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    During studies when you work is the pay enough to take care of your monthly expenditures including rent?
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    (Original post by Tehreem)
    During studies when you work is the pay enough to take care of your monthly expenditures including rent?
    It depends where you work, how much you work and how much you spend. Outside my accommodation (I was catered), I paid about £30-£40 a week. So if I'd worked 10 hours at minimum wage (£4.92 for 18-20 year olds) I would have been fine. Some places will pay more than minmum wage (though it'll usually be between minimum wage and £6), you may be able to get more hours and you could be more controlled with your money than I was.
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    Thank you for the reply "Wow"

    I am planning to work full time(what ever is allowed) so that at least I will be able to cover my rent. Btw rent is paid monthly right or weekly?
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    Oh posted in the wrong thread.

    Thanks Wow =)
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    (Original post by Tehreem)
    Thank you for the reply "Wow"

    I am planning to work full time(what ever is allowed) so that at least I will be able to cover my rent. Btw rent is paid monthly right or weekly?
    I don't think you'll have time to work full time! you have classes and a degree to study for remember! I don't think you could realistically work much more than 15-20 hours a week. and well if you're a science student, you'll have even less time. plus jobs aren't that easy to get in such a small town.
    and rent (if you mean for halls) is paid either in one lump sum at the start of the year or you can pay it in three installments. This page https://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/student...es/Payingfees/ will tell you more about it. The stuff about the 3 installments is at the very bottom (and don't get it confused with tution fees)
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    Thanks Again.

    I was told by the admin that I can pay the rent monthly once my debit account is made in UK.
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    (Original post by Tehreem)
    Thanks Again.

    I was told by the admin that I can pay the rent monthly once my debit account is made in UK.
    Maybe it's different for internationals. I'm not sure but if I were you, I would try to ring them again just to check that.
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    (Original post by Oh-WOW)
    Maybe it's different for internationals. I'm not sure but if I were you, I would try to ring them again just to check that.

    hmm Ya. Hey what are the usual class timings? For some one doing Mlitt Management in HRM?
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    (Original post by Tehreem)
    hmm Ya. Hey what are the usual class timings? For some one doing Mlitt Management in HRM?
    ah ha. you're a postgrad. that makes more sense. maybe the rent payments are different. but I have no idea about class timings for you.
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    Hey I'm coming to St Andrews next year, and was wondering what the people are like. I mean how susceptible are people to rumors and gossip in the first few weeks? Thing is I know a couple of people who are coming as well and they don't exactly like me... to say the least. I just want a new fresh start and was wondering whether people there are smart enough not to listen to random rumors:confused: in the first couple of weeks.
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    (Original post by peppermill)
    Hey I'm coming to St Andrews next year, and was wondering what the people are like. I mean how susceptible are people to rumors and gossip in the first few weeks? Thing is I know a couple of people who are coming as well and they don't exactly like me... to say the least. I just want a new fresh start and was wondering whether people there are smart enough not to listen to random rumors:confused: in the first couple of weeks.
    I think it's fairly unlikely that you'll be in the same corridor as them, which is probably the worst case scenario in terms of people caring about what they have to say about you. Even if you do end up in the same social circle, I think there will be plenty of people in your hall (and studying the same subject, and in societies) to socialise with, so even if you do need to branch away from people who spread rumours about you, there's plenty of space for you to get a fresh start. There will probably be some people who like gossip, so I guess it's worth being a bit careful to make sure there's no evidence to back the gossip up. If someone's saying stuff about you and there's nothing to back it up, people will realise that the rumours aren't accurate.

