Physics A-Level coursework on thermistors!!

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kmdelune
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#1
Report Thread starter 17 years ago
#1
I have to do a planning on this...

"Investigate, using thermistor, how time varies with temperature for 50 degree c to 180."

any ideas?

Thanks
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#2
Report 16 years ago
#2
you gonna use oil and measure voltage then relate it back to resistance?
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#3
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#3
Hi im [email protected]

i just got the same course work, and im completely stuck. So just wondering if kmdelune, or n e 1 else got any further idea yet? Pleeeessseee e-m me if u have.

Thanx
Ashthing
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#4
Report 16 years ago
#4
yeah im stuck on that. i thought you have to have a known temperature then then see how long it takes for the thermistor thermometer to reach that temp. but i dont have a clue how to do this. im not sure i got the right idea about this coursework. Any Help??? please

[email protected]

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#5
Report 16 years ago
#5
Steiny!! im glad to see you have taken the same path as me
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#6
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#6
hi, ne of you boyz out there willing to give me hand to do this coursewrrok plz, i cant figure it out myself.

Christina xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx mwaaaaaaaaah
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#7
Report 16 years ago
#7
Are you sure it's time with temperature and not resistance with temperature?

The resistance of a thermistor decreases as the temperature increases.

Check this for yourself by placing the thermistor in a testube of oil along with the thermometer. Place this testube in a beaker of water and use a heater to heat the water. This will in turn heat the oil which the thermistor is measuring.

Periodically record the resistance and temperature, i.e at 1 degree intervals.

Plot the temperature as 1/T (temp in kelvin) against the log of the resistance (in ohms) and see how well it fits the straight line predicted by theory.

Hope this helps. If not, you've not lost anything!
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#8
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#8
ps forgot to say, do make sure your resistance is in OHMS and not kilo-ohms or 10^6-ohms or other powers.
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#9
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#9
come on i need to do this for monday, and its time with teperature
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#10
Report 16 years ago
#10
Yes, it is time with temperature, weird as that sounds... O_o



Anyone have any thoughts?

---Overlord
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#11
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#11
come on guyz we need to work together in order to pass this ****e, post sum ideas
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#12
Report 16 years ago
#12
Originally posted by Unregistered
come on guyz we need to work together in order to pass this ****e, post sum ideas
Guys, how about external help?
Take a look on the web, e.g. www.helptosolve.com
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#13
Report 16 years ago
#13
i think im gonna use oil, and find the current when the thermistor is in the oil at 96% of the temp. then you can tell when the end point is and when to stop timing. hopefully by going through like that then actually timing, it should be fairly accurate. i need to find info tho. any ideas where i can look? o and in case u arent sure (like i wasnt) u only need to heat the oil to 96% of the predetermined temp.
hope ive helped some1!
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#14
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#14
HELP ON THE PHYSICS THERMISTOR EXPERIMENT I HAVENT GOT A CLUE
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#15
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#15
If you put the thermistor in a testube full of oil, and then put the testube in water, the temperature of the oil is not going to increase above 100 degrees.
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#16
Report 16 years ago
#16
I just sat down to do this coursework, and looked for a bit of inspiraton on the net. in reply to a couple of posted points, i reckon you should just graph temperature and and time, time on the x-axis. also, depending on what type of thermistor is being used, the resistance can increase or decrease with temperature (i.e. Negative/Positive Temperature Coefficient thermistors). good point about the submerging of a test tube in water not being able to rise above 100 dgrees. Some sort of computer logging system can be used, i can't remember what they're called at the minute could also be used. much more accurate as it eliminates human error. i'll post anything that springs into my head! hope everyone else'll do the same.
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#17
Report 16 years ago
#17
No 1 has helped much av they!! i got an idea but we all need to work together so wake up n reply ppl!!
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#18
Report 16 years ago
#18
its really easy, all you have to do is find 96% of each of the temps, then find the equivilant resistances, then find the time it takes to get to these resistances from 0 degrees C. then plot!
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#19
Report 16 years ago
#19
thats all very well but how do you work out the equivalent temperatures?!
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#20
Report 16 years ago
#20
It that really important? What I'm wondering is if any of you guys have any good references I can add to my plan?

[email protected]
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