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#132
(Original post by Vitriol01)
CPE = hard and boring. Actually, it's not really the subject matter that's hard but rather the volume of work that has to be completed on a weekly basis for tutorials etc. Then you have 7 wonderful exams in the space of a week. The joy!

So, to answer your question, I think a French/ Spanish degree would be excellent. Law firms are always looking for graduates with language skills (in fact, the American firm that hired me is particularly keen on French-speaking people) so a degree in French, for example, would stand you in excellent stead. Those A-Level choices also seem fine to me.
Thanks! One of the reasons I wasn't sure about doing a degree and then converting, was the sheer volume of work you have to do in year. I will probably do a degree in law with French in the end.
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Vitriol01
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#133
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(Original post by Melanie47)
Thanks! One of the reasons I wasn't sure about doing a degree and then converting, was the sheer volume of work you have to do in year. I will probably do a degree in law with French in the end.
If I had my time over again, I'd have done something I really enjoyed at university, such as War Studies etc. That would've been so damned cool.
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Melanie47
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#134
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(Original post by Vitriol01)
If I had my time over again, I'd have done something I really enjoyed at university, such as War Studies etc. That would've been so damned cool.
I do think that in the end it is much more worthwhile to do something that you really enjoy at university, rather than doing a degree in a subject you hate just because you think you'll end up in a highly paid job. I'm taking a lot of time over making this decision - I don't want to waste four years of my life.
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Fa|ique
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#135
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#135
Hi, I'm a prospective student from Singapore, and reading Vitriol's first post just made me feel faint... I've always wanted to land that job in the magic circle of city firms, but I'm beginning to feel that I'm doomed not to...

I've gotten AAC in my Singapore A Levels, but have gotten unconditional offers to read law from Manchester and Queen Mary. So, would I still stand a chance of getting one of those TCs and ultimately the job, if I decided on Manchester as my choice?

Although I also applied for Cambridge, Durham and Nottingham as well as SOAS, I'm not very optimistic about getting any offers from the first three. So would Manchester be a good place to read law if I wanted a job at those big City firms? Sorry if I rambled on a little long...
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Vitriol01
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#136
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(Original post by Fa|ique)
Hi, I'm a prospective student from Singapore, and reading Vitriol's first post just made me feel faint... I've always wanted to land that job in the magic circle of city firms, but I'm beginning to feel that I'm doomed not to...

I've gotten AAC in my Singapore A Levels, but have gotten unconditional offers to read law from Manchester and Queen Mary. So, would I still stand a chance of getting one of those TCs and ultimately the job, if I decided on Manchester as my choice?

Although I also applied for Cambridge, Durham and Nottingham as well as SOAS, I'm not very optimistic about getting any offers from the first three. So would Manchester be a good place to read law if I wanted a job at those big City firms? Sorry if I rambled on a little long...
Hi, I think AAC might be a problem for some firms. I know quite a few which stipulate AAB as a minimum. Having said that, however, Manchester is an exceptional law school. I know many people who went there and landed jobs at Freshfields, Jones Day, Ashurst etc.
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muncrun
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#137
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#137
I've an acquaintance who's training at A&O, and has ABC at A level. Admittedly, this is an exception, however it shows that any AAB cut-off point doesn't operate rigidly so long as you can make up for it in other areas.
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kreamied
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#138
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#138
Hi,
im an international student got aacd for my a levels and have applied for warwick law. im wondering if my grades are good enough for warwick law and need your comments. and does a fourth a level grade actually count for much? please help. thanks!
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Dreama
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#139
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#139
(Original post by muncrun)
I've an acquaintance who's training at A&O, and has ABC at A level. Admittedly, this is an exception, however it shows that any AAB cut-off point doesn't operate rigidly so long as you can make up for it in other areas.
*Applauds Muncrun*

I love exceptions

(Original post by kreamied)
Hi,
im an international student got aacd for my a levels and have applied for warwick law. im wondering if my grades are good enough for warwick law and need your comments. and does a fourth a level grade actually count for much? please help. thanks!
Warwick are currently giving out offers of AAA with various additions. Good luck though...
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katy1986
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#140
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#140
(Original post by Vitriol)
I seem to read a lot of misconceptions on this board. I've lurked here for quite a while after being referred by a friend who wanted some advice. Anyway, if you're wanting to become a lawyer at a major firm and earn big $$$ (), you need to:

1. Get 3 As or AT THE VERY LEAST, AAB. Very few of the big firms will even entertain you if you don't have these. Don't worry so much about GCSEs - I only did 5 due to illness. Some firms don't even require you to list them.

2. Go to a reputable university. I only had a choice between Durham and Newcastle. I had to stay local because I hadn't fully recuperated after being ill. I was offered a place at Van Mildert, Durham and didn't like it, so chose NCL instead. Very happy 3 years. Don't get hung up if you don't get into Oxbridge. Providing you've been to a highly-regarded uni (something that's research-based or York/ Durham) then you won't have any problems.

DO NOT choose anything that isn't redbrick unless it's Oxford Brookes or UWE! Even if you do choose one of those better, newer unis, there is a great deal of snobbery in the City. It is starting to disappear, albeit very slowly. Fact remains: new universities are not highly-regarded by most London firms. You can get a 1st, have 5 As at A-level and a whole raft of extra-curriculars but you're still likely to lose out.

3. You don't need to study law. I read finance (got a 2:1) and have been wooed by some of the rich American firms which are finance-focussed. Something like 50% of City lawyers are non-law and it in no way harms your chances if you've read any other academic subject. By "academic" I don't mean Media or Star Trek Studies etc. :P

4. Get very good grades throughout your studies. You won't get an interview if you don't average at least a 2:1 throughout your career at university.

5. Find out about the law and the major firms in your first year and apply for vacation schemes in your second year. Vac schemes are very useful when applying for TCs as they show an interest in the law.

6. Get some good stuff on your CV. I know people who got high degrees from great unis (including Ox) but haven't been able to secure an interview at a major firm because they lack the "commercial acumen" that firms are attracted to.

Follow those stages and enjoy your career in the law. I'm currently doing my CPE (law conversion course which lasts for 1 year) and will begin my LPC in September. My training contract starts in 2005 at a major American firm in London. 35k for first two years and 65k on qualification.

Bottom line: Get excellent A-Level grades, go to a highly-regarded uni, get good grades, apply to lots of firms, sit back and relax while you get free cash and a fat salary when you start your career.

Good luck. PM me if you want to ask any Qs.
Hey, thanks for your advice!
Ive received offers from Leeds, Sheffield and Exeter so far this year. I like them all equally and each has very similar grade requirements. Which one would you advise, interms of which one City Lawyers would look at more favourably? Thanx!
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