    I don't think you need to worry about it this stage, and if it does become a problem, I think you will be able to sidestep it fairly effectively.
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    Hi,
    Just a quick question: are the tuition fees fixed for the year of entry? So would we be expected to pay different amounts dependent on the year (i.e. would it be £1,800 one year then potentially £9,000 for the next year despite entering the university this September)?
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    (Original post by Ellen_M)
    Hi,
    Just a quick question: are the tuition fees fixed for the year of entry? So would we be expected to pay different amounts dependent on the year (i.e. would it be £1,800 one year then potentially £9,000 for the next year despite entering the university this September)?
    Yep, they are fixed from the year of entry. You pay the same amount throughout your four (or five) years.
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    How important did you find preparing for your course in advance through summer reading? I'm just wondering since other universities seem to send their students long lists of books to read which they also expect the students to read, but none of the emails I have received from St Andrews even mentions summer reading. I'm starting the History course, and did find a list of 'Suggested summer reading' from the St Andrews History Department website, but it didn't seem huge importance was placed on new students reading a lot on their module subjects prior to the start of the course.

    I'm a bit confused as to the importance of summer reading... if one doesn't do any summer reading, does this mean one is lagging behind others once the course starts and hence won't do so well during the course? Or is summer reading simply meant to stimulate one's brain so it won't be as difficult to switch to studying full time? My summer job is quite demanding and I have lots of plans for my summer so I was wondering exactly how much time I should make for summer reading - whether I can just read those history books that interest me and maybe leaf through the rest of the list, or whether it is crucial that I read the whole list... What are your experiences, especially if you are doing History?
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    (Original post by SeaSea)
    How important did you find preparing for your course in advance through summer reading? I'm just wondering since other universities seem to send their students long lists of books to read which they also expect the students to read, but none of the emails I have received from St Andrews even mentions summer reading. I'm starting the History course, and did find a list of 'Suggested summer reading' from the St Andrews History Department website, but it didn't seem huge importance was placed on new students reading a lot on their module subjects prior to the start of the course.

    I'm a bit confused as to the importance of summer reading... if one doesn't do any summer reading, does this mean one is lagging behind others once the course starts and hence won't do so well during the course? Or is summer reading simply meant to stimulate one's brain so it won't be as difficult to switch to studying full time? My summer job is quite demanding and I have lots of plans for my summer so I was wondering exactly how much time I should make for summer reading - whether I can just read those history books that interest me and maybe leaf through the rest of the list, or whether it is crucial that I read the whole list... What are your experiences, especially if you are doing History?
    You really don't need to do summer reading. No one I know did. Most of your reading for history will come from your module course reader which you can't buy from the history department until you get there. The books in the suggested summer reading are simply the core texts for the module so if you do get time, read them so you'll have a bit of background knowledge. As I said, you don't need it. So if you don't do it, don't stress. I'd recommend the Pettegree book. Pettegree is one of the professors in the history department and his lectures are basically taken from that book. That book will cover the topics up until reading week so you can read one of the others if you want during reading week. Don't stress too much. Most people wont have done any. I didn't do Mediaeval history during the first semester but I'd imagine people wont have done it either.
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    how many students are there at st andrews?
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    (Original post by victoria1)
    how many students are there at st andrews?
    About 6,000 undergrads and 1,500 post grads from what I've been told.
    It's difficult to find exact figures.
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    Does St Andrews give offers to those on a second sitting?
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    (Original post by SeaSea)
    How important did you find preparing for your course in advance through summer reading? I'm just wondering since other universities seem to send their students long lists of books to read which they also expect the students to read, but none of the emails I have received from St Andrews even mentions summer reading. I'm starting the History course, and did find a list of 'Suggested summer reading' from the St Andrews History Department website, but it didn't seem huge importance was placed on new students reading a lot on their module subjects prior to the start of the course.

    I'm a bit confused as to the importance of summer reading... if one doesn't do any summer reading, does this mean one is lagging behind others once the course starts and hence won't do so well during the course? Or is summer reading simply meant to stimulate one's brain so it won't be as difficult to switch to studying full time? My summer job is quite demanding and I have lots of plans for my summer so I was wondering exactly how much time I should make for summer reading - whether I can just read those history books that interest me and maybe leaf through the rest of the list, or whether it is crucial that I read the whole list... What are your experiences, especially if you are doing History?
    You should make time for 0 Summer reading :yep:
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    (Original post by OddThings)
    Does St Andrews give offers to those on a second sitting?
    Depends on your education system, what you class as second sitting, etc.
    Email them and ask
 
 
 
